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19566

Statement of

Pago

Ames, Charles T., manager, electric department, city of Holly Springs,

Miss

1100

Cole, John P., statistician, Association of Southeastern Railroads;
accompanied by Robert L. Cornelius.--

1072

Davis, Hon. Clifford, a Representative in Congress from the State of

Tennessee

1028

Hardin, Brig. Gen. John R., United States Ariny, division engineer,

Lower Mississippi Valley division, Corps of Engineers, and presi-

dent, Mississippi River Commission---

1033, 1107

Henking, Dana M., Memphis, Tenn., president, Propeller Club of the

United States..

1058

Jones, Floyd, manager, Gibson County Electric Membership Corp.,

Trenton, Tenn., and president, Tennessee Rural Electric Cooperative

Association --

1132

Kittrell, Clark, port director, Memphis and Shelby County Port Com-

mission---

1030

McCourt, W. E., Jr., Greenville, Miss., secretary-treasurer, Greenville
Gravel Co. and Greenville Dredging Co------

1105
Mitten, Robert, attorney, Illinois Central Railroad Co., Chicago, Ill.. 1095
Roby, E. R., representing the Southern Rail Carriers---

1124
Rook, w. T., assistant commissioner, Memphis Freight Bureau--- 1054
Smith, Stanton E., president, Tennessee Federation of Labor, Chatta-
nooga, Tenn.

1115

Taylor, Tyre, general counsel, Southern States Industrial Council --- 1061

Winter, Everett T., St. Louis, Mo., executive vice president, Mississippi

Valley Association --

1051

Wooten, Jesse D., executive vice president, Mid-South Chemical Corp.,

Memphis, Tenn.-

1055

Wright, Ervin H., manager Southwest Tennessee Electric Member-

ship Corp., and member, Tennessee Valley Public Power Associa-

tion.-

1137

Letters, statements, etc., submitted for the record by-

Cole, John P., statistician, Association of Southeastern Railroads:

Computation of annual cost of Federal aid to navigation on se

lected inland waterways, year 1954.----

1081

Excerpt from computation of annual cost of Federal aid to navi-
gation on selected waterways.-

1074
Excerpt from progress report of the Domestic Land and Water
Transportation Subcommittee, 81st Congress---

1073
Henking, Dana M., Memphis, Tenn., president, Propeller Club of the

United States; Resolution adopted at the 29th annual convention
of the Propeller Club held at New Orleans, La., October 9-12,
1955_

1059

Jones, Floyd, manager, Gibson County Electric Membership Corp.,

Trenton, Tenn., and president, Tennessee Rural Electric Coopera-

tive Association: Excerpt from Commission Report on Water Re-

sources and Power.

1132

Jones, Hon. Robert E., a Representative in Congress from the State of

Alabama, and chairman, Special Subcommittee on Water Resources

and Power:

Excerpt from Commission Report on Water Resources and

Power-

1124

Letters of invitation and list of people invited to the hearing, at

Memphis, Tenn., November 3 and 4, 1955.-

1139

M

Letters, statements, etc.—Continued
Jones, Hon. Robert E.-Continued

Page
Telegram from W. T. McKinney, chairman, Delta Council Flood

Control Committee, Stoneville, Miss., to Hon. Robert E. Jones.- 1061 Lipscomb, Hon. Glenard P., a Representative in Congress from the

State of California : Excerpt from Comptroller General's report on
Tennessee Valley Authority for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1954

1137
Mitten, Robert, attorney, Illinois Central Railroad Co., Chicago, Ill. :
Affidavits from
Brown, Harris, State of Tennessee, October 28, 1955_

1104 Conger, R. D., State of Tennessee, November 1, 1955_

1104 Gaffney, Joseph B., Jr., State of Tennessee, November 1955.- 1103 Jones, James N., State of Tennessee, October 29, 1955_

1105 McCutcheon, D. A., State of Tennessee, October 31, 1955--- 1103 Parker, J. D., State of Tennessee, November 1, 1955_

1104 Threadgill, J. G., State of Tennessee, October 28, 1955_

1103 Excerpt from budget message of President Dwight D. Eisenhower to the Congress, January 17, 1955--

1097 Escerpt from budget message of President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the Congress, January 20, 1940---

1097 Excerpt from budget message of President Harry S. Truman to the Congress, 1951.

1097 Excerpt from Commission Report on Water Resources and Power 1095 Excerpt from (H. Doc. 159, 79th Cong.) Public aids to domestic transportation

1096 Excerpt from report of Section of Research, l'ederal Coordinator of Transportation on public aids to transportation.--.

