Elements of International Law

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Stevens and sons, limited, 1904 - Počet stran: 848
 

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SECT
65
Real Union under the same Sovereign
67
Of the external Sovereignty of these States
74
Executive Power
80
ABSOLUTE INTERNATIONAL RIGHTS OF STATES
86
63a Legal aspect of intervention
93
British interference in the affairs of Portugal in 1826
101
Interference of the five great European Powers in the Belgic
119
296a Civil
121
76ac Instances of Intervention
126
Rules laid down by Huberus
131
Clutterbuck
133
82b Effect of Birth in various States
137
87a Matrimonial Domicile
143
417
145
Lex fori
150
520
151
Exemption of foreign Ships of War entering the ports
156
101b Other Property of foreign Sovereigns
162
103de Merchant Vessels in foreign parts
168
109a Abandonment of the custom
177
SECT
180
113a Jurisdiction of British Courts over crimes committed abroad
184
The Ashburton Treaty
190
Duke of Wellington Bello Corrunes The 598
191
Extradition Treaties
196
PAGE
197
Whether the Slavetrade is prohibited by the Law
206
Right of Visitation and Search
212
133b Fugitive Slaves
217
340a The Flag as evidence of Ships Nationality
218
622
219
Transfer of Property under foreign Bankrupt Proceedings
222
Bankruptcy
228
151a Validity of a foreign Divorce in England
235
E Change of Domicile
241
P Former Discussion between England and America as to
247
RIGHTS OF EQUALITY
252
CHAPTER IV
260
176a Occupations on the African Coast
275
Claims to portions of the Sea upon grounds of Prescription
283
Whether the Baltic Sea is mare clausum ?
289
Incidental Right to use the Banks of Rivers
298
205a Treaty of Washington as to the St Lawrence
314
PART THIRD
321
SECT
322
Ministers of the Third Class
328
225b Suits by and against Ministers
334
Exemption of the Ministers House and Property
340
Sailing under the Enemys Licence
341
Duties and Taxes
354
249b Case of Mr Bunch
360
Justification of refusal to ratify
372
Transitory Conventions perpetual in their Nature
377
277
378
Treaties the operation of which ceases in certain cases
389
No obligation as to foreign Laws
397
Hostages for the execution of Treaties
402
288d Conferences
408
Effect of Reprisals
414
Commencement of War is liable to Confiscation
420
Opinion of Vattel
422
The modern Rule
423
Rule of Reciprocity
424
3034 Seizure of Enemys Property found within the territorial limits of the belligerent State on the Declaration of War considered in Brown v United ...
425
304a Practice of the Crimean War
431
Practice of the United States
432
308a Confiscation of Public and Private Debts
433
30910 Trading with the Enemy unlawful on the part of Sub jects of the Belligerent State
434
31114 Decisions of the American Courts as to Trading with the Public Enemy
437
Strictness of the Rule 443 315a Relaxation of Rules against Trade with the Enemy
443
315c Contracts with Neutrals to be performed in Enemys Country
444
Trade with the Common Enemy unlawful on the part of Allied Subjects
445
Contracts with the Enemy prohibited
446
32023 Species of Residence constituting such Domicile
448
32425 The Native Character easily reverts
450
32627 Case of Persons removing from the Enemys Country on the breaking out of War
453
Domicile distinguished from Allegiance
455
Effect of Domicile in a Foreign State
457
Effect of retaining Foreign Domicile 332 Time for Election to change Domicile not allowed
460
Distinction between Private Property taken by Sea and
497
Atlas The
500
358a Abolition of Privateering
503
3612 Recaptures from Pirates
507
Recapture of Neutral Property 509 3645 No Salvage on Neutral Vessels and Goods recaptured
509
Exception when Ship might have been confiscated by the Enemy
511
Recapture from an Enemy
513
3689 Rule of amicable Retaliation or Reciprocity applied to re capture of the Property of Allies
514
American Law adopts the rule of reciprocity as to Restitution of the Property of Friendly Nations recaptured from an Enemy
517
Laws of different countries as to Recapture
518
American Law
519
French
520
Spanish Law
522
Portuguese Law
523
What constitutes a setting forth as a Vessel of War under the Prize Act
524
Actual Rescue necessary for Military Salvage for recapture
525
Salvage on second recapture
528
384b Joint capture of Booty
529
Validity of maritime captures determined in the Courts of the Captors Country
530
Jurisdiction of the Courts of the Captor how far exclusive
531
Condemnation by Consular Tribunal sitting in the Neutral Country
532
Unjust Sentence of a Foreign Court Grounds of Reprisal
533
3923 Distinction between Municipal Tribunals and Courts of Prize
534
Report on the Silesian Loan causes
538
Mixed Commission under Treaty of 1794
540
Danish Indemnities under Treaty of 1830
541
397a Municipal Laws administered in Prize Courts
542
Jus postliminiz
543
Rules for interpreting Conventions of Truce
545
Ransom of captured Property
553
CHAPTER III
564
Conventional or Guaranteed Neutrality
574
Vessels chased into Neutral Territory and captured there
581
434a Reception of belligerent Cruisers in Neutral Ports
587
434e Rules of other Countries
589
434f Prizes fitted out as Ships of War
590
Arming and equipping of Vessels and enlisting Men within the Neutral Territority by either Belligerent unlawful
591
Prohibition enforced by American Municipal Statutes
592
439abb Neutrality Laws of Great Britain and the United States and Cases arising under them
595
How far the immunity of the Neutral Territory extends to Neutral Vessels on the High Seas
613
Distinction between Public and Private Vessels
614
Usages of Nations subjecting Enemys Goods in Neutral Vessels to capture
615
Goods of a Friend on board the Ships of an Enemy liable to confiscation by the Prize Codes of some Nations
616
The two maxims of Free Ships Free Goods and Enemy Ships Enemy Goods not necessarily connected
617
Conventional Law as to Free Ships Free Goods
619
Treaties of Holland on the subject
620
Portuguese Treaty 449 Union of the Two Maxims in Treaties
622
Armed Neutrality of 1780
623
modified by Treaty
625
Conflict in Provisions of Treaties with England and France
627
45670 Discussion between the American and Prussian Govern ments
628
459
632
Rule in American Prize Courts
644
Covering Enemies Goods in Neutral Ships by False Papers
645
Rule of Enemy Ships Enemy Goods not applicable when the Goods are shipped before War 646 475 The Two Maxims in later Treaties
646
475a The Declaration of Paris
648
4779 Classification of Goods as Contraband by Grotius Vattel and Bynkershoek
649
4807 How far Naval Stores are Contraband
650
Provisions and Naval Stores when Contraband independently of Treaty
656
501ab Classification of Contraband Goods
667
Bowens 221 Hanover 33
672
Transportation of Military Persons and Despatches in
673
The Ship must be taken in delicto
679
508b Difference between Carriage by Land and Sea
686
Knowledge of the Party
693
Some Act of Violation necessary
699
Forcible Resistance by an Enemy Master
708
537a Torpedoes and the Obstruction of Channels
721
540
724
Uti possidetis the basis of every Treaty of Peace unless
728
A British and American Naturalization Acts
735
B Extradition Acts
745
English Naval Prize Act
773
E Treaty of Washington
783
F Hague Convention for the Pacific Settlement of International
797
G Declaration of Paris
803
K AngloFrench Agreement of 1904
810
INDEX
817
622
819
Perfect or imperfect War 417
848

