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SOCIETY OF TAMMANY: OR, COLUMBIAN ORDER, CELEBRATION, SATURDAY, JULY 4th, 1863.

CORDER OF ARRANGEMENTS: The Sachems and Brothers will assemble in the Grand Wigwam at 11%, A. M., for the transaction of business. At 12 o'clock the Grand Council Chamber will be thrown open for the admission of members, invited guests and

friends of the Society.

THE EXERCISES WILL COMMENCE AT ONE O'CLOCK PRECISELY, WITH MUSIC,...

NATIONAL GUARD BAND. OPENING ADDRESS,

.BY GRAND SACHEN PURDY. SONG AND CHORUS,. . THE FLAG OF OUR Union. Father Reed's Quartette.

Accompanied on the piano by Prof. O. F. Olney. THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

Will then be read by Brother Thomas C. FIELDS. CHORUS.. ..Red, White and Blue,...... QUARTETTE. DRAKE'S ADDRESS TO THE AMERICAN FLAG,

Will be recited by Hosea B. PERKINS, Esq. Song and Chorus, ......BONNIE OLD FLAG, ......... Quartette.

A Patriotic Poem, written expressly for the occasion and entitled
DEMOCRACY AND THE NATION,

Will be read by the Author, HENRY MORFORD, Esq.

BALL AD,..
ORATION,..
BALLAD, ....

.. By the QUARTETTE. By Hon. Henry C. Murphy.

.....Mr. GUSTAVUS GEARY.

The Exercises in the large room will conclude with the “STAR SPANGLED BANNER,” to be sung by Father Reed's Quartette, accompanied by Prof. Olney and the National Guard Band, the audience rising and joining in the chorus. After which the members of the Society, with their friends and invited guests, will adjourn to the Banquet Room, where appropriate toasts will be responded to hy distinguished Democrats of this city and state.

The Grand Council Chamber will be elaborately decorated with flags and emblems of all nations. The front seats will be reserved exclusively for ladies. Tickets of admission (which are gratis) can be obtained of either of the following

COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS: Sachem JOHN KELLY,

Sachem JOHN E. DEVELIN, Sachem DANIEL E. DELAVAN, Sachem ISAAC BELL,

Sachem CHAS. G. CORNELL, Sachem MATT. T. BRENNAN, Sachem PETER B. SWEENY, Sagamore G. S. MESSERVE, Sachem ANDRE FROMENT, Sachem RICH'D B. CONNOLLY, Wiskinkie S. C. DURYEA, Sachem EDWARD COOPER,

Sachem DOUGLAS TAYLOR, Treasurer H. VANDEWATER, CASPER C. CHILDS,

ELIJAH F. PURDY, Secretary

GRAND SACHEX. RICHARD WINNE, Scribe.

JAMES B. NICHOLSON, Father of the Council.

Committee from the Democratic General Committee of New York :
WILLIAM M. TWEED,
EDWARD MARRINER,

TIMOTHY SULLIVAN,
JOHN Y. SAVAGE,
THOS. B. TAPPAN,

JOHN HURLEY,
GEO. L. LOUTREL,
AARON B, ROLLINS,

JOSEPH M. MAŘSH,
ALEXANDER BRANDON,
JOHN CLANCY,

JAMES O'NEIL,
GEO. A. JEREMIAH,
JOHN MOORE,

WILLIAM JOYCE,
JOHN FITCH,
THOMAS BRADY,

ISIAH RYNDERS,
JOHN MCGRÁNE,
PATRICK MCMAHON,

JOHN B. RYER.

A sufficient indication of the success which rewarded the efforts of the Committee, and also of the patriotic feeling existing in the crowded audience, may be gathered from the subjoined account of the celebration, extracted from the able report of the New York Sunday Dispatch :

The day at Tammany was all that the most enthusiastic and intensely patriotic Sachems of the Old Wigwam could have desired. The controlling genius of the occasion was the “Spirit of '76," who not only superintended the exercises of the anniversary, but seemed to infuse into the minds of all present the loftiest thoughts which found utterance in eloquent words, in harmonious applause, and in gesticulation prolific with significance. It did not require any great exercise of the imagination to feel that the stalwart and impressive figure of Old Hickory was standing in the midst of the scene, casting its influence upon all, and pointing its immovable finger towards Gettysburg, declaring that the “Union must and shall be preserved." Even amid the festivities of the day all appeared to feel the impressiveness of the scene, and the loyal beating of every heart spoke in almost audible language of earnest devotion to the old flag, the stars of which shed a glorious lustre over the place.

Decorated with banners and other appropriate emblems, the old Wigwam afforded the widest scope for patriotic meditation. It filled every heart with pride, and implanted the conviction in every mind that

“ Each day our Union's constellated banner

Gives joy to every patriotic heart,
Despite men's curses and the base endeavor

Of guilty hands to rend its folds apart

The display of flags was unusually imposing. The colors, numbering several hundred, were hung about the room, entirely covering the walls, and were suspended in graceful festoons above the audience.

The portraits of the Father of his Country, and of Harry of the West and General Lafayette, looked down upon the congregation, and the time-honored banners of the Society, together with the insignia of the thirteen original States, were conspicuously displayed in the 66 Great Council Chamber."