1096 Roby, E. R., representing the Southern Rail Carriers :

Excerpt from Coordinator Eastman's report of public aids to
transportation

1128 Excerpt from President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Board of Investi

gation and Research, Senate Document No. 159, 79th Congress... 1128 Excerpt from report entitled, “Public Aids to Transportation". 1126 Excerpt from statement of Senator Myers of Pennsylvania in 1949_

1128 Statement showing the ton-miles of various transportation agencies

together with the percentage proportion for each type of trans-
portation for years 1942 through 1954, and 4-year grouping
before and after World War II.---

1131 Taylor, Tyre, general counsel, Southern States Industrial Council:

Excerpt from Commission Report on Water Resources and
Power--

1061, 1063, 1064, 1065
Excerpt from report prepared by the Presidential Advisory Com-
mittee on Transport Policy and Organization----

1064 Ex'erpt from Task Force Report on Water Resources and Power.. 1063 Policy statement of Southern States Industrial Council -

1061 Winter, Everett T., St. Louis, Mo., executive vice president, Mississippi Valley Association : Excerpt from resolution adopted by the Mississippi Valley Association

1054
Excerpt from statement of President Herbert Hoover in 1927.- 1053
Resolution adopted by the Mississippi Valley Association at St.
Louis, Mo., February 1955.--

1051

COMMISSION ON ORGANIZATION OF THE EXECUTIVE

BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT

(Water Resources and Power Report)

Part 6—Memphis, Tenn.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1955

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
SPECIAL SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER RESOURCES AND POWER
OF THE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS,

Memphis, Tenn. The special subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, in the Federal courtroom, Post Office Building, Memphis, Tenn., at 10 a. m., Hon. Robert E. Jones, Jr. (chairman of the special subcommittee) presiding.

Members present: Representatives Robert E. Jones, Jr., Martha W. Griffiths, Henry S. Reuss, and Glenard P. Lipscomb. Also present:

Representative Clifford Davis, William C. Wise, staff director; William L. Sturdevant, professional staff member; and Robert Morris.

Mr. Jones. This is a special subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations selected to study the recommendations of the Hoover Commission Report on Water Resources and Power. Mrs. Martha W. Griffiths on my right is a member of the subcommittee from the State of Michigan; Mr. Henry Reuss, a member of the subcommittee of the State of Wisconsin; Glen Lipscomb on my left is a member of the subcommittee from the State of California. My name is Bob Jones and I am a member from the State of Alabama. Our host for this meeting, who has received us so cordially, is your own Congressman Cliff Davis. Cliff Davis probably more than any man in the Congress has worked harder and more diligently on water resources' problems, and knows the field of water resources better than any Member of the House or Senate. He is chairman of the Committee on Public Works Subcommittee on Flood Control of the House of Representatives and he has served in that capacity for a number of years.

He is familiar with the projects throughout the country and has dedicated himself to studying the problems of water-resources development and trying to devise a sound and prudent method for Federal investment in these types of projects.

Cliff, we are delighted to have the opportunity to come to Memphis to visit with you and get some of your knowledge firsthand. We are going to ask you to sit with us so that you may from time to time give us some information that will lead us to make more careful inquiries into the matters that are elicited from the various witnesses.

I want to say to you that we always look forward to coming to Memphis and more especially coming to Memphis when you are here and can show us the true Southern hospitality.

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STATEMENT OF HON. CLIFFORD DAVIS, A REPRESENTATIVE IN

CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF TENNESSEE

Mr. Davis. Thank you.
Mr. JONES. It is good to have you, Mr. Davis.

Mr. Davis. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I certainly want to express my very deep, genuine, and sincere appreciation for those kind words you had to say about me. Of course I say this facetiously, but maybe not too facetiously since this is an off-election year as far as Members of Congress are concerned, but a kind word from a colleague from a different State always is helpful.

