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kind, and part freshly ploughd. No houses or inhabitants were seen, but we could plainly distinguish their fires upon the hills. About 10 o'clock we passed the tomb of a marabout or saint; a small white structure erected on the side of a solitary mountain near

the sea.

“About three o'clock we passed the town of Cherchelli. It is about three quarters of a mile in length, situated in a plain on the sea shore, which is entirely inclosed by high hills. The town is defended by an old castle at one end, and by another apparently more modern at the other. In the middle of it is a mosque on which as we passed we observed the white flag hung out as a signal for prayers. The houses are built close to each other with flat roofs, and being all whitewashed over, had a striking appearance when viewed from the sea. To the eastward of the town is a burial ground in which were erected two small domes, which, as captain Cathcart informed us, were mausoleums of people of quality. They were not inelegantly constructed, and were, like the houses, perfectly white. Around the town the country is divided into a number of gardens, in which the trees were seen in full bloom, and through which a serpentine road, gradually ascended from the town until it was lost from the view among the mountains.

“ After passing Cherchelli the country resumed its former appearance. High rocks covered with moss or with dwarfish shrubs, interspersed with a small piece of ploughed land wherever the declivity was less abrupt, were again the only objects of our view. In passing a valley that opened towards the sea we obtained a transient sight of the remains of an ancient aqueduct, but it was so soon shut in from our view that we had scarce time to observe it.

“February 9th. This morning the shore began to present us with a different prospect. Instead of the wild and desolate rocks that lined all the coast that we had seen, (excepting about Chercelli,) we now beheld the sides of the high hills that bordered on the sea covered with numberless country seats and gardens in the Moorish manner. The gradual rise of the ground, from the rocks over which the waves of the Mediterranean constantly dashed to the summit whose height diminished the trees upon it to brushwood, gave a full display of every plantation as they rose one above another. In a valley to the eastward was a castle which had been converted into a Moorish palace and whose white towers rendered it conspicuous at a great distance; beyond this we discovered the fortifications of point Piscao, which, stretching out into the waters, bounded the prospect to the eastward. Two forts, one a little inland at the foot of the hill, and the other on the extremity of the rock impendent over the water, crowned the promontory. To the westward we could still discover the barren rocks and sand hills that we had left, on one of which was to be seen a conical mount that

appeared to have been raised as a land mark. The land immediately opposite to us was covered with almond trees in full blossom, the odour of which,

disposition is to be found; but, my good sir, be pleased to read the history of quisquis and quamquam, and a thousand other delectable incidents that have set whole nations together by the ears."

“ Towards noon of the 7th. we passed Cape Blanco, where Scipio is said to have landed in his expedition against Carthage. The cape itself is rocky, barren, and uneven, but there are, on both sides of it, places proper for the debarkation of an army. The western landing place is a sandy beach, about three miles from the cape, leading up into a valley, between two high and steep rocky hills. The country on this side is very barren and displays no marks of settlement, excepting an old watchtower upon a very high hill on the cape and a few distant inland olive yards. On the eastern side of the cape, where it is probable that Scipio landed, there is an extent of fertile cultivated ground, rising gently from the water and stretching into the bay of Bizerte, at the bottom of which lies the city of the same name. The land around it appears to be extremely fertile, and, as far as can be seen, is covered with plantations of olive trees. The town is seated upon a low ground and surrounded by a wall: from which a covered way lcads up to the castle on the top of a hill of gentle ascent. About half a mile to the westward there is a small fort on the shore. To the westward a high ridge of land runs back into the country from Cape Blanco, the sides of which are covered with olive trees. The eastern side of the bay shows nothing but rocks and sand.

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sorts, which we perceived at anchor in the harbour. We were soon moored between them, and found that the brig had arrived the day before and the schooner about a week since."

From Algiers they soon after sailed for 'Tunis, in order to negotiate a treaty with the Bey.

On the 6th of March, he writes “ we discovered a vessel, which, from her maneuvres, every body supposed to be a Frenchman. The passion of avarice, which is seldom dormant in the breast of man, inspired the crew with the hope of prize-money and rendered the men eager to give chase. This was accordingly done, and on coming within gun shot of her, first one gun and then another was fired to bring her to, which last summons she obeyed; but by this time it had grown quite calm so that we could not get up with her, and, night soon coming on, she escaped."

“ Whether war be the natural state of mankind, is a question which has arisen rather from political speculation than from actual observation. But whoever has paid the least attention to men in this unna. tural state of civilization, as it is called, must have perceived that they are generally so fond of little quarrellings and bickerings, that when they have no real object of contention they will create one. The next morning after this incident, I overheard our sailors disputing how the prize money ought to have been divided in case we had taken the Frenchman. Here, perhaps, some one may observe, that it is only among the vulgar and ignorant that this turbulent

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disposition is to be found; but, my good sir, be pleased to read the history of quisquis and quamquam, and a thousand other delectable incidents that have set whole nations together by the ears."

- Towards noon of the 7th, we passed Cape Blanco, where Scipio is said to have landed in his expedition against Carthage. The cape itself is rocky, barren, and uneven, but there are, on both sides of it, places proper for the debarkation of an army. The western landing place is a sandy beach, about three miles from the cape, leading up into a valley, between two high and steep rocky hills. The country on this side is very barren and displays no marks of settlement, excepting an old watchtower upon a very high hill on the cape and a few distant inland olive yards. On the eastern side of the cape, where it is probable that Scipio landed, there is an extent of fertile cultivated ground, rising gently from the water and stretching into the bay of Bizerte, at the bottom of which lies the city of the same name. The land around it appears to be extremely fertile, and, as far as can be seen, is covered with plantations of olive trees. The town is seated upon a low ground and surrounded by a wall: from which a covered way leads up to the castle on the top of a hill of gentle ascent. About half a mile to the westward there is a small fort on the shore. To the westward a high ridge of land runs back into the country from Cape Blanco, the sides of which are covered with olive trees. The eastern side of the bay shows nothing but rocks and sand.

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