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very firmly sewed round, either with tape or with button-hole stitch. After putting in the sleeves, run or backstitch the plaits firmly down again, at about 4 nail below the gathering, to make them lie flat.

SCALE.
- Man's size. Woman's Girl's
size. large size.
Yds. mls. Yds. nis. Yds. mls.
Width of flannel .............................. 14 14 14
Quantity required for one .................. 10... 5 8 . . 10 6 . .0
Length of skirts ........... 4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2. . 0 l; ... 0 14. .0
Number of breadths........................... 4... 0 4 ... 0 4 . .0
Length of sleeve down the Selvage......... 12 10 8
Width of ditto ................................. 9 8 7
Length of shoulder-strap..................... 4} 4 3}
Width of ditto ............ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1} 1% l
Size of double neck-gusset .................. 2} 2 2
Size of sleeve-gusset........................... 3 3 2}
Width of collar................................. 5 6 4
Length down the Selvage..................... 10 8 8
Width of wristband........................... 2} 2 2
Length of ditto down the selvage ......... 4} 4 4
Width of band................................. 2} 2 2
Length of ditto down the selvage ......... 20 12 12
Space to cut for the shoulders ............ 2} 2 2
Depth for the shoulders to slope ......... 1 l #

PLATE 10. FIG. 2. This figure represents a dressing-gown made of dimity. A deep hem of 3 or 4 mails is made at the bottom, insertion-work is sewed up the fronts, and round the cape, collar, and wrists, at the edge of the work a frill is put on. The gown is fulled in evenly to the shoulder-strap and neck-gusset at the top, and may be confined or not, at the waist behind, according to pleasure. The front is generally

left unconfined, so that the band alone arranges it in folds.

FIG. 2, 3.
SCALE.

Woman's Woman's

large size. small size.

Yds. nis. Yds. mls Width of material ............. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- 14 14 Number of breadths.................................... 3 breadths | 3 breadths The one breadth crossed off at the top ............ 5 5} Length of breadths .................................... l{..0 1}..0 Length of shoulder-strap................. - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3+ 3} Width of ditto.................... - - 1} l{} Length of neck-band or case ..... - - - 10 9 Space for shoulder ......... - * * * - - - - - - - - - - - - ----------- 3} 3} Length of arm-hole .................................... 3 2} Arm-hole curved into the cloth ..................... 14 I Length of waist ........... * * * * * * * * * * * * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 5 4} Length of string-case ....... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10 8 Sleeve cut according to Plate 12, Fig. 5 and 6... |Fig. 5 & 6. Fig. 5 & 6 Collar cut according to Plate 13, Fig. 7 ......... Fig. 7. Fig. 7 Cape cut according to Plate 13, Fig. 6.......... - - Fig. 6. Fig. 6

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PLATE 10. FIG. 3.

This gown, made of flannel, either plain or printed, is plaited in small regular folds at the neck, where a string-case of muslin or white ribbon is put for a string to pass through. The gown is again plaited in the same folds at the waist, in two rows, to which another string-case is sewed all round the waist. A deep hem is made at the bottom, and turned up with a piping of white; or if it is a printed flannel, of some coloured glazed calico or muslin; the ribbons in front are the same colour, and a flannel band is piped with it, as well as the wristbands and every seam on the shoulders, round the sleeves, &c. The sleeves should be stitched down about 1 nail below the shoulder, to make the fulness lie close and flat. If made of printed flannel, it is useful to wear at the sea-side, as a walking dress, to and from bathing.

CLOAK DRESSING-GOWN.
PLATE 10. FIG. 4.

This is a comfortable simple pattern; it can be made either of flannel or lighter material, and is equally suitable for men, women, and children; it is very convenient for the latter when taken out of a bath, or for sitting up in bed.

SCALE. - Man. Woman. Girl of 16 yrs. Girl of 10 yrs. Child of 5 yrs. Yds. mls. Yds. mls. Yds. mls. Yds. n.1s. Yds. mls. Length of skirt .............................. 2 . .0 1 +...() 14. .0 1} . .0 14. .0 Number of breadths........................ 4 . .0 4 . .0 4 . .0 3 . .0 3 . .0 Space for shoulder ........................ 2 1 I } # Depth of arm-holes ........................ 5 4 3} 3} 3 Length of string-case ..................... 12 10 9 | 8 7 Length of band.............................. 16 14 12 10 8 Shoulder-piece (see Plate 13)............ Fig. 1 Fig. 1 Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 4 Collar (see Plate 13) .............. - - - - - - - Fig. 7 Fig. 7 Fig. 7 Fig. 31 Fig. 13 Cape (see Plate 13)........................ Fig. 6 Fig. 6 Fig. 6 Fig. 6 Fig. 6 Sleeves (see Plate 12) ..................... Fig. 16 Fig. 16 Fig. 16 Fig. 16 Fig. 16 cut smaller cut smaller

