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OF THE

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The Twenty-Fifth Volume of the KNICKERBOCKER commenced with the number for January, 1843. The Proprietor does not deem it necessary, in announcir.g this fact, to enter into an elaborate statement of the claims which it is believed to present to the · favor of the American reading public. The work is thoroughly known and widely patronized throughout the United States, and has many readers in other countries. It has always embodied original communications from the first writers of America, with those of others of our countrymen less known to fame, certainly, but who have also established in its pages a wide and enviable literary reputation. Its list of more than a hundred contributors, including several eminent writers from abroad, is wholly unequalled by any native periodical. What American Magazine (or European either, for that matter) beside the KNICKERBOCKER, ever presented in a single nuinber articles from WashinGTON IRVING, COOPER, BRYANT, HALLECK, LONGFELLOW, WHITTIER, STREET, General Cass, and the American in Paris ?'-or a galaxy of more gifted writers of any country? Not one, it is confidently asserted. It should be added, moreover, that the most eminent of its contributors are not the least frequently encountered in the KNICKENBOCKER. Mr. IRVING had an average of three articles in the different departments of each number of the work, after his permanent connection with it; Mr. COOPER followed up his first paper with others equally spirited ; and it may well be doubted whether Mr. BRYANT has ever penned finer lines than. The Prairies," "The Arctic Lover to his Mistress,' his magnificent poem' The Winds;' his equally noble * Antiquity of Freedom,' an' Evening Reverie, etc., or whether Professor LONGFELLow has ever exceeded his several beautiful Psalms of Life,' or his Saga of the Skeleton in Armor;' or Mr. WARE, his voluminous Letters from Palmyra,' and 'Letters from Rome ;' all of which had their origin in the KNICKERBOCKER. As an evidence that the constant additions which are making to the list of writers for the work are calculated to enhance its reputation, we need only mention the series of Quod Cor. respondence, the papers of Polygon, the Reminiscences of an Old Man,' (The Young Englishman,) the. Edward Alford,' and 'Meadow Farm,' articles, the polished Idleberg Papers, etc., etc. The publisher has not been unmindful of his duty, but has produced the work in a style of typographical neatness and beauty which will challenge comparison with any periodical in the world. It remains only to say, that as it is the oldest, so will the publisher and editor continue to strive to make it the best Magazine in the United States. Permanently established ; with a fervid esprit du corps among its correspondents; and all persons immediately connected with its interests emulous to sustain its character and enhance its value; the KNICKERBOCKER will not for a moment be suffered to flag. Many of its contributors, since its commencement, are named below: WASHINGTON IRVWG, JHON. D.-D. BARNARD,

ALFRED B. STREET, WILLIAM C. BRYANT,

MR. CATHERWOOD, JOHN WATERS, J. FENIMORE COOPER, F. W. EDMONDS,

CONSUL G. W. GREENE, FITZ-GREENE HALLECK, REV. MR. GANNETT, (MASS.) JAMES BROOKS, PROF. H. W.LONGFELLOW, MRS. GILMAN, (8. C.) REV. DR. SPRING, J. K. PAULDING, E.T. T. MARTIN,

J. H. HILLHOUSE,
MISS C. M. SEDGWICK, H. W.ELLSWORTH, J. N. BELLOWS,
JOHN SANDERSON, REV. DR. BEASLEY, DR. R. M. BIRD,
REV. WM. WARE,

H. R. SCHOOLCRAFT, PROFESSOR FÉLTON,
HON. LEWIS CASS,
REV. J. PIERPONT,

STACY G. POTTS,
CAPT. F. MARRYAT, UON. G. C. VERPLANCK, J. G. WHITTIER,
J. H. STEPHENS,

COL. T. S. McKENNY, H. W. ROCKWELL,
SIR E. L. BULWER,
PHILIP HONE,

WILLIAM PITT PALMER, REV. ORVILLE DEWEY, JOHN T. IRVING,

CHARLES M. LEUPP,
HON. R. M. CHARLTON, REV. HENRY BASCOM, PROF. BECK,
JAMES G. PERCIVAL, CHARLES SPRAGUE, MISS M. A. BROWNE,
GOV. W. H. SEWARD, PARK BENJAMIN,

