The Nature of the Fine Arts

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Macmillan, 1885 - Počet stran: 359
 

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Strana 107 - Imitations produce pain or pleasure, not because they are mistaken for realities, but because they bring realities to mind.
Strana 316 - It is true that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.
Strana 238 - I must therefore desire him to remember, that by " the pleasures of the imagination," I mean only such pleasures as arise originally from sight, and that I divide these pleasures into two kinds...
Strana 235 - The poet's eye, in a fine phrenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven ; And, as imagination bodies forth The form of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shape, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name...
Strana 17 - Letters from the Hay-market inform us, that, on Saturday night last, the opera of Pyrrhus and Demetrius was performed with great applause. This intelligence is not very acceptable to us friends of the theatre ; for the stage being an entertainment of the reason and all our faculties, this way of being pleased with the suspense of them for three hours together, and being given up to the shallow satisfaction of the eyes and ears only, seems to arise rather from the degeneracy of our understanding,...
Strana 86 - Vandyke, as a perfect representation of the character as well as the figure of the man. He agreed it was very fine, but it wanted spirit and contrast, and had not the flowing line, without which a figure could not possibly be graceful. When we entered the Gallery, I thought I could perceive him recollecting his Rules by which he was to criticise Raffaelle. I shall pass over his observation of the boats being too little, and other criticisms of that kind, till we arrived at St. Paul preaching. "This...
Strana 181 - ON a superficial view, we may seem to differ very widely from each other in our reasonings, and no less in our pleasures : but notwithstanding this difference, which I think to be rather apparent than real, it_is probable that the standard both of reason and taste is the same in all human creatures.
Strana 86 - Criticism, which he emitted with that volubility which generally those orators have, who annex no ideas to their words. As we were passing through the rooms, in our way to the Gallery, I made him observe a whole length of Charles the...
Strana 238 - There are few words in the English language which are employed in a more loose and uncircumscribed sense than those of the fancy and the imagination.
Strana 238 - Next to the measure of the language, the principal distinction appears to me to consist in this: that Poetry admits of but few words expressive of very abstracted ideas, whereas Prose abounds with them. And as our ideas derived from visible objects are more distinct than those derived from the objects of our other senses, the words expressive of these ideas belonging to vision make up the principal part of poetic language. That is, the Poet writes principally to the eye, the Prose-writer uses more...

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