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ADDISON.

eyen peace itself is, in some measure, obliged to it pour, and if you could recommend re effects,

mainder of my days in the arms of some der bid fair; and I hope you will allow me to represent This, as I take it, would be following the ruas commended the accomplished to the favour of the crcature, and upon a pretty estate in the coal cessary to the forming a gentleman. I need not who, at the cod of a war, left the camp tam tell you that in France, whose fashions we have the plough. I am, sir, with all imaginable ne, ale

a friend in the country. Here is a rich

the neighbourhood, who has made fools of all other respects some of the most shining characters fox-hunters within fifty miles of her. She deler

she intends to marry, but has not yet brood
army not only gives a man opportunities by the man she could like. She usually doabey

humble adınircrs to an audience or two; baile
she has once given them denial, will brite

I am assured by a lemak om

but I cannot perceive him: on the left hand, where of exercising those two great virtues, paliete za he does work, but I cannot behold himn : he hideth courage, but often produces them in mind ateity opene himself on the right hand that I cannot see him *,' they had scarce any footing before. I mesta. In short, reason as well as revelation assures us that it is one of the best schools in the world to har that he cannot be absent from us, notwithstanding ceive a general notion of mankind in, and are he is undiscovered by us.

tain freedom of behaviour, which is not 0 23 In this consideration of God Almighty's omni- acquired in any other place. At the same tice 251 bat presence and omniscience every uncomfortable must own, that some military airs are pretirano rastied thought vanishes.

He cannot but regard every traordinary, and that a man who goes iste a pod. thing that has being, especially such of his crea army a coxcomb will come out of it a un o' tures who fear they are not regarded by him. He public nuisance: but a man of sense, or ear: 1 SPECT is privy to all their thoughts, and to that anxiety had not been sufficiently used to a mixed comincere sig of heart in particular which is apt to trouble them tion, generally takes the true turn. The cost

and beir on this occasion: for, as it is impossible he should in all ages been allowed to be the standard di overlook any of his creatures, so we may be con-good-breeding; and I believe there is not a je modo fident that he regards, with an eye of mercy, those observation in Monsieur Rochefoucault, than this bob who endeavour to recommend themselves to his “ a man who has been bred up wholly to bil na notice, and in an unfeigncd humility of heart think can never get the air of a courtier at cnet, tettelse: themselves unworthy that he should be mindful of will immediately catch it in the camp." The Hisill them +.

son of this most certainly is, that tbe very cosbe of good-breeding and politeness consists in seved that are in niceties, which are so minote that they escape he

observation, and he falls short of the original a la sf the N° 566. MONDAY, JULY 12, 1714.

would copy after; but when he sets the best and 2 things charged and aggravated to a faoli, ke arders for

sooner endeavours to come up to the paller utab pisto Militiæ species amor est.

is set before him, than, though he stops sonen were and a OVID. Ars Am. I. ii. ver. 233.

short of that, he naturally rests where in realita Love is a kind of warfare.

ought. I was, two or three days ago, ap'

pleased with the observation of a buiorow As my correspondents begin to grow pretty nume

tleman upon one of his friends, who was in the rous, I think myself obliged to take some notice of respects every way an accomplished person, to eat them, and shall therefore make this paper a mis he wanted nothing but a dash of the corres a cellany of letters.

I have, since my re-assuming him; by which he understood a little of that are the office of Spectator, received abundance of epis ness and uncolicern in the common actions

of tles from gentlemen of the blade, who I find have which is usually so visible among gentlemen of a been so used to action that they know not how to

army, and which a campaign or two would iís lie still. They seem generally to be of opinion that bly have given him. the fair at home ought to reward them for their

You will easily guess, sir, by this mg services abroad, and that, till the cause of their syric upon a inilitary education, that I am ** country calls them into the field, they have a sort

a soldier; and indeed I am so. I remember, wit of right to quarter themselves upon the ladies. In in three years after I had been in the area, order to favour their approaches, I am desired by ordered into the country a recruiting. I tad uz a testisome to enlarge upon the accomplishments of their particular success in this part of the service, and the profession, and by others to give them iny advice

was over and above assured, at my going a Tale in the carrying on their attacks. But let us hear

that I might have taken a young lady, ako sa what the gentlemen say for themselves.

