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The 128th Annual Meeting was held in Rockville on Tuesday, April 20, 1920, with a good attendance. We were glad to welcome Dr. W. R. Tinker of South Manchester, Delegate from Hartford County, who addressed the meeting. Dr. J. A. Higgins of Hartford, who was to read a paper on "Observations on Work of the Chest," was unable to be present so that the only paper read was by Dr. C. E. Peterson, D.D.S., on "Oral Hygiene in its Relation to Preventive Medicine." It was most interesting and instructive.

The Secretary reported all dues paid.

Respectfully submitted,
THOS. F. ROCKWELL.

Windham County, Dr. S. B. Overlock, Councilor. Mr. President and Gentlemen of the House of Delegates:

Medical matters in Windham County have progressed in their usual orderly manner during the past year. Those members of the County Society who were in the service have returned and reassumed their place and practice. None were killed or materially crippled and they were welcomed back with due pride in their achievements by those who were not privileged to take as prominent a part as they in the service of the nation.

Two successful meetings have been held during the year. The Councilor makes the same well-worn complaint in regard to these meetings as has been made in former years. In a small society every member should make a full effort to be present at each meeting. The absence of only one member is appreciably noticeable where the membership is small. The full scientific programme should not be made up by a single paper given by some man not a member of the County Society. These papers from outside men are always profitable and interesting but should not be taken as an excuse by local men for not participating in the work of each meeting.

There has developed in certain parts of the county a condition that should be of interest to every inhabitant of the county both layman and physician. This is the lack of full and adequate

medical attendance for the rural communities. The epidemic of influenza of two years ago sharply accentuated this condition of affairs. No doubt, at that time, the absence of some of the practitioners of the county in the service made the condition more apparent, but the fact remains, that there are at present many localities that are not receiving proper medical service. Dr. Bowers, Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Registration, stated that there are seventy-six towns in that state which are wholly without medical assistance. Within the limits of Windham County there are at least six towns in which no physician is located. One of these towns is near a larger place, from which good medical service can be obtained. The others are not so fortunately located. These towns formerly had one, and some of them two physicians, located and in active practice within their borders. What is true of Windham County is doubtless true of the other counties of the state in greater or less degree and what is true in Massachusetts is doubtless true of other New England states, hence it has seemed proper to include it in this report before the State Society.

Of the people who constitute these communities, the great majority are of moderate or limited means. Owing to this fact, when they secure medical attendance from other towns, if they are fortunate enough to do so, the fee that must be laid upon them for services, long distances traveled, and time consumed, is in many instances a genuine hardship for the patient or his immediate family. Under such circumstances, these people neglect or defer calling a physician unless the patient appears to be dangerously ill. Taking these facts into consideration, it can be readily seen that an apparently innocent sore throat may be the foundation of an epidemic of virulent diphtheria, entailing expense, suffering, and possible mortality upon the community, all of which might have been prevented, or at least modified, by adequate medical supervision.

In the larger centers many manufacturers have established in connection with their plants a hospital room with a nurse or physician, or both, in attendance for the care of employees. The larger centers have district nurses and some of the industrial insurance companies have nurses who regularly look after their

insured. All of this work is commendable both from a humanitarian and economic standpoint, but none of these reach the isolated communities. From these communities, composed almost entirely of old New England stock, have come, in the past, the men and women who have done the greater work of the nation. These communities deserve every care that is possible and one of their pressing needs at present is adequate medical service.

What can be done to remedy or modify these conditions? In Windham County the two public hospitals, though operating constantly above normal capacity, can care for the major surgical work and in part for the obstetrical needs of such communities within the borders of the county. For minor emergencies, ordinary illnesses, and contagious diseases, they are not in position to render efficient service. A resident physician in each community, alone, could do this. This, under existing circumstances, is not possible. The graduate of to-day does not locate in small towns as did his predecessor of fifty years ago. No blame can be attached to him for this. The pre-medical education, expanded medical course, together with a hospital internship, require so much more in time, work, and expense compared with fifty years ago, that the graduate in medicine of to-day must locate in the larger communities if he receive returns commensurate, financially and socially, with what has been expended in securing the qualifications to practice in the medical profession. To the men who have been at work for a quarter of a century, or more, who during that time have watched with deep interest the advances made in medical education and attainments, there can be no thought of relaxation in the present requirements and thus allowing men of mediocre attainments to enter the ranks of the profession. To the layman this might seem a solution but not to the medical profession.

No attempt at a solution is offered in this report. The subject must be of interest to all. The condition bids fair to become more pressing as time goes on.

Respectfully submitted,

S. B. OVERLOCK,

Councilor.

1919

May 21 July 10 Sept. 13 Oct. 9

REPORT OF THE TREASURER.

DR. PHINEAS H. INