An Introduction to the Invertebrates

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Cambridge University Press, 21. 9. 2006 - Počet stran: 355
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So much has to be crammed into today's biology courses that basic information on animal groups and their evolutionary origins is often left out. This is particularly true for the invertebrates. The second edition of Janet Moore's An Introduction to the Invertebrates fills this gap by providing a short updated guide to the invertebrate phyla, looking at their diverse forms, functions and evolutionary relationships. This book first introduces evolution and modern methods of tracing it, then considers the distinctive body plan of each invertebrate phylum showing what has evolved, how the animals live, and how they develop. Boxes introduce physiological mechanisms and development. The final chapter explains uses of molecular evidence and presents an up-to-date view of evolutionary history, giving a more certain definition of the relationships between invertebrates. This user-friendly and well-illustrated introduction will be invaluable for all those studying invertebrates.
 

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Fig 21 a Basic cladogram
13
Fig 22
16
Porifera
23
Cnidaria
32
On being aworm
47
Platyhelminthes and
65
Nemertea
75
Nematoda
90
Crustacea
168
Chelicerata and Myriapoda
181
Insecta
192
Fig154 contd
203
Animalswithlophophores
213
Echinodermata
222
Invertebrate Chordata and
236
Development
247

Annelida
101
general
120
Bivalvia and
135
general
153
itheeggiisyncitium
253
Invertebrateevolutionaryhistory
263
WHAT DO GENES TELLUS ABOUT RELATIONSHIPSBETWEEN THE EARLIEST PHYLA?
265

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Strana 2 - Malthus on Population, and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that under these circumstances favourable variations would tend to be preserved, and unfavourable ones to be destroyed. The result of this would be the formation of new species. Here, then, I had at last got a theory by which to work...
Strana 8 - ... order with a tapering root. ACONITINE, a most virulent poison from aconite, and owing to the very small quantity sufficient to cause death, is very difficult of detection when employed in taking away life. ACORN-SHELLS, a crustacean attached to rocks on the sea-shore, described by Huxley as "fixed by its head," and "kicking its food into its mouth with its legs.

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O autorovi (2006)

Janet Moore is former Director of Studies in Biological Sciences at New Hall, Cambridge where she is now an Emeritus Fellow. Her research career has focused on land and freshwater nemertines.

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