the most considerable fortune in the counir, als wil

with me. MR SPECTATOR,

time to all other considerations; and, iborghin « Tnough it may look somewhat perverse amidst

not absolutely bent on a wooden leg, reabirds the arts of peace to talk too much of war, it is but least to get a scar or two for the good of forme gratitude to pay the last office to its manes, since

I have at present as much desire of this sort of ** for its being

should be well enough contented to pass the "You have, in your former papers, always rebeen formerly so fond of, almost every one derives his pretences to merit from the sword; and that a man has scarce the face to make his court to a lady, without some credentials from the service to recommend him. As the profession is very ancient,

MR. SPECTATOR,
we have reason to think some of the greatest men
among the old Romans derived many of their vir-
tuies from it, the commanders being frequently in
The

* Job xxiii. 8, &c
+ See Nos. 571, 580, 590, and 628.

them more.

I preferred the pursuit of fane at that

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Your most obedient,

humble servaat,

RILL SALUT

'I Au an half-pay officer, and am at pressive

of the age.

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I shall have fair play at her; but as my whole to fill up a blank space, or make out a word that ess depends on my first approaches, i desire has only the first or last letter to it. - advice, wbether I had best storm, or proceed Some of our authors indeed, when they would be ay of sap.

more satirical than ordinary, omit only the vowels I am, sir,

of a great man's name, and fall most unmercifully * Yours, &c.' upon all the consonants. This way of writing was

first of all introduced by T-m Br-wn *, of face. .S. I bad forgot to tell you that I have al- tious memory, who, after having gutted a proper y carried one of her out-works, that is, secured name of all its intermediate vowels, used to plant maid.'

it in his works, and make as free with it as he

pleased, without any danger of the statute. MR, SPECTATOR,

That I may imitate these celebrated authors, and ave assisted in several sieges in the Low Coun- publish a paper which shall be more taking than , and being still willing to employ my talents ordinary, I have here drawn up a very curious soldier and engineer, lay down this morning libel, in which a reader of penetration will find a even o'clock before the door of an obstinate great deal of concealed satire, and if he be acale, who had for some time refued me admit- quainted with the present posture of affairs, will e. I made a lodgment in an outer parlour easily discover the meaning of it. it twelve: the enemy retired to her bed-cham

If there are four persons in the nation who enyet I still pursued, and about two o'clock this deavour to bring all things into confusion, and ruin rooon she ihought fit to capitulate. Her de their native country, I think every honest Englishds are indeed somewhat high, in relation to man ought to be upon his guard. That there are settlement of ber fortune. But, being in pos. such every one will agree with me, who hears me on of the house, I inteod to insist upon carte dame ***, with his first friend and favourite ***, iche, and am in hopes, by keeping off all other not to mention *** nor ***. These people may enders for the space of twenty-four hours, to cry ch-rch, ch-rch, as long as they please ; but, ve her into a compliance. I beg your speedy to make use of a homely proverb, " The proof of ce, and am,

the p-dd-ng is in the eating.' This I am sure SIR, yours,

of, that if a certain prince should concur with a PETER PUSH.

certain prelate (and we have Monsieur 2-o's From my camp in Red-lion-square, Saturday,

word for it), our posterity would be in a sweet in the afternoon.'

P-ckle. Must the British nation suffer, forsooth, because my Lady Q-p-t-s has been disobliged Or is it reasonable that our English feet, which used to be the terror of the ocean, should lie wind.

bound for the sake of a - I love to speak • 567. WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 1714.

out, and declare my mind clearly, when I am talk.

ing for the good of my country. I will not make - Inceptus clamor frustratur hiantes.

my court to an ill-man, though he were a B-y VIRG. Æn. vi. ver. 493.

or a T--t. Nay, I would not stick to call se -The weak voice deceives their gasping throats.

wretched a politician a traitor, an enemy to his DRYDEN.

country, and a bl-nd-rb-ss, &c. &c.' ave received private advice from some of my which is written after the manner of the most cele