After the seams have been herring-boned up, the cloak is folded in four, to find the shoulders, which are cut in a gentle slope to the proper width, and sewed up. The arm-holes having been left, the sleeves are next put in, after which, the gown is fulled evenly into the double shoulder-piece; the collar and cape are next put on ; the hem at the bottom should be deep, and turned up with a flannel or tape piping; down the sides and round the cape, collar, &c., should be bound with flannel binding, to give a finish. Some persons omit the sleeves, having merely slits for the arms.

A DRESSING JACKET.

PLATE 10. Flg. 5, 6.

Some persons merely wear a little flannel, calico, or twilled muslin dressing jacket, and as it is usually made to fit the figure, the breadths are much gored; for the purpose, therefore, of better explaining the shape, a figure is made of the breadth when cut out. Fig. 5 A, is half of the back breadth, which is doubled in two, and Fig. 5 B is the whole of one of the front breadths.

SCALE.
Woman's | Woman's Girl's Girl's
large size. small size. large size. small size.
Number of breadths............... 3 3 3 3
Width of material.................. 12 mls. l l nls. | 11 mls. l l nis.
Length of each breadth ......... 14 – | 12 — 10 — | 8 —
Length of sleeve .................. 12 – | 10 — 8 — | 8 —
Width of ditto ..................... 10 — 8 — | 8 — | 8 —
Length of collar.................. ... I 8 — 64 — 6 — 5% —
Width of ditto .......... ----------- 3 — 3 — 2 — 2 –
Size of neck-gusset ............... 2 — 13 — 14 — 13 —
Length of arm-hole ........... ---- 4 — 4 — 3} — 3 —
Length of string-case ............ 4 — 34 – 3} – || 3 —
Space for shoulder ............... 3? — 3} — 3 — 2} —
Length of skirt-gusset ............ 4 — | 3 – || 3 — 2} —
Breadth of ditto .................. 2 — 1} – l? — 1} –
FIG. 5 A.

Or half the back of the jacket when cut out, supposing the breadth to be folded exactly in two. Let A L be the folded side.

SCALE.
Nails
Space from A to B .................. --- - - - - - - - - - 5}
Do. do. 2}
Do. do. 3}
Do. do. 1+
Do. do. 2#.
Do. do. :
Do. do. 3
Do. do. l?
Do. do. #
Do. do. 3
Do. do. 2}
FIG. 5 B.
Or the whole of one of the front breadths.
SCALE
Nails
Space from 4
Do. do. 4}
Do. do. I
Do. do. 2}
Do. do. 2}
Do. do. I
Do. do. 2}
Do. do. 2+
Do. do. 6
Do. do. 12 w

In making up this jacket, sew the 3 breadths together, putting in at the bottom two gussets or triangular pieces. Make a narrow hem at the bottom, sew up the shoulders, and put in the sleeves. Set

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the back breadth plainly into the collar, but full it at each end into the neck gusset, and also in front. Put the string-case about a mail lower than the arm-holes.

FLANNEL PETTICOATS.
PLATE 10. FIG. 7.

The breadths of flannel are cut according to the height of the person, allowing a good tuck besides, to be let down after the petticoat has been washed.

SCALE.

