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A BOOK OF FAMOUS VERSE

HUNTING SONG

WAKEN, lords and ladies gay,
On the mountain dawns the day ;
All the jolly chase is here
With hawk and horse and hunting-spear ;
Hounds are in their couples yelling,
Hawks are whistling, horns are knelling,
Merrily, merrily mingle they,
Waken, lords and ladies gay."

66

Waken, lords and ladies gay,
The mist has left the mountain gray,
Springlets in the dawn are steaming,
Diamonds on the brake are gleaming,
And foresters have busy been
To track the buck in thicket green ;
Now we come to chant our lay,
• Waken, lords and ladies gay.”

Waken, lords and ladies gay,
To the greenwood haste away ;
We can show you where he lies,
Fleet of foot and tall of size ;

We can show the marks he made
When 'gainst the oak his antlers fray'd;
You shall see him brought to bay ;
Waken, lords and ladies gay.

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Louder, louder chant the lay,
Waken, lords and ladies gay!
Tell them youth and mirth and glet
Run a course as well as we;
Time, stern huntsman! who can balk,
Stanch as hound and fleet as hawk;
Think of this and rise with day,
Gentle lords and ladies gay!

Sir Walter Scott.

THE SOLITARY REAPER

BEHOLD her, single in the field,
Yon solitary Highland Lass !
Reaping and singing by herself;
Stop here, or gently pass !
Alone she cuts and binds the grain,
And sings a melancholy strain ;
Oh listen ! for the vale profound
Is overflowing with the sound.

No nightingale did ever chaunt
More welcome notes to weary

bands
Of travelers, in some shady haunt
Among Arabian sands :
No sweeter voice was ever heard
In spring-time from the cuckoo bird,

Breaking the silence of the seas
Among the farthest Hebrides.

Will no one tell me what she sings?
Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
For old, unhappy, far-off things,
And battles long ago :
Or is it some more humble lay,
Familiar matter of to-day ?
Some natural sorrow, loss, or pain,
That has been, and may be again?

Whate'er the theme, the maiden sang
As if her song could have no ending ;
I saw her singing at her work,
And o'er the sickle bending;
I listen’d till I had

my
And as I mounted up the hill
The music in my heart I bore
Long after it was heard no more.

William Wordsworth.

fill;

EPITAPH ON A HARE 1

HERE lies, whom hound did ne'er pursue,

Nor swifter greyhound follow, Whose foot ne'er tainted morning dew,

Nor ear heard huntsman's halloo,

Old Tiney, surliest of his kind,
Who, nursed with tender carr

1 Note 1.

And to domestic bounds confined,

Was still a wild Jack hare.

Though duly from my hand he took

His pittance every night, He did it with a jealous look,

And, when he could, would bite.

His diet was of wheaten bread,

And milk, and oats, and straw ; Thistles, or lettuces instead,

With sand to scour his maw.

On twigs of hawthorn he regaled,

On pippins' russet peel,
And, when his juicy salads failed,

Sliced carrot pleased him well.

A Turkey carpet was his lawn,

Whereon he loved to bound, To skip and gambol like a fawn,

And swing his rump around.

His frisking was at evening hours,

For then he lost his fear,
But most before approaching showers,

Or when a storm drew near.

Eight years and five round rolling moons

He thus saw steal away, Dozing out all his idle noons,

And every night at play.

I kept him for his humor's sake,

For he would oft beguile
My heart of thoughts that made it ache,

And force me to a smile.

But now beneath his walnut shade

He finds his long last home,
And waits, in snug concealment laid,

Till gentler Puss shall come.

He, still more aged, feels the shocks

From which no care can save, And, partner once of Tiney's box, Must soon partake his grave.

William Cowper.

INFANT JOY

“I HAVE no name;
I am but two days old.”
“ What shall I call thee?

“ I happy am;
Joy is my name.
Sweet joy befall thee !

Pretty joy!
Sweet joy, but two days old.
Sweet joy I call thee :

Thou dost smile:

I sing the while,
Sweet joy befall thee !

William Blake.

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