The remaining part of this political treatise, respondents, that if I would give my paper a eral run I should take care to season it with brated authors in Great Britain, I may communindal. I have indeed observed of late that few cate to the public at a more convenient season, tings sell which are not filled with great names In the meanwhile I shall leave this with my curious | illustrious titles. The reader generally casts reader, as some ingenious writers do their enig. eye upon a new book, and, if he finds several mas; and, if any sagacious person can fairly un. iers separated from one another by a dash, he riddle it, I will print his explanation, and, if he is it up and peruses it with great satisfaction, pleases, acquaint the world with his name. M and an h, a T and an r *, with a short line I hope this short essay will convince my readers ween them, has sold many insipid pamphlets

. it is not for want of abilities that I avoid state y, I have known a whole edition go off by tracts, and that, if I would apply my mind to it, tue of two or three well-written &c

I might in a little time be as great a master of the A sprinkling of the words.faction, Frenchman, political scratch as any the most eminent writer pist, plunderer,' and the like significant terins of the age.. I shall only add, that in order to out. an Italic character, have also a very good effect shine all this modern race of syncopists, and tho. on the eye of the purchaser; not to mention roughly content my English reader, I intend shortly cribbler, liar, rogue, rascal, knave, and villain," to publish a Spectator that shall not have a single thout whicb it is impossible to carry on a mo

vowel in it. * controversy. Our party-writers are so sensible of the secret

Tom Brown. tue of an innuendo to recommend their producns, that of late they never mention the Q-n P-tat length, though they speak of them th honour, and with that deference which is due them from every private person. It gives a ret satisfaction to a peruser of those mysterious arks that he is able to decipher them without P, and, by the strength of his own natural parts,

-S.

ADDISON.

M and an b means Marlborough, and a T and an 1ns Treasurer.

my Lady Q-p-t-s's name ; 'bot boxerer,

* he has inade a little amends for it is his beste N° 568. FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1714. tence, where be leaves a blank space ***

much as a consonant to direct us. I mean,

"after those words, " the fleet that used to Dram recitas, incipit esse tuus. MART. Epig. 39. L I.

terror of the ocean, sborld be wind-bound

sake of a--;" after which ensues a chai Reciting makes it th.ne.

in my opinion looks modest enough,

iny antagonist, you may easily know hiss I was yesterday in a coffee-house not far from the bý bis gaping; I suppose be designs bs Royal Exchange, where I observed three persones you call it, for an bole to creep est al, bu in close conference over a pipe of tobacco; upon lieve it will hardly serve his teru. W 2* which, having filled one for my own use, I lighted dare to see the great officers of tale, u it at the little war-candle that stood before them; and T-ts, treated after so scurrilous a and, after having thrown in two or three whils I can't for my life,' says I, imagine si amongst them, sat down and made one of the com- are the Spectator means, '-- No! says be-3 pany. I need not tell my reader that lighting a humble servant, sir! Upon which he for man's pipe at the same candle is looked upon self back in his chair after a contemptuos among brother smokers as an overture to conver- and smiled upon the old lethargie geatkez sation and friendship. As we here laid our heads his left hand, who I found was his great wa together in a very amicable manner, being en- The whig however had begun to conceive a: trenched under a cloud of our own raising, I took will towards me, and, seeing my pipe cel up the last Spectator, and casting my eye over it,' generously offered me the use of bis bon, • The Spectator,' says !, * is very witty to-day; declined it with great civility, being obite upon which a lusty lethargic old gentleman, who meet a friend about that time in another as sat at the upper end of the table, having gradually of the city, blown out of tris mouth a great deal of smoke At my leaving the coffee-house, I could be which he had been collecting for some time before, bear retiecting with myself upeo that gress

