Vision and Certitude in the Age of Ockham: Optics, Epistemology, and the Foundations of Semantics, 1250-1345

Přední strana obálky
Brill Archive, 1988 - Počet stran: 428
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When William of Ockham lectured on Lombard's "Sentences" in 1317-1319, he articulated a new theory of knowledge. Its reception by fourteenth-century scholars was, however, largely negative, for it conflicted with technical accounts of vision and with their interprations of Duns Scotus. This study begins with Roger Bacon, a major source for later scholastics' efforts to tie a complex of semantic and optical explanations together into an account of concept formation, truth and the acquisition of certitude. After considering the challenges of Peter Olivi and Henry of Ghent, Part I concludes with a discussion of Scotus's epistemology. Part II explores the alternative theories of Peter Aureol and William of Ockham. Part III traces the impact of Scotus, and then of Aureol, on Oxford thought in the years of Ockham's early audience, culminating with the views of Adam Wodeham. Part IV concerns Aureol's intellectual legacy at Paris, the introduction of Wodeham's thought there, and Autrecourt's controversies.
 

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Obsah

From the Baconian Synthesis to the Epistemology of John
27
John Duns Scotus
55
Peter Aureol
85
William of Ockham
113
Oxford Between Scotus and Ockham
157
the Views
180
Oxford in the 1320s
209
Oxford in the 1330s
243
Adam Wodeham at London and Oxford
275
The Interpreters of Scotus and Aureol
315
Adam Wodehams First Parisian Readers
353
Bibliography
384
Index manuscriptorum
403
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