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No. 27.

WASHINGTON, February 3, 1904. The following instructions for the inspection of fresh beef delivered for use of the Army are published for the information and guidance of all concerned:

Specifications : “The beef shall be good in quality and condition, fit for immediate use, and from fore and hind quarter meat proportionally, including all the best cuts thereof. Necks shall be cut off at the fourth vertebral joint, and breasts trimmed down; the shank of fore quarters shall be cut off four inches above the knee joint, and of hind quarters eight inches above the hock joint. Necks, shanks, and kidney tallow, and beef from bulls and stags, and from females (except from spayed heifers) shall be excluded from delivery. The carcass of a beef when dressed should weigh not less than 500 pounds."

Cat No. 1 illustrates the retail method of cutting beef and shows the comparative weights and values of the various cuts.

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No. 1.-RETAIL METHOD OF CUTTING BEEF. Cut No. 2 illustrates the wholesale methods of cutting beef and gives the comparative weights and values of the various cuts.

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By a study of Cut No. 3, the inspector can become familiar with the nomenclature of the various parts of the animal on the hoof.

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NO 3.

1-Forehead and face. 12-Fore ribs. 2-Muzzle.

13-Back ribs. 3-Nostrils.

14-Crops. 4-Eyes.

15-Loin. 5-Ears.

16-Back. 6-Poll.

17-Hooks. 7-Jaws.

18–Rumps. 8-Throat.

19-Hind quarters. 9-Shoulders.

20-Thighs. 10-Chest.

21-Twist. 11-Brisket.

22-Base of tail.

23-Cod purse. 24-Underline. 25--Flanks. 26-Legs and bones 27-Hocks. 28-Fore arms. 29-Neck vein. 30-Bush of tail. 31-Heart girth. 32--Pin bones.

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A careful study of these cuts will enable the inspector to know what cats are being delivered, and to insist that the delivery be" from fore and hind quarter meat proportionally, including all the best cuts thereof."

The condition of the meat, and the age and sex of the animal from which it is taken is a more difficult question to determine, but a study of the few simple rules here given will enable the inspector to see that the meat delivered is according to specifications.

Both dark-red lean meat and yellow fat indicate age; while light-red lean meat and white fat indicate youth. The mar. row in the bones of a young animal is soft and red, and that of an old animal is hard and light in color. Soft, wbite, and wide cartilage indicates a young animal, while hard, dark and thin cartilage indicates an old animal. Looking along the backbone the character of the cartilage between the vertebræ can be easily determined. This cartilage generally becomes hard at the age of six or seven years. The cartilage of the breastbone becomes bard in an old animal.

In the female the size and condition of the udder show the relative age. The adder of the heifer shows a clean cut and a firm, uniform mass in either flank, while that of the cow pre. sents a more or less flabby appearance. Sometimes the udder of an old cow is removed, some fat taken from a steer substi. tuted therefor, and the flank is skewered over it in such a way as to resemble the udder of a beifer. The presence of skewers in the udder should arouse suspicion, and the appearance of the rest of the carcass should give conclusive proof of this deception.

The carcass of a bull shows massive shoulders, thick bulging neck and broad breast. It shows a more rounded rump and has darker and coarser meat than a steer, cow, or heifer. In the case of the bull there is an absence of scrotal fat. The fore quarters of a bull are relatively larger than bis hind quarters.

The carcass of a steer should show youth. Its flesh should be florid in color and firm and elastic to the touch and lighter in color than that of a cow. Its most distinctive feature is the bunch of fat known as the "cod,” which is enveloped in the scrotum.

In all male carcasses the section of the pelvis or “rump" bone shown in the hind quarter is more or less curved. At the outer end of this section is a crescent-shaped piece of lean meat, sometimes separated from the end of the bone by a little fat.

In female carcasses the section of the pelvis or “rump"

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bone, as shown in the hind quarter, is nearly straight, the amount of curvature decreasing with the age of the animal. At the outer end of this section no lean meat is visible. A "spayed " heifer's carcass generally shows the scar in the flank.

Excessive moisture, which is mostly observed in flanks, abdomen, under the shoulder blade, and at the brisket, in the order named, is particularly noticeable in the carcasses of old cows or any animal that is ill conditioned. BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

ADNA R. CHAFFEE,

Lieutenant General, Chief of Staj. OFFICIAL: W. P. HALL,

Acting Adjutant General.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT,
No. 28.

WASHINGTON, February 4, 1904. The following is published to the Army for the information and guidance of all concerned:

The President of the United States, by order dated January 25, 1904, under authority of "An act to provide for the disposal of abandoned and useless military reservations,” approved July 3,1884 (1 Sup. Rev. Stats., 453), placed under the control of the Interior Department, for disposition under said act, or as may be otherwise provided by law, all the lands of the military reservation of Fort Egbert, Alaska, as declared by Executive order of Jane 13, 1899 (General Orders, No. 119, Headquarters of the Army, Adjutant General's Office, June 30, 1899), enlarged by Executive order of March 31, 1900 (General Orders, No. 48, Headquarters of the Army, Adjutant General's Office, April 12, 1900), and reduced by Executive order of July 23, 1900 (General Orders, No. 109, Headquarters of the Army, Adjutant General's Office, August 14, 1900), except the lands included within the following boundaries, which are to be retained for military purposes, viz:

Commencing at a post at the mouth of Mission Creek, marked "U. S. M. R:" thence due west two miles; thence due south two miles; thence due east three miles; thence due north to the left bank of the Yukon River; thence along the left bank of said river to the place of beginning. BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:

ADNA R. CHAFFEE,

Lieutenant General, Chief of Staff OFFICIAL: W. P. HALL,

Acting Adjutant General.

FEB 18 Pendi

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