HON. CHARLES MINER, HON. R. H. WILDE, THEODORE S. FAY, DR. A. BRIGHAM, "HARRY FRANCO,

MRS. FANNY K. BUTLER, FREDERICK W. SHELTON, NATH. HAWTHORNE, HON. JAS. KENT,

EDWARD S. GOULD,
MRS. L. H. SIGOURNEY, REV. WALTER COLTON, CHARLES HOFFMAN,
REV. DR. BETHUNE, PRESIDENT DUER, MRS. E. F. ELLET,
MISS LESLIE,
JOSEPH BARBER,

JOHN HUNTER,
W.D.GALLAGHER, MISS H. F. GOULD,

HON. B. W. RICHARDS, HON. JUDGE CONRAD, HON. JUDGE HALL, (ILL.) HORACE GREELEY, DR. O. W. HOLMES, WILLIAM L. STONE, REV. DR. PISE, JOSEPH C. NEAL,

REV. DR. BRANTLEY, GEORGE LUNT, THOS. W. PARSONS, W. GILMOPE SIMMS, H. T. TUCKERMAN, PROF. HITCHCOCK, REV.W.B.O. PEABODY, REV. DR. SCHROEDER, MRS. E. C. EMBURY, Prof. CHARLES ANTHON, W. A. ROGERS.

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Art. I. SKETCHES OF THE GREAT WEST. BY LEWIS C. THOMAS,

II. THE WEEPER'S DREAM. BY WILLIAM WILSON,
III. JOHN WATERS, HIS SPRINGE. BY JOHN WATERS,
IV. THE RANGER'S ADVENTURE. BY A New CONTRIBUTOR,
V. THE WIT'S END:' A RETORT LEGAL,
VI. AN INVITATION. BY ALBERT PIKE, Esq., ·
VII. A RACE ON THE BAHAMA BANKS. By NED BUNTLINE,
VIII. THE ADVENTURE, OR THE SPECULATORS' VICTIM,
IX. THE WALKING GENTLEMAN. NUMBER ONE,

X KNOWING CHARACTERS: GENERAL AND PARTICULAR,
XI. SONNET: MARY, THE MOTHER OF JESUS,'
XII. REQUIEM FOR THE DEPARTED. BY HIRST GRANVILLE,
XIII. BORNHOLM: FROM THE RUSSIAN OF KARAMSIN, BY A. C. BECKER,
XIV. THE SOLDIER'S BRIDE: A TRIBUTE OF AFFECT ION,
XV. A CHAPTER ON LINES. BY A New CONTRIBUTOR,
XVI. STANZAS : NOVEMBER. BY I. M. IDE, JR.,
XVII. DARK ELLSPETH'S LIFE-TALE. By Mrs. J. WEBB. NUMBER Two,
XVIII. THE SHOWER-BATH EVADED: A FRAGMENT,
XIX. WITHIN THE VEIL. By Rev. EDWARD WHITE, HEREFORD, ENGLAND,
XX. THE LOST FAWN : AN AUTHENTIC SKETCH. BY ROPER,
XXI. LINES TO GEN. MIRABEAU B. LAMAR. BY MRS. ANN S. STEPHENS,
XXII. THE ST. LEGER PAPERS. NUMBER Two,
XXIII. THE LADY ANN : A BALLAD. BY JOHN G. SAXE, ESQ.,

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.249

LITERARY NOTICES:

1. NOAH'S DISCOURSE ON THE RESTORATION OF THE JEWS,
2. ADDRESS AND DINNER OF THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, .
3. MAPES' ADDRESS BEFORE THE MECHANICS' INSTITUTE,
4. VESTIGES OF THE NATURAL HISTORY OF CREATION, .

250 255 255

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Editor's TABLE:
1. GENERAL HAMILTON'S SECRET OFFENCE TO COLONEL BURR,

256 2. THE PAYMENT OF THE PENNSYLVANIA INTEREST,

257 3. SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF MUTUAL ADMIRATION,

