The Merchant of Venice, Svazek 1

Přední strana obálky
Library of Alexandria, 1750

In sooth, I know not why I am so sad;_It wearies me; you say it wearies you;_But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,_What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born,_I am to learn;_And such a want-wit sadness makes of me_That I have much ado to know myself._
SALARINO._Your mind is tossing on the ocean;_There where your argosies, with portly sailÑ_Like signiors and rich burghers on the flood,_Or as it were the pageants of the seaÑ_Do overpeer the petty traffickers,_That curtsy to them, do them reverence,_As they fly by them with their woven wings._
SALANIO._Believe me, sir, had I such venture forth,_The better part of my affections would_Be with my hopes abroad. I should be still_Plucking the grass to know where sits the wind,_Peering in maps for ports, and piers, and roads;_And every object that might make me fear_Misfortune to my ventures, out of doubt_Would make me sad._
SALARINO._My wind, cooling my broth_Would blow me to an ague, when I thought_What harm a wind too great might do at sea._I should not see the sandy hour-glass run_But I should think of shallows and of flats,_And see my wealthy Andrew dock'd in sand,_Vailing her high top lower than her ribs_To kiss her burial. Should I go to church_And see the holy edifice of stone,_And not bethink me straight of dangerous rocks,_Which, touching but my gentle vessel's side,_Would scatter all her spices on the stream,_Enrobe the roaring waters with my silks,_And, in a word, but even now worth this,_And now worth nothing? Shall I have the thought_To think on this, and shall I lack the thought_That such a thing bechanc'd would make me sad?_But tell not me; I know Antonio_Is sad to think upon his merchandise.

 

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Strana 8 - Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff : you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
Strana 58 - It must not be; there is no power in Venice Can alter a decree established: 'Twill be recorded for a precedent; And many an error, by the same example, Will rush into the state: it cannot be.
Strana 14 - If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him. He hates our sacred nation, and he rails, Even there where merchants most do congregate, On me, my bargains, and my well-won thrift, Which he calls interest. Cursed be my tribe If I forgive him ! Bass.
Strana 65 - In such a night Stood Dido with a willow in her hand Upon the wild sea-banks, and waft her love To come again to Carthage.
Strana 54 - You may as well go stand upon the beach, And bid the main flood bate his usual height ; You may as well use question with the wolf, Why he hath made the ewe bleat for the lamb...
Strana 58 - I will be bound to pay it ten times o'er, On forfeit of my hands, my head, my heart: If this will not suffice, it must appear That malice bears down truth. And I beseech you, Wrest once the law to your authority: To do a great right, do a little wrong, And curb this cruel devil of his will.
Strana 16 - Shylock, we would have moneys : ' you say so ; You, that did void your rheum upon my beard And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur Over your threshold : moneys is your suit. What should I say to you ? Should I not say ' Hath a dog money ? is it possible A cur can lend three thousand ducats...
Strana 66 - For do but note a wild and wanton herd, Or race of youthful and unhandled colts, Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud, Which is the hot condition of their blood ; If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound, Or any air of music touch their ears, You shall perceive them make a mutual stand, Their savage eyes turn'd to a modest gaze By the sweet power of music...
Strana 14 - Yes, to smell pork ; to eat of the habitation which your prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into. I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following ; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you.
Strana 6 - Because you are not merry: and 'twere as easy For you to laugh and leap and say you are merry, Because you are not sad. Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes And laugh like parrots at a bag-piper, And other of such vinegar aspect That they'll not show their teeth in way of smile, Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable.

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