Mr. JONES. I might say you know I am in a rather unique position. I serve on the committee of which you are chairman so if I do not say good things about you you are likely to fire me.

Mr. Davis. Thank you again, Mr. Chairman. It is fortunate that we have more of you members from distant sections of the country present in Memphis, the very center of the Midsouth-midway between the city of Chicago and the city of New Orleans.

This is a rapidly growing section in every possible way: I can start with culture and churches and schools and go to Army installations, industry, business, chemicals, or almost any part of our economy. You will find them all affected very substantially in this wide area, even reaching into your own district of Alabama, Mr. Jones. We are always glad to have Members of Congress come to this great city so that you can see the way in which we live and you can find a solution to some of our problems.

You will pardon me, but I am not going to make any long statement since we have a few witnesses who know a great deal about this situation. I can say, though, Mr. Chairman, that these gentlemen are well qualified to give you their views. While there may be some others who may volunteer to make statements, those few who will make statements to

you will not take up your time unduly but will come right to the point. They have thought these matters through and will give you their best judgment.

I have been amazed at the very great interest expressed by other sections of the country on water resources and water control. A great many people in this country do not yet realize that 47 percent of the surface water of this big country of ours carries right down the Mississippi River, right by our front door, into the gulf.

By the way, I am delighted to see General Hardin, the president of the Mississippi River Commission, present here. He is one of the ablest engineer officers we have ever had in the long, fine history of the Corps of Engineers. Perhaps he will add something here. Of course you know him personally, Mr. Chairman.

A great many people in this country are surprised to know that we have this demand being made on us to take care of these waters. I think

you will find the river here very low now. We have had a shortage of water in that river but we never know when the river will be

come wild and with disastrous consequences when it takes the flow to the gulf. We have to be prepared for that. However, I come back to one other thing: That you find a new interest in flood control in other sections of the country because of the disastrous damage and great destruction done in New England, not once, but twice in a matter of a couple of months. So I will tell you as a member of our committee, and your colleagues on this subcommittee that the leadership in the House has been in contact with me. We will have a whale of a bill offered this next session, General Hardin, from other sections of the country. Of course, we have to come along with our own also.

They are thinking about control of water everywhere. We know that we must control the waters but we feel that God has given us this abundance of water. I cannot quote the engineers exactly, but their philosophy is that you have to help the river do what the river wants to do. You cannot change the course of a river too many times. If that river decides to change its course you have to go along and help it do what it wants to do. In helping it do that you are going to have to help the people along its banks.

Secondly, the engineers have the philosophy that since we have this God-given stream it should be used for the public welfare. I wish it were possible for all of you to have taken the trip that I have with General Hardin down the Mississippi on a steamer where you could see the levee protections that have been built and where you would meet barges going in both directions all during the day and night, sometimes with a trainload of tonnage, and carrying petroleum products and many other things. We had our good friend from Michigan, Mr. George Dondero, there with us. Of course he was very much interested in automobiles since he comes from Michigan. George was absolutely carried away when he saw—and I can stand corrected on this amount-seven or eight hundred automobiles on a barge coming down the river. It was really a beautiful sight with all of these variegated colors on the automobiles, to see seven or eight hundred of them come down on this barge and land in our big harbor project which is important to the economy of our country. They unload those cars and they put about a gallon of gasoline in them and drive them out of here heading ultimately to the Far West and the South, the Northeast and the Northwest, the Southeast and the East—in every direction.

I am making the point here that we use the river for commerce and for the great general welfare of our people. You see a constant stream of business going back and forth on the river. I want to say to my colleagues from other parts of the country that long ago I came to the very definite conclusion that what helps one section of the country is bound sooner or later to help other sections of the country. And, so help me, the longer I stay in Congress--and seniority matures a man in his thoughts and reasonableness-the more I try to back some of you with your projects in other sections of the country. I say, "Can't I be for that because of the general welfare of this great country of ours?"

You will pardon me for saying too much, but I accept with very great pleasure the opportunity and honor to sit here with you.

Colonel Kittrell, I think, is in possession of the list of witnesses who will testify before you today. I know Colonel Kittrell is going to make a statement himself. We are in accord on this.

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