259 4. RANK TO THE DESERVING : STEAM-ENGINEERS,

266 5. BOOK -KEEPING: OR THE RICH MAN IN SPITE OF HIMSELF,

261 6. THE LATE MATTHEW C. FIELD: 'PHAZMA' AT NIAGARA,

262 7. GOSSIP WITH READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS,

265 1. THE BISHOP' CONTROVERSY. 2. GEORGE JONES AND HIS PROTEGE WILLIAM

SHAKSPEARE. 3. HANS PLACE: Miss LANDON. 4. BACHELOR'S BALL AT THE AsTOR-HOUSE: POETICAL INVITATION TO MARRY. 5. OUR MAGAZINE : PERIODICAL READING. 6. A SERENADE: THE POWER OF MUSIC. 7. A FEBRUARY SNOWSTORM. 8. BOARDING-HOUSES: THE EXEMPLARY LODGER. 9. CANINE LATINITY: A LATIN EPISTLE. 10. Hood's PENSION: THE CAPTAIN'S Cow: SITTING FOR A PORTRAIT. 11. WORDY OR BULKY AUTHORS. 12. WHAT IS ELOQUENCE? Mr. Gough. 13. NATIONAL RAIL-ROAD TO THE PACIFIC. 14. SEEING OURSELVES not AS OTHERS SEE U8:'MR. SMIT.' 15. AMERICAN vs. ENGLISH CONGRESSIONAL MANNERS. 16. THE BARBERS VICTIMS. 17. PREGNANT POETICAL AND PROSE PASSAGES FROM PUNCH. 1'. LANMAN'S LETTERS FROM A LANDSCAPE-PAINTER.' 13. A CONNOISSEUR OF A COUP-DE-PIED. 20. ELEGIAC STANZAS.' 21. MR. LONGFELLOW: GROUNDLESS CHARGE OF PLAGIARISM. 22. A COLLEGE REMINISCENCE: "SABBATH MORNING.' 23. New SHAKSPERIAN READING: THE 'OLD GENTLEMAN IN SPECS.' 24. ROGERS' POEMS AND TASTES: MR. HALLECK. 25. POPULAR PREACHING' 26. TARDY HONORS: MR. QUOZZLE. 27. OUR RELIGIOUS' SHORT-COMINGS. 28. OFFICE-HUNTING. 29. THE LATE LADY HESTER STANHOPE. 30. MR. HENRY INMAN ABROAD. 31. 'RATION ALE' OF Ass's EARS. 32. MUSICAL LATIN COUPLET. 33. “UNBOUGHT SUFFRAGE.' 34. A PLAGIARISM. 35. LIGHT BREAD AND Costs.' 36. DECORATIVE PAINTING. 37. BON-BON MOTTOES. 38. KNEELAND, THE SCULPTOR. 39. • KNICKERBOCKER' PENS. 40. Our New CONTRIBUTORS. 41. EGOTISM OF SMALL AUTHORS. 42. NEWSPAPORIAL MATTERS. 43. PUNCH IN THE EAST. 44. NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS, ETC.

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About six miles from the Mississippi river, in an eastwardly direc. tion from St. Louis, in St. Clair county, Illinois, is situated a remarkable group of mounds, which rise out of the level prairie of the American Bottom, at a distance of two or three miles from the bluffs, or high-lands, and range semi-circularly with the margin of the prairie. The greater one, or Monks' Mound, is in the form of a parallelogram, and is estimated to be one hundred and twenty-five feet high. Its top is flat, and presents an area of about two acres, laid out in a garden, planted with fruit and shade-trees, and containing the residence of the proprietor. On the south side of this mound is a terrace, about two hundred and fifty yards long, and ninety in width, perfectly level, and elevated about forty-five feet above the surface of the prairie. At the distance of a quarter of a mile to the north-east, Cantine creek enters Cahokia creek, and the latter winds around within one hundred and fifty yards of the northern base of the mound. To the west, some two hundred yards, on a small mound, was formerly the principal residence of a community of Monks of the Order of La Trappe, from whom the place took the name of · Monks' Mound.' Southwardly there are two mounds, about sixty feet apart at the base, and sixty feet high. One of them rises very steeply in a coni. cal form, and has a large tree growing near the top of it. At a distance it looks not unlike a large helmet-cap of a dragoon, with a feather in the side. On the west of these mounds, and immediately at the base, is a large pond ; and it requires but a very little stretch of the imagination to suppose that all the earth used in elevating the mounds was taken from the bed of the pond. The mounds altogether on the American Bottom have been estimated at two hundred in number. They are of various forms and sizes, and some of them are crowned with trees, that must have been growing for centuries. They are all com. posed of the same kind of earth, without any stones in them, except

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VOL. XXV.

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