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Two skeins of the next. One skein of the lightest. The needles are of wood, rather fine, not so thick as a drawing pencil. The centre is first knit, beginning with only two loops on your needle, to make the point fine; knit several plain rows, raising one loop in each row; the raising is merely knitting first the outside and then the inside of the last loop, and is continued in every row, whether plain or open, through the whole shawl. When you have ten loops on your needle begin your pattern, which is done as follows:— Knit four plain stitches, bring the wool in front of the needle, and then, taking hold of two loops instead of one, knit them plainly together; continue this till within four loops of the end, which must be knit plain. Always begin and end every open row with four plain stitches. Knit three plain rows between each figured one. When you have from 200 to 250 loops, (which will make a good sized shawl), begin the border, which looks best dark at the edges, and shaded up to light in the middle. Before beginning the border at the top, it is best to knit three or four plain rows of the white wool; and observe, that as there is a right and a wrong side to the shawl, the first row of the border must be continued so as to suit it, by knitting one, more or less, of the plain white rows. Begin with your darkest shade of border, and knit three or more rows of it, according to taste; then the second, the third, the lightest, the third again, second, and darkest, increasing one loop in every row, both open and plain, as before; the last three or four rows should be plain, to make the edge firm. Then fasten off. Begin the side border by taking up all the inside loops, as those in the heel of a stocking are done, and begin with the dark shade as at the top, and in the first row only, raise a loop every fifth stitch, which may be easily done by taking up the little bars or loops that lie between the stitches; go on as before, raising one loop at the end of every row. Be careful to begin all the borders on the same side, as, in consequence of the manner of taking up the loops, there is a difference. The raising the loops at the side border is done to make it set loosely to the shawl, as, if ii were not thus enlarged, it would be tight and confined. The corners and point of the border are neatly joined with a needle and thread.

A TIPPET.

PLATE 21. FIG. 56.

Cut out a tippet or cape of the proper shape and size in paper, and then divide it into five equal portions; each portion may be considered a gore, and by measuring by the stitches put on the pin with the pattern, the right number may easily be ascertained. These gores may be made to increase equally on both sides, as in the Plate, or only on one side. Sometimes long ends are continued with the two front gores, to make a sort of mantilla or pelerine.

Neat tippets might be made with advantage for school girls at times when worsteds are cheap.

FOR A PURSE.

Set on one pin ninety or a hundred stitches, knit the first stitch, put the silk over the pin, then slip a stitch and knit a stitch; turn the slipped stitch over the last knit one, and so on all through the pin; then seam the next row, and so on till completed, when fasten off.

FOR A PURSE

Use four pins. If the silk twist be fine it requires two skeins—if coarse, three skeins; or, if to be made of two colours, half that quantity. Cast on your three pins eighteen loops, if fine, or sixteen loops, if coarse, and begin (after one plain row) to knit in raised French stitch (see No. 31); and when sufficient rounds have been completed to form fourteen holes lengthwise, knit backwards or forwards on two pins in the same stitch, to form the opening; after complete fourteen more holes or batterns, join the purse again by knitting in three pins, as before, until fourteen more holes are done, when bind down and fasten off.

FOR A PURSE,

Two skeins of silk are sufficient (generally of two colours); use four pins, set on four stitches on each pin; begin to knit plain round and round, widen one stitch each round, until you have eighteen stitches on each pin (measure here how much silk you have used that you may know how much to reserve for narrowing with), then knit one stitch plain and one turned for every round, until time to make the opening, when put all your stitches on one needle, knitting backwards and forwards, taking care to preserve the stitch by knitting the back rows properly, by turning the stitches that were before knit plain, continue this till the one skein is used up, when you are at the middle of your purse; take the other skins as many rows again, backwards and forwards, then join the opening by putting the stitches on three needles, as before, and knit round and round until you have but enough silk left for the narrowing, when begin to knit plain, narrowing every round until reduced to four stitches, as before, on each pin, when fasten off.

FOR A PURSE.

Cast seventy-five stitches on one pin; two skeins of silk are sufficient, and very fine pins are best; after knitting one plain row, continue as follows: knit one stitch plain, and then knit the silk twice round the pin, knit two stitches together in turn stitch; again put the silk twice round the pin, and knit two stitches together in turn stitch, and so on to every row, remembering that the first stitch in every row is knit plain.

