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the ocean, and the mighty chain of her wealth shall be broken, with which she has so long bound the European world to her chariot-wheels, and mustered the nations, from the banks of the Tagus to the banks of the Don, to march beneath the banner of her coalitions, that then there will be no unworthy descendant to catch her mantle ; and that the rich treasure of her institutions and character, instead of becoming the unrescued prey of Huns and Vandals, and whatever uncouth name of barbarism laid waste of old the refinements of the world, will be preserved, upheld, and perfected in the western world of promise.

SECTION XXVIII.

WALLENSTEIN-COUNT TERTSKY....S. T. Coleridge.

Wallenstein. If there were yet a choice! if yet some

milder
Way of escape were possible—I still
Will choose it, and avoid the last extreme.

Count. Desir'st thou nothing further ? Such a way
Lies still before thee. Send this Wrangel off,
Forget thou thy old hopes, cast far away
All thy past life; determine to commence
A new one. Virtue hath her heroes too,
As well as Fame and Fortune. To Vienna-
Hence-to the Emperor-kneel before the throne;
Take a full coffer with thee-say aloud,
Thou did'st but wish to prove thy fealty ;
Thy whole intention but to dupe the Swede.

Wal. For that too 'tis too late. They know too much I should but bear my own head to the block.

Count. Art thou in earnest? I entreat thee! Canst thou
Consent to bear thyself to thy own grave,
So ignominiously to be dried up?
Thy

life, that arrogated such an height,
To end in such a nothing! To be nothing,
When one was always nothing, is an evil
That asks no stretch of patience, a light evil:
But to become a nothing, having been-

Wal. Show me a way out of this stifling crowd,
Ye Powers of Aidance! Show me such a way

As I am capable of going. I
Am no tongue-hero, no fine virtue-prattler;
I cannot warm by thinking; cannot say
To the good luck that turns her back upon me,
Magnanimously : “Go; I need thee not.”
Cease I to work, I am annihilated.
Dangers nor sacrifices will I shun,
If so I may avoid the last extreme;
But ere I sink down into nothingness,
Leave off so little, who began so great,
Ere that the world confuses me with those
Poor wretches, whom a day creates and crumbles,
This age and after ages speak my name
With hate and dread; and Friedland be redemption
For each accursed deed!
Count.

What is there here, then,
So against nature? Help me to perceive it!
O let not superstition's nightly goblins
Subdue thy clear bright spirit! Art thou bid
To murder ?—with abhorr'd accursed poniard,
To violate the breasts that nourished thee?
That were against our nature, that might aptly
Make thy flesh shudder, and thy whole heart sicken,
Yet not a few, and for a meaner object
Have ventured even this ; ay, and performed it.
What is there in thy case so black and monstrous ?
Thou art accused of treason-whether with
Or without justice is not now the question-
Thou art lost if thou dost not avail thee quickly
Of the power which thou possessest-Friedland! Duke!
Tell me, where lives that thing so meek and tame,
That doth not all his living faculties
Put forth in preservation of his life?
What deed so daring, which necessity
And desperation will not sanctify ?

Wal. Once was this Ferdinand so gracious to me: He loved me; he esteemed me; I was placed The nearest to his heart. Full inany a time We, like familiar friends, both at one table Have banqueted together. And is't come to this ?

Count. So faithfully preserv'st thou each small favour, And hast no memory for contumelies ? Must I remind thee, how at Regenspurg This man repaid thy faithful services ? All ranks and all conditions in the empire

H

the ocean, and the mighty chain of her wealth shall be broken, with which she has so long bound the European world to her chariot-wheels, and mustered the nations, from the banks of the Tagus to the banks of the Don, to march beneath the banner of her coalitions, that then there will be no unworthy descendant to catch her mantle ; and that the rich treasure of her institutions and character, instead of becoming the unrescued prey of Huns and Vandals, and whatever uncouth name of barbarism laid waste of old the refinements of the world, will be preserved, upheld, and perfected in the western world of promise.

SECTION XXVIII.

WALLENSTEIN-COUNT TERTSKY..... S. T. Coleridge. Wallenstein. If there were yet a choice! if yet some

milder
Way of escape were possible—I still
Will choose it, and avoid the last extreme.

