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Beauty, 46; treatment of Guine.
vere contrasted with that of Morris
and S. Phillips, 59; creed, 62;
message to his age, 63, 64; rela-
tions to science and religious
doubt, 65-67; influence of Hal-
lam, 68; religious thought in In
Memoriam, 72-85; Protestantism,
86, 87; belief in immortality, 89,
90; view of life compared with Fitz-
Gerald's and Browning's, 94, 95;
patriotism, 95, 97; imperialism,
98, 101, 229; praise of commerce,
98, 99;

and war, 100; early
liberalism, 102, 103; later con-
servatism, 105, 106; worship of
law, 107, 108, 133; denunciation
of license in literature, 108, 109;
use of astronomy, III-113; know-
ledge and use of science, 114-118;
exact observation, 116, 118, 123,
204 ; constructive imagination,
116, 117, 204; attitude to Nature
compared with Wordsworth's, 118,
119; imaginative landscapes, 118-
120; delight in water, 120, 121,
and imagery thence derived, 122;
intimate knowledge of Nature,
123-126, especially flowers, 126,
127; pictures of English life and
scenery, 127, 128; purpose in
landscape, 129; essentially lyric,
131 ; poems classical in subject or
form, 132–139; poems on English
domestic life, 139, 140, 185; pic-
torial poems, 141; complimentary
vérses, 141, 142; dialect poems,
142–145; humour, 145; ballads,
145, 146, and lyrics, 146–148;
studied irregularity of metre, 148;
width of range, 150; sources of
the Idylls, 152-157; allegorical
aim, 154-156, its predominance in
later Idylls, 155; ideal of love,
157; changes in the stories of

Idylls, 157, 160; use of Malory's
story of Elaine, 182, 183; inven-
tion of incident, 184; plays, 184-
198; dramatist of England, 189-
197; insularity, 195; love of pro-
priety, 196; methods of construc-
tion, 200; mastery of narrative,
200, 201, of language, 201, 202,
204, and metre 202; lucidity, 203;
power of magical suggestion, 203,
204; originality, 205; skill in sug-
gesting sound, 206, 207; allitera-
tion and onomatopoeia, 207–209;
rhythms, 210; obligations to
Moore, 210; blank verse, 211,
218-220; source of In Memoriam
stanza, 211-218; metrical innova-
tion in Maud, 216, 217, and other
poems, 218; poetical analogues :
Spenser, 221-223, Pope, 223, 224,
and others, 224-226; place in
literature, 226–229; especial like-
ness to Virgil, 227-229; influence

as poet and man, 229.
Tennyson, the family, 3, 5, 7, 9, 14.
Thackeray, 13, 36, 37, 102, 132.
Theocritus, 133, 137.
Timbuctoo, 5.
Tiresias, 14.
Tithonus, 133-135.
Tribute, The, 24, 50.
Two Voices, The, 8, 68-70, III, 112,

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