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C. WHITING, BEAUFORT HOUSE, STRAND

CONTENTS OF THE THIRD PART

PAGB

1

47

The Elm Tree : a Dream in the Woods. By Thomas Hood, Esq.

Short Rides in an Author's Omnibus. By Horace Smith, Esq. 14, 151, 548

The Barnabys in America. By Mrs. Trollope (continued) 17, 161, 297, 494

The Poppy: a Poem. By Horace Smith, Esq.

46

The Snow-Storm. By the Hon. Charles Stuart Savile

Epigram: the Superiority of Machinery. By T. Hood, Esq.

53

On the Physiology of Lying. By p.

54

A First Attempt in Rhyme, By T. Hood, Esq.

53

Reminiscences of a Medical Student. No. VIII., Leah Meriel-No.

IX., A Confession-Nos. X., XI., Story of a Genius 65, 236, 379, 478

Love (stanzas). By Marc Logon

86

The Love of the Country

87

The Five Incumbents. By the Author of " Peter Priggins.” No. 11.,

The Rector of Rushley–No. III., The Curate of Mossbury-No.

IV., The Rector of Squashyfield-No. V., The Vicar of Ditchingly

95, 192, 327, 507

An Hour at Mass (stanzas). By a Medical Student

112

The First of September ; or, a Day's Partridge Shooting. By Ornither 113

Phineas Quiddy; or, Sheer Industry (continued). By John Poole, Esq.,

Author of “ Paul Pry,” &c.

121, 466

More Hullahbaloo. By Thomas Hood, Esq.

145

Epigram : on a late Cattle-show in Smithfield. By T. H.

150

Horse and Foot. By Thomas Hood, Esq.

157

The Season (stanzas). By T. H.

160

The Sun's Eclipse (poem). By Horace Smith, Esq.

184

The Student of Louvain. By Elizabeth Youatt

186

Persons whom Every Body has Seen. By Laman Blanchard, Esq. 209, 289, 544

Contributions to a Fashionable Vocabulary. By k.

213

Some Account of the Macaronic Poets of England and Scotland. Chap.

II. References for further information-William Meston, of Aber-

deen-Dr. Geddes, of Banff

232

Philomelophagy. By Peregrine

232

On Settlements and Settlers

257

Every-Day Lying. By Laman Blanchard, Esq.

264

News from China. By the Editor

281

A Moscow Councillor of Medicine. From the Note-Book of an Anglo-

Russian

323

Good Intentions. By u.

346

No! Verses on November. By Thomas Hood, Esq.

35+

Ricciarda de' Selvaggia ; a Legend of Pistoia. By Elizabeth Youatt 355

A Morning Thought. By Thomas Hood, Esq.

361

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A Glance at Gower and “the Gowerians." By D. T. Evans, Esq. 362

Martha Beynon : a Story

364

Boz in America. By Thomas Hood, Esq.

396

More News from China. By the Editor

423
The Late Tour in Search of the Picturesque. By Laman Blanchard, Esq. 131

The Hot-Water Cure

439

Sonnet. By T. H.

455

School Friendships : an Anecdote. By p.

456

Rondeau. By T. H.

493

Epigram. By T. H.

525

Diary and Correspondence of Madame D'Arblay

526

The Persian Banditti. By the Hon. Charles Stuart Savile

431
Literature of the Month (for SEPTEMBER): The Queens of England.

Vol. V. By Miss Srickland.- Percival 'Keene. By Captain Marryat,
C.B.- Newfoundland in 1842. By Sir Richard Bonnycastle, Lieut.-
Col., R.E.—Russia and the Russians in 1842. By M. Kohl 131 to 144

(for October): Shakspeare. Edited by C.
Knight, Esq.—The Czarina. By Mrs. Hofland

269 to 279
(for NOVEMBER): Narrative of the Expedition
to China. By Com. J. Elliot Bingham, R.N.—The Nabob at Home;
or, the Return to England.-Self-devotion; or, the History of Ka.
therine Randolph.—Nimrod Abroad, noticed.-Letters of Mary
Queen of Scots, and Documents connected with her personal His-
tory : with an Introduction. By Miss Agnes Strickland. — The Miser's
Daughter : a Tale. By William Harrison Ainsworth, Esq. 406 to 422

(for December): Historical Memoirs of

the Queens of France. By Mrs. Forbes Bush.-Russia and the

Russians in 1842. By J. G. Kohl, Esq.— The Naval Club ; or, Remi-

niscences of Service. By M. H. Barker, Esq. (JThe Old Sailor”). 3

vols.— The Literary Ladies of England; from the commencement of

the last century to the present time. By Mrs. Elwood, author of " An

Overland Journey to India.” 2 vols.—Heath's Book of Beauty for

1842. Edited by the Countess of Blessington.-Phineas Quiddy.--

Norway and her Laplands in 1841

555 to 566

THE

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

THE ELM TREE:

A DREAM IN THE Woods.

BY THE EDITOR.

And this our life, exempt from public hauut,
Finds tongues in trees.

As You LIKE IT.

'Twas in a shady Avenue,
Where lofty Elms abound-

And from a Tree

There came to me
A sad and solemn sound,
That sometimes murmur'd overhead,

And sometimes underground.

Amongst the leaves it seem'd to sigh,

Amid the boughs to moan;
It mutter'd in the stem and then

The roots took up the tone;
As if beneath the dewy grass

The Dead began to groan.

No breeze there was to stir the leaves ;

No bolts that tempests launch,
To rend the trunk or rugged bark;

No gale to bend the branch;
No quake of earth to heave the roots,

That stood so stiff and staunch.
Sept.- VOL. LXVI. XO. CCLXI.

B

No bird was preening up aloft,

To rustle with its wing ;
No squirrel, in its sport or fear,
From bough to bough to spring;

The solid bole

Had ne'er a hole
To hide a living thing!

No scooping hollow cell to lodge
A furtive beast or fowl,

The martin, bat,

Or forest cat
That nightly loves to prowl,
Nor ivy nook so apt to shroud

The moping, snoring owl.
But still the sound was in my ear,

A sad and solemn sound,
That sometimes murmur'd overhead,

And sometimes underground'Twas in a shady Avenue

Where lofty Elms abound.
O hath the Dryad still a tongue

In this ungenial clime ?
Have Sylvan Spirits still a voice

As in the classic prime-
To make the forest voluble,

As in the olden time?

The olden time is dead and gone;

Its years have fill'd their sumAnd e'en in Greece_her native Greece

The Sylvan Nymph is dumbFrom ash, and beech, and aged oak,

No classic whispers come.

From Poplar, Pine, and drooping Birch, And fragrant Linden Trees;

No living sound

E'er hovers round, Unless the vagrant breeze, The music of the merry bird,

Or hum of busy bees.

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