Count. Desir’st thou nothing further ? Such a way
Lies still before thee. Send this Wrangel off,
Forget thou thy old hopes, cast far away
All thy past life; determine to commence
A new one. Virtue hath her heroes too,
As well as Fame and Fortune. To Vienna-
Hence—to the Emperor-kneel before the throne;
Take a full coffer with thee-say aloud,
Thou did'st but wish to prove thy fealty ;
Thy whole intention but to dupe the Swede.

Wal. For that too 'tis too late. They know too much I should but bear my own head to the block.

Count. Art thou in earnest ? I entreat thee! Canst thou Consent to bear thyself to thy own grave, So ignominiously to be dried up? Thy life, that arrogated such an height, To end in such a nothing! To be nothing, When one was always nothing, is an evil That asks no stretch of patience, a light evil : But to become a nothing, having been

Wal. Show me a way out of this stifling crowd, Ye Powers of Aidance! Show me such a way

As I am capable of going. I
Am no tongue-hero, no fine virtue-prattler;
I cannot warm by thinking ; cannot say
To the good luck that turns her back upon me,
Magnanimously : “Go; I need thee not."
Cease I to work, I am annihilated.
Dangers nor sacrifices will I shun,
If so I may avoid the last extreme;
But ere I sink down into nothingness,
Leave off so little, who began so great,
Ere that the world confuses me with those
Poor wretches, whom a day creates and crumbles,
This age and after ages speak my name
With hate and dread; and Friedland be redemption
For each accursed deed!
Count.

What is there here, then,
So against nature? Help me to perceive it!
0 let not superstition's nightly goblins
Subdue thy clear bright spirit! Art thou bid
To murder ?—with abhorr'd accursed poniard,
To violate the breasts that nourished thee?
That were against our nature, that might aptly
Make thy flesh shudder, and thy whole heart sicken,
Yet not a few, and for a meaner object
Have ventured even this ; ay, and performed it.
What is there in thy case so black and monstrous ?
Thou art accused of treason—whether with
Or without justice is not now the question-
Thou art lost if thou dost not avail thee quickly
Of the power which thou possessest-Friedland! Duke !
Tell me, where lives that thing so meek and tame,
That doth not all his living faculties
Put forth in preservation of his life!
What deed so daring, which necessity
And desperation will not sanctify ?

Wal. Once was this Ferdinand so gracious to me: He loved me; he esteemed me; I was placed The nearest to his heart. Full inany a time We, like familiar friends, both at one table Have banqueted together. And is't come to this ?

Count. So faithfully preserv'st thou each small favour, And hast no memory for contumelies ? Must I remind thee, how at Regenspurg This man repaid thy faithful services ? All ranks and all conditions in the empire

H

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Ant. O, thou hast fir'd me! my soul's up in arms,
And mans each part about me.

Once again
The nobleness of fight has seized me.
Come on, my soldier ;
Our hearts and arms are still the same.
Once more to meet our foes ; that thou and I,
Like Time and Death, marching before our troops,
May taste fate to 'em; mow 'em out a passage,
And, ent'ring where the utmost squadrons yield,
Begin the noble harvest of the field.

I long

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SECTION XXIV.

EXTRACT FROM MR. WEBSTER'S SPEECH IN REPLY TO

MR. HAYNE.

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rence.

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The eulogium pronounced on the character of the state of South Carolina, by the honourable gentleman, for her revolutionary and other merits, meets my hearty concur

I shall not acknowledge, that the honourable member goes before me in regard for whatever of distinguished talent or distinguished character, South Carolina has produced. I claim part of the honor, I partake in the pride of her great names.

I claim them for countrymen, one and all. The Laurens, the Rutledges, the Pinckneys, the Sumpters, the Marions-Americans, all-whose fame is no more to be hemmed in by state lines, than their talents and patriotism were capable of being ciroumscribed within the same narrow limits. In their day and generation, they served and honoured the country, and the whole country; and their renown is of the treasures of the whole country, Him, whose honoured name the gentleman himself bears does he suppose me less capable of gratitude for his patriotism, or sympathy for his sufferings, than if his eyes had first opened upon the light in Massachusetts, instead of South Carolina ? Sir, does he suppose it is in his power to exhibit a Carolina name so bright as to produce envy in my bosom? No, sir; increased gratification and delight, rather.

Sir, I thank God, that if I am gifted with little of the spirit which is said to be able to raise mortals to the skies, I have yet none, as I trust, of that other spirit, which would drag angels down. When I shall be found, sir, in my place

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