PRETTY NEW PURSE PATTERN.

Use four pins and set on each of three pins eighteen or twenty loops,

Knit one plain round, and then continue for another round as follows:–

Bring the silk in front of the pin, slip a stitch, knit a stitch, then turn the slipped stitch over the knit one;

Again bring the silk in front of the pin, slip a stitch, knit a stitch, and turn the slipped stitch over the knit one, and sow on to the end of the round,

Knit the two next rounds plain,

And continue alternately knitting one round of the pattern, and two rounds plain, until the purse is finished.

RECEIPT FOR A ZEPHYRINE.

This is a very convenient thing to lie over the head instead of a bonnet, especially in travelling, and is generally knit of two colours. It should be knit with Berlin wool, on two rather fine pins, with knobs at the end.

Set on your pin 100 stitches,

Knit a row plain,

Turn, or purl a row,

Repeat this twice more each,

Then change the colour, and continue knitting and purling alternately, three rows each,

Again change to the first colour, and continue knitting and purling, three rows more each,

Continue thus changing colour until there are five stripes of one colour, and six stripes of the other, when it is finished,

Then gather the ends to a point, bind them with ribbon, and sew on strings to match the darkest colour.

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This is a soft shawl to lay a baby on, or carry it out in, and is desirable on account of its warmth and lightness. Some are made square, others of a half handkerchief shape.

In either case, set on about 130 or more stitches, and knit in honeycomb or French raised stitch, the embossed, hexagon, or any other simple pretty pattern preferred. A border and finge may be added, according to taste, and certainly gives a rich finish to it.

A BABY'S CAP.

Put on eighty stitches on the three pins, so as to have 240 stitches; knit twelve, turning every alternate stitch; in the next row turn the stitch which was plain before ; take in eighty stitches, one at every fourth stitch, so as to leave a full border; then knit one row plain, one open row, three rows plain, and twenty-four rows double knitting; then knit three rows plain, one open row, three rows plain, twenty-four rows double knitting, three rows plain, one open row, and three rows plain.

Cast on twenty-four stitches at each end of the first three plain, to form the back of the cap; then knit forty-eight rows double knitting the whole length ; then take in gradually to the size of the crown in one row, knit three rows plain, one open row ; again three plain; fasten off at the top, join up the back, and knit three rows plain, one open row, and three plain.

The crown is made by putting on sixteen stitches, and increasing one at each end for sixteen rows; then knit sixteen rows; then decrease sixteen rows, which forms the circle.

A BABY'S CAP.
PLATE 21. FIG. 57.

Set on one stitch on each of three pins, and knit a circular piece of knitting in hole-stitch, until there are 110 stitches altogether on the three pins. Knit six ribs of stocking knitting, one of holes, and one of garter rib, Knit six ribs of stocking knitting, one of holes, and one rib of garter-stitch, Knit six ribs of stocking, one of holes, and one of garter, Knit six ribs of stocking, one of holes, one of garter, two of stocking, and two of garter, Finish off twenty-two stitches, and divide the remainder of the stitches on two pins, Knit three ribs of stocking, making holes at six stitches distance, which serve for ribbons, Knit three ribs of garter-stitch, two of stocking, six of garter, three of stocking, one row of holes, four ribs of stocking, six ribs of garter, three ribs of stocking, one row of holes, four ribs of stocking, six ribs of garter, and three of stocking; after which three more of stocking, with holes at six stitches distance, to admit of a second ribbon.

For the border, continue knitting twenty rows in huckaback stitch; for the border behind, take up the stitches at the ear on each side, and knit sufficient rows in huckaback stitch till each strip is long enough to reach the middle of the back. Put in a ribbon behind, and the

whole is completed.

A BABY'S BONNET OR HOOD.
PLATE 21. FIG. 58.

For the border, set on eighty stitches and knit in huckaback stitch, narrow one stitch at each end of every other row, till you have knit ten rows. Next, commence the head-piece, and knit six rows in double knitting, the one row of holes, eight rows of double knitting, one of holes, and six rows of double knitting, then begin to knit in honeycomb-stitch, fasten off two stitches at the end of each pin, every row until there are but twenty-four on the pin, then fasten off.