First or largest size, for a full grown woman:—3 breadths of flannel sewed simply together; slit behind 6 nails deep, and opened in a seam. Second size, for a middle sized woman, 2} breadths; the half is crossed off 5 nails, and the two gores are sewed, one on each side, between the two plain breadths; slit behind 5 nails; it is made in the middle of one of the plain breadths. It is more economical to cut two petticoats at once, as 5 breadths will make two, but it requires 3 to cut one out, and there must be waste. Third size, for a girl of fourteen or sixteen, 2 breadths. From 1 breadth is cut a gore of 5 nails at the top, sloped off to 1 mail; this gore is sewed at the opposite side of the same breadth, placing the l nail width at the narrow end of the breadth. The slit behind must be determined by doubling the petticoat exactly in half, letting it be about 4 nails long. Another way of cutting this petticoat, is by crossing it like a shift, and then putting the two broader ends to the bottom, while the narrow part is at the top ; by this method there is no waste, and it saves both time and trouble. Fourth size, 2 breadths: 1 breadth is cut in half, and l half is gored 5 nails; the two gores are sewed, one on each side of the whole breadth, in front, and the half breadth is put in behind. The slit is torn down the middle of the half breadth, and is 4 nails long. Fifth size, for a girl eight or ten, 1} breadth. The breadth is gored, and the whole breadth torn in half; a gore is sewed on each side between the two half breadths. Slit behind 3 nails deep, in the middle of the breadth, behind. Sixth size, for a child five or six, 1} or 2 breadths, sewed simply together without goring. Slit 3 nails long behind. Petticoats are variously made up. The most usual way is plaiting the top in regular folds on each side, letting it be quite plain, or nearly so, in front; it is then set firmly into a linen, calico, or jean band, of the proper width to encircle the waist, and of 1 nail deep when doubled and turned in. Strong tapes are sewed to the ends of the band, and sometimes a large button-hole is made in the band, about 2 nails from the end, through which the tape of the opposite end is drawn, which makes the petticoat set neatly to the figure. Another manner is to make the petticoat up without any slit behind, so as to be a round skirt; a band of the same size is set on quite plainly, without plait or fulness (see Fig. 8). A runner is made all round in the middle of the band, and two button-holes for the strings to come out of, are made at the two sides of the petticoat under the arm; one tape is sewed firmly down at the end of one of the buttonholes, carried all round the petticoat, and drawn out again at the same hole; the other tape, in a similar manner, is sewed down at the other button-hole: when the petticoat is on, and the tapes drawn and tied in front, the fulled part lies behind, forming a sort of bustle to set off the dress properly (see Fig. 9).

The tops for children's petticoats are generally a kind of stay, to which the skirt is either sewed or fastened by means of buttons, and to which the drawers button also. For children's stays, see Plate 11.

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Pockets are either worn tied round the waist, fastened into the petticoat, or buttoned upon the stays. When fastened into the petticoat, they are made of the same material, otherwise of dimity, calico, jean, twilled muslim, and sometimes of nankeen or brown jean.

Take a doubled piece of six nails width-way, and seven mails selvage-way when doubled, and cut according to Fig. 10. For this purpose, double the folded piece in half width-way, and slope off from A to B one nail. The hole in the pocket is slit down about four nails, beginning at three-quarters of a nail from the top. Cut the slit in the shape of an I, in order to allow of a deep hem being made on each side. The two pieces of the pocket are run firmly together all round, at a little distance from the edge, on the wrong side. It is then turned inside out, the seam well flattened, and back-stitched all round with white silk, about a quarter of an inch from the edge. The top is set into a broad piece of tape, which is doubled over it and forms the strings also. The slit is hemmed or back-stitched neatly down. Sometimes an inner pocket or pockets are made for a watch, &c., and this is done by sewing a square piece of the material inside the pocket. The top is left open, but the sides and bottom of it are firmly sewed down.

ANOTHER POCKET.

PLATE 10. FIG. 11.

This differs from the other merely in having the slit cut the contrary way, so as to open width, instead of lengthwise.

A NOT H E R POC KET.
PLATE 10. FIG. 13, 14.

This shape is preferred by some persons, as it sets better to the figure than the others. The straight side is worn in front; and, in cutting out a pair of pockets, care must be taken to make them for the right and left side. The shape is exactly the same as Fig. 10, excepting that, after they are cut out, a gore is taken off from the one side and sewed on to the other, by which means the one is straight and the other, in consequence of the addition, is very much sloped. When pockets are fastened into gowns and petticoats, they are a little fulled at the top, and the slit of the pocket is sewed to the corresponding slit of the petticoat. Some people cut out the slit for the pocket differently, as they are considered to lie flatter to the person than the usual shaped pocket. It is formed by making an oblong bag or pocket, about eight nails long and five nails wide, and cutting at one end, in a slanting direction, so as to take off a triangular piece. To save waste, it is better to make two pockets at once, letting the oblong piece be still five nails wide, when doubled, but fifteen nails long (see Fig. 12); crease it in half its length, and then cut, in a slanting direction, across from A to B. The part cut forms the slit or opening to the pocket, which is sewed all round to the slit in the petticoat or gown.

ANOTHER METHOD.

This is simply a lining or square piece of calico, about ten nails wide and eight nails deep, sewed to the inside of the petticoat quite plainly. The petticoat has a slit of four nails deep. L

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