Ay,' savs he, more wilty than wise, I am afraid.' fools who may be termed the over-***, and His neighbour, wbo sat at his right hand, immedi- the ditheulty of writing any thing in this case ntely coloured, and being an angry politiciar, lard age, which a weak b-ad ma foi construe down his pipe with so much wrath that he broke vate satire and personal reflection, it in the middle, and by that means furnished me A man who has a good nose at an with a tobacco-topper. I took it op very sedate smells treason and sedition in the must be ly, and, looking bim full in the face, made use of words that can be put together, and Bever it from time to time all the while he was speaking: vice or folly stigmatised, but tiads out ode 64 * This fellow,' says he can't for his life keep out of his acquaintance pointed at by the writer of politics. Do you see how he abuses four great remember an empty pragmatical fellow u men here!' I fixed my eye very attentively on country, who, upon reading over The Whale the paper, and asked him if he meant those who of Man, had written the names of several peos were represented by asterisks. • Asterisks,' says in the village at the side of every sin u hicho he, do you call them? they are all of them stars tioned by that excellent author; sa that he might as well have put garters to them. Then converted one of the best books in the word pray do but mind the two or three next lines. a libel against the 'squire, churchwarders, stere Ch-ch and p-dd-ng in the same sentence! Our of the poor, and all other the most cur clergy are very much beholden to him!' l'pon this persons in the parish. This book, with the the third gentleman, who was of a mild disposition, iraordinary marginal notes, fell accidentally and, as I found, a whig in his heart, desired him the hands of one who had bever seen a bete not to be too severe upon the Spectator neither ; upon w bich there arose a current report that en * for,' says he, you find he is very cantious of body had written a book against tre square a giving offence, and has therefore put two dashes the whole parish. The minister of the place to into his podding. • A fig før his dash,' says the ing at that tiune a controversy with soset angry politician; in his next sentences he gives a corgregation upon the account of his tubes. plain innuendo that our posterity will be in a sweet under some suspicion of being the auther, tils p-ckle. What does the fool mean by his pickle: good man set the people right, by showing the Why does he not write it at length, if be mean that the satirical passages might be appleed te honestly? I have read over the whole sentence, veral others of two or tbree neighbouring van say: 1; but look upon the parenthesis in the and that the book was written against all the belly of it to be the most dangerous part, and as vers in England. fall of insinuations as it can hold. But who,' says

ADDISON, 1, is my Lady Q-p-t-s? Ay, answer that if you can, sir,' says the furious statesinan to the

poor wbig that sat over against him. But without giving bim time to reply, I do assure you,' says he,

were I my Lady Q-p-t-s, I would sve bien for scandalum magnatum. What is the world come to? Must every body be allowed to-- He had by this time filled a new pipe, and applying it to his lips, when we expected the last word of his sentence, put us off with a whiff of tobacco; which he redoubled with so much rage and trepidation that he almost stifled the whole company. After a short pause, I owned that I thought the Spectator kad gone too far in the writing so many letters of

sopher that his wife was not handsome, Pat less

water in your wine,' says the philosopher, 'and N° 569. MONDAY, JULY 19, 1714. you will quickly make her so.' Wine heightens

indifference into love, love into jealousy, and jeaReges dicuntur multis urgere culullis

lousy into madness. It often turns the good-natured Et torqucre mero, quem persperise laborent, man into an idiot, and the choleric into an assassin. en sit amicitia dignus

It gives bitterness to resentment, it makes vanity HOR. Ars Poet. ver. 434.

insupportable, and displays every little spot of the Wise were the kings who never chose a friend

soul in its utmost deformity. Till with full cup they had unmask'd his soul, And seen the bottom of his deepest thoughts.

Nor does this vice only betray the hidden faults ROSCOMMON.

of a man, and show them in the most odious co

lours, but often occasions faults to which he is not ices are so incurable as those which men are naturally subject. There is more of turn than of o glory in. One would wonder how drun- truth in a saying of Seneca, that drunkenness does ss should have the good luck to be of this not produce but discover faults. Common expe. er. Anacharsis being invited to a match of rience teaches the contrary. Wine throws a man ing at Corinth, deinanded the prize very hu- out of himself, and infuses qualities into the mind usly, because he was drunk before any of the which she is a stranger to in her sober moments. of the company; ' for,' says he, when we The person you converse with, after the third botrace, he who arrives at the goal first is en- tle, is not the same man who at first sat down at