For the crown, set on five stitches, widen each row till you have sixteen loops, then knit twelve rows. Narrow at each end for two rows, knit fourteen rows and fasten off. Sew the crown to the head-piece with wool of the same quality.

Begin the curtain by taking up all the stitches at the back, and knitting six rows in double knitting, widening four stitches on each pin; then one row of holes, widening two stitches; then six rows of double knitting still widening, one of holes, widening two stitches, and double knitting, increasing till there are 150 stitches on the pin, then fasten off, and put in ribbons through the holes where wanted.

A GENTILEMAN’S NIGHT CAP.
PLATE 21. FIG. 59.

This cap has a very pretty appearance, something resembling old fashioned insertion lace, as there is an ornamented border round the head. It is done with fine needles and cotton, and knit round like a stocking. The plan is as follows:— Cast on any number of stitches, divisable by thirteen. 1st Row. Turn one, knit one, turn one, slip one, knit one. Draw the slipt loop over, knit six plain, bring the cotton over, as though going to turn, knit one, bring your cotton to the top and knit one. 2nd Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit nine. 3rd Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit five, bring the cotton to the top and knit two. 4th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit nine. 5th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit four, bring the cotton to the top, knit one, bring the cotton to the top, knit three. 6th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit nine. 7th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit three, bring the cotton to the top, knit one, bring the cotton to the top, knit four. 8th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit nine. 9th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit two, bring the cotton to the top, knit five. 10th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit nine. 11th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit one, bring the cotton to the top, knit six. 12th Row. Turn, knit, turn, slip, and draw over, knit nine, knit two plain rounds, turn five rounds, knit one round, throwing the cotton twice over the needle; turn one round, repeat this until you have eighteen turned rounds. Knit two plain rounds, turn five rounds, take four needles, and knit and turn three rounds alternately, narrowing at each needle end, having a turn, knit and seam between each narrowing; continue this until there are four loops on each needle, which will draw round the tassel.

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Very pretty bags may be made of fantail-stitch in silk twist, for which purpose set on as many stitches, divisable by fourteen, as are required for the width of the bag. About four times fourteen or fifty-six stitches will be a useful size, adding, if preferred, four extra stitches on each end, and between each of the fourteen stitches, to separate the pattern more effectually, and make it look richer. These extra stitches will amount to five times four or twenty, making in all seventy-six stitches.

Knit the four stitches of any pattern preferred ; supposing the open hem, No. 4, is selected, then knit as follows:—

Set on seventy-six stitches, knit four plain ribs, and six turn-stitch rows. Open hem the first four stitches, Fantail the next fourteen stitches, Open hem the next four stitches, and so on, till the last open hemmed four stitches complete the roW. Continue as above till a sufficient length is done for both sides of the bag, after which, seam it up, and put cord and tassels to complete the whole, lining it or not, according to pleasure.

KETTLE HOLDERS.
PLATE 21. FIG. 62.

This is knit in double knitting, with a border of plain ribs round.

Set thirty-two stitches on one pin,

Knit four ribs plain,

Knit double knitting, letting the first four stitches and the last four stitches of every row be plain knitting.

When the double knit part is quite square, add the four ribs of plain knitting, to complete the border, and fasten off.

A little loop of twisted wool is put at the top to hang it by.

KNIT MATS, OR KETTLE HOLDERS.
PLATE 21. FIG. 63.

This is knit to resemble fringe all over, and when well done looks very pretty.

Use fine needles and a common kind of worsted for knitting the wool fringe, which must be thick and soft.

Set on any number of stitches, and knit one plain row, after which, begin the next row by knitting

one plain stitch, then put the wool between the pins round the fingers, and back again between the pins in front, and so on, similar to the rug-stitch, No. 33.

KNIT OPEN BRAID.
PLATE 21. FIG. 64.

This is very simple, and if done with cord or thick cotton or worsted, might be very useful for sewing on, to ornament children's dresses; or if of silk twist, for putting round pincushions, curtains, &c. Set on one stitch, and knit as many stitches as the longest pin will possibly hold. Knit two rows plain, and then unrove one row by pulling out the pin, and draw the wool through the last loop, to keep

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