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For an hour before the exercises began, the disciples of St. Tammany began to assemble in the old Wigwam. The great topic of the day, the news from Gettysburg—formed the principal theme of conversation, and elicited the most patriotic remarks from all who participated in the general discussion. Of course, there was considerable criticism indulged in, and some heavy batteries were opened upon some of the incumbents of high Governmental positions, but the one idea which was more prominent than all others was that the rebels should not only be driven in dismay from the old Keystone State, but that they should also be made to suffer a defeat which would result in the restoration of the Union and an acknowledgment of the supremacy of the old Flag. It was an inspiriting scene fraught with suggestions of the most forcible nature.

Shortly after twelve Messrs. Douglas Taylor, Daniel E. Delavan and Matthew T. Brennan, the Special Committee of Arrangements, met and perfected the arrangements for making the Anniversary a feature of the most glorious description. The National Guard band in the mean time aided in keeping up the enthusiasm of the audience by playing a variety of national and popular airs, filling the old wigwam with excellent music. Among those who occupied seats upon the platform were, Hon. Edwards Pierrepont, Daniel E. Delavan, Esq., Judge C. P. Daly, Hon. James Brooks, Hon. John Stryker, of Oneida, Judge John M. Barbour, Judge Henry Hilton, Hon. Richard B. Connolly, Hon. Isaac Bell, Hon. John J. Bradley, Samuel B. Garvin, Esq., Hon. A. Oakey Hall, Hon. William McMurray, Judge Josiah Sutherland, Judge Edmund L. Hearne, Peter B. Sweeny, Esq., Douglas Taylor, Esq., Hon. John Clancy, Nathaniel Jarvis, Jr., Esq., John Murphy, Esq., George W. McLean, Esq., Hon. William Miner, Hon. Anson Herrick, Edward Marriner, Esq., Ald. Terence Farley, Ald. C. J. Chipp, Hon. William M. Tweed, Henry Vandewater, Esq., Hon. Thomas C. Fields, Casper C. Childs, Esq., Hon. James B. Nicholson, Thomas Dunlap, Esq., and Justice Dodge.

At one o'clock the Sachems and principal guests marched in the room, the officers being decorated with badges, and the guests designated by a rosette of red, white and blue ribbon, and at half-past one the exercises began by the meeting being called to order by the old War Horse of Tammany, Hon. E. F. Purdy, who addressed the society as follows:

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ADDRESS OF GRAND SACHEM PURDY.

SACHEMS, BROTHERS AND FRIENDS :—We have assembled in this our great Wigwam, to celebrate another anniversary of a nation's birth-day. Our custom to do so is coëval with the existence of our Government. In the name of Tammany Society or Columbian Order I greet you with a cordial welcome. Yes, welcome, thrice welcome to our council chamber. This day eighty-seven years ago our forefathers proclaimed that Americans were of right a free and independent people. Auspicious the day, eventful the hour and most glorious the cause. An astonished world beheld a nation of freemen thinking, speaking and acting as such. The Union, the Constitution and the laws formed by the patriots of '76 will be preserved, sustained and defended by their descendants of '63. [Great applause.] Where and by whom can the anniversary of American Independence be more appropriately celebrated than in this Old Wigwam, and by Tammany Society, or Columbian Order—a society formed at an early period of our country's history, its founders deeply imbued with a love for civil and religious liberty and the right of man to self-government? I feel that I but express the sentiments of my brothers of the Order of St. Tammany and of the people of the great and patriotic city of New York, when I say that while we live we will meet here and keep alive the patriotic flame of liberty, equality and fraternity, and smoke the calumet of peace and good will with all supporters and defenders of the Union and the Constitution of our country. [Cheers.] As the patriot Jackson said so we say-_- The Union: it must and shall be preserved!” [Applause.] Let us again renew our fealty to the Union, and pledge ourselves, one to the other, to cease not in our exertions and rest not from our labors until the Union as it was and the Constitution with all its inherent rights are maintained and defended, with one Union, one Constitution and government on the American continent. [Immense cheering.]

After appropriate music by the Band, THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE was read with decided effect by BROTHER THOMAS C. FIELDS. The reading was listened to with the greatest attention, and elicited hearty and repeated cheers.

The next feature of the occasion was the reciting of Drake's Address to the American Flag, by HOSEA B. PERKINS, Esq. Mr. PERKINS prefaced his recitation with a few remarks, which were warmly received by the audience, and his delivery of this splendid poem was loudly applauded throughout. DRAKE'S ADDRESS TO THE AMERICAN FLAG.

When Freedom from her mountain height

Unfurled her standard to the air,
She tore the azure robe of night,

And set the stars of glory there!
She mingled with its gorgeous dyes
The milky baldric of the skies,
And striped its pure celestial white
With streakings of the morning light!
Then, from his mansion in the sun,
She called her eagle bearer down,
And gave into his mighty hand
The symbol of her chosen land!

Majestic monarch of the cloud !
Who rear'st aloft thy regal form,
To hear the tempest trumping loud,
And see the lightning-lances driven,
When stride the warriors of the storm,
And rolls the thunder-drum of heaven,
Child of the sun! to thee 't is given
To guard the banner of the free,
To hover in the sulphur smoke,
To ward away the battle-stroke,
And bid its blendings shine afar,
Like rainbows on the cloud of war,
The harbinger of victory!

Flag of the brave! Thy folds shall fly,
The sign of hope and triumph high!
When speaks the signal trumpet-tone,

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