to the reward:' on the contrary, in this table with you. Upon this maxim is founded one y generation, the honour falls upon him who of the preitiest sayings I ever met with, which is 's off the greatest quantity of liquor, and ascribed to Publius Syrus, ' Qui ebrium ludificat, is down the rest of the company. I was the ladit absentem :' • He who jests upon a man that is day with honest Will Funnel the West Saxon, drunk injures the absent.' mas reckoning up how much liquor had passed Thus does drunkenness act in a direct contradicgh him in the last twenty years of his life, tion to reason, whose business it is to clear the mind i, according to his computation, amounted to of every vice which is crept into it, and to guard y-three hogsheads of October, four ton of it against all the approaches of any that endeahalf a kilderkin of small beer, nineteen bar-vours to make its entrance. But besides these ill f cider, and three glasses of champagne; be-effects which this vice prodaces in the person who which he had assisted at four hundred bowls is actually under its dominion, it has also a bad ininch, not to mention sips, drams, and whets fuence on the mind even in its sober moments, as ut nunber. I question pot but every reader's it insensibly weakens the understanding, impairs vry will suggest to him several ambitious young the memory, and makes those faults habitual which who are as vain in this particular as Will are produced by frequent excesses. el, and can boast of as glorious exploits. I should now proceed to show the ill effects which r modern philosophers observe, that there is a this vice has on the bodies and fortunes of men ; al decay of moisture in the globe of the earth. but these I shall reserve for the subject of some they chiefly ascribe to the growth of vegeta- future paper. which incorporate into their own substance duid bodies that never return again to their r natare: but, with submission, they ought to

into their account those innumerable raI beings which fetch their sourishment chiefly No 570. WEDNESDAY, JULY 21, 1714. f liquids ; especially when we consider that compared with their fellow-creatures, drink more than comes to their share.

--Nugæque canore. 1, however highly this tribe of people may

HOR. Ars Poet, ver. 32% of themselves, a drunken man is a greater Chiming trifles. er than any that is to be found among all the

ROSCOMMON. ares which God has made; as indeed there is aracter which appears more despicable and THERE is scarce a man living who is not actuated med, in the eyes of all reasonable persons, by ambition. When this principle meets with an that or a drunkard. Bonosus, one of our own honest mind and great abilities, it does infinite serrymen, who was addicted to this vice, having vice to the world; on the contrary, when a man

for a share in the Roman empire, and being only thinks of distinguishing himself without being ted in a great battle, hanged himself. When thus qualified for it, he becomes a very pernicious as seen by the army in this melancholy situa- or a very ridiculous creature. I shall here confine not withstanding he had behaved himself very myself to that petty kind of ambition, by which ly, the common jest was, that the thing they some men grow eminent for odd accomplishinents langing upon the tree before then was not a and trivial performances. How many are there but a bottle.

whose whole reputation depends upon a pun or a is vice has very fatal effects on the mind, the quibble? You inay often see an artist in the streets 1 and fortune, of the person who is devoted gain a circle of admirers by carrying a long pole

upon his chin or forehead in a perpendicular posregard to the mind, it first of all Jiscovers ture. Ambition has taught some to write with their flaw in it. The sober man, by the strength feet, and others to walk upon their hands. Some ason, may keep under and subdue every vice tumble into fame, and others grow immortal by ly to which he is most inclined; but wine throwing themselves through a boop. Es every latent seed sprout up in the soul, and

itself; it gives fory to the passions, and force Cætera de genere hoc adeo sunt multa, loquacem lose objects which are apt to produce them. Delassare valent Fubium

HOR. Sat. i. 1. 1. ver. 18. n a young fellow complained to an old philo

ADDISON.

my Lady Q-p-t-s's name; ' but bowever," =

he has made a little ameods for it in his per N° 568. FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1714. tence, where he leaves a blank spare :

much as a consonant to direct us. I mean, wat

after those words, “ the fleet that wed to >> Dim recitas, incipit esse tuu.

terror of the ocean, should be wind-band how MAKT. Epig. 39. LI.

sake of a--;" after which ensues a cha Reciting makes it th.se.

in my opinion looks modest enough,' — Ni.