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Strana 772 - States, fit out and arm, or attempt to fit out and arm, or procure to be fitted out and armed, or shall knowingly be concerned in the furnishing, fitting out, or arming, of any ship or vessel with intent that such ship or vessel shall be employed in the service of any foreign prince or State, or of any colony, district, or people...
Strana 381 - Majesty's dominions in America ; and that the American fishermen shall have liberty to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, harbours, and creeks of Nova Scotia, Magdalen Islands, and Labrador, so long as the same shall remain unsettled...
Strana 607 - A neutral government is bound— First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a power with which it is at peace...
Strana 99 - With the movements in this hemisphere we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes which must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the allied powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America.
Strana 283 - Parties, that the Inhabitants of the said United States shall have forever, in common with the Subjects of His Britannic Majesty, the Liberty to take Fish of every kind on that part of the Southern Coast of Newfoundland which extends from Cape Ray to the Rameau Islands, on the Western and Northern Coast of Newfoundland, from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands on the Shores of the Magdalen Islands, and also on the Coasts, Bays, Harbours, and Creeks from Mount Joly on the Southern Coast of Labrador,...
Strana 381 - Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish. And also that the inhabitants of the United States shall have liberty to take fish of every kind on such part of the coast of Newfoundland as British fishermen shall use (but not to dry or cure the same on that island) and also on the coasts, bays, and creeks of all other of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Strana 283 - And the United States hereby renounce forever, any liberty heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, or cure fish on, or within three marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbours of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Strana 558 - The laws, rights, and duties of war apply not only to armies, but also to militia and volunteer corps fulfilling the following conditions: 1. To be commanded by a person responsible for his subordinates; 2. To have a fixed distinctive emblem recognizable at a distance; 3. To carry arms openly; and 4. To conduct their operations in accordance with the laws and customs of war. In countries where militia or volunteer corps constitute the army, or form part of it, they are included under the denomination...
Strana 737 - STATUS of aliens in the United Kingdom:— II. Heal and personal property of every description may be taken, acquired, held, and disposed of by an alien in the same manner in all respects as by a natural-born British subject; and a title to real and personal property of every description may be derived through, from, or in succession to an alien, in the same manner in all respects as through, from, or in succession to a natural-born British subject...
Strana 98 - ... principle satisfactory to themselves, to have interposed, by force, in the internal concerns of Spain. To what extent such interposition may be carried on the same principle, is a question in which all independent powers whose governments differ from theirs are interested, even those most remote, and surely none more so than the United States.

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