my antagonist, you may easily know bisa I was yesterday in a coffee-house not far from the by bis gaping; I suppose be dexigos basc Royal Exchange, where I observed three persons you call it, for an bole to creep eat at, in close conference over a pipe of tobacco; upon lieve it will hardly serve his tara. Who z which, baving filled one for my owo use, I lighteddore to see the great officers of statr, it at the little wax-candle that stood before them; and T-t's, treated after so scurriless a s and, after having thrown in two or three whils I can't for my life,' says I, imagine s amongst them, sat down and made one of the com- are the Spectator means.- No! says be. pany. I need not tell my reader that lighting a humble servant, sir! Upon which he for map's pipe at the same candle is looked upon self back in his chair after a coatemptos - among brother smokers as an overture to conver- and smiled upon the old lethargic gesties sation and friendship. As we bere laid our heads his left hand, who I found was his great as together in a very amicable manner, being en- The whig bowever had begun to conceive as trenched under a cloud of our own raising, I took will towards me, and, seeing my pipe at up the last Spectator, and casting my eye over it, generously offered me the use of bis bor. • The Spectator,' says I, 'is very witty to-day : | declined it with great civility, being obha upon which a lusty lethargic old gentleman, who meet a friend about that time in anotac u sat at the upper end of the table, having gradually of the city. blown out of bris mouth a great deal of smoke At my leaving the coffee-house, I could ta which he had been collecting for some time before, bear relecting with myself upon that grex trs * Ay,' says he, ‘more witty than wise, I am afraid.'| fools who may be termed the over-* *, and His neighbour, who sat at his right hand, immedi- the dithculty of writing any thing in this con ately coloured, and being an angry politiciar, lad age, which a weak b-ad mav tot costre we down his pipe with so much wrath ibat he broke vate satire and personal reflection. it in the middle, and by that means furnished me A man who has a good pose at an with a tobacco-stopper. I took it up very sedate smells tsea.on and sedition to the most insert 1y, and, lookins bim full in the face, made use of words that can be put together, and Devet it from time to time all the while he was speaking: vice or folly stigmatised, bat finds oat one era • This fellow,' says he can't for his life keep out of his acquaintance pointed at by the writer of politics, Do you see how he abuses four great remember an empty pragmatical fellow mco bere! I fixed my eye very attentively on country, who, opon reading over The Whole in the paper, and asked him if he meant those who of Man, bad written the names of several per were represented by asterisks. • Asterisks,' says in the village at the side of every sis which he, do you call them? they are all of them stars tioned by that excellent author; so that he he might as well have put garters to them. Then converted one of the best books in the social pray do but mind the two or three next lines. a libel against the 'squire, cburebwardens, svens Ch.ch and p-dd-ng in the same sentence! Our of the poor, and all other the most considera clergy are very much beholden to him!' l'pon this persons in the parish. This boak, with the the third gentleman, # bo was of a mild disposition, traordimury marginal Botes, fell accidental and, as I found, a whig in his heart, desired him the hands of one who had bever seen u ka not to be too severe upon the Spectator neither ; upon which there arose a current report that = ' for,' says he, . you find he is very cantious of body had written a book against the squires giving offence, and has there fore put two dashes the whole parish. The minister of the place, to into his pudding. “A fig for his dash,' says the ing at that time a controversy with same angry politician; ' in his next sentences he gives a congregation upon the account of his prers. plain indvendo that our post-rity will be in a sweet under some suspicion of being the author, ta p-ekle. What does the fool mean by his pichler good man set the people right, by showing Why does he not write it at length, if he means that the satirical passages might be appled to honestly? I have read over the whole sentence, veral others of two or three weighbourug vik kay: l; but I look upon the parenthesis in the and that the book was written against all the belly of it to be the most dangerous part, and as oen in England. full of insinuations as it can hold. But who,' says

ADDISON. 1, is my Lady Q-p-i-?As, answer that if you can, sir,' says the furious statesman to the poor whig that sat over against him. But without giving bim time to reply, I do assure you,' is be, I were I my Lady Q-p-t, I would sue hiin for Sandalumi magnatum. What is the world come to? Must every body be allowed to?" He had by this time filled a new pipe, and applying it to bis lips, when we expected the last word of his sen. tence, put us off with a whilf of tobacco; which he redoubled with so much rage and trepidation that he almost stifled the whole company. After a short pause, I owned that I thought the Spectator kad gone too far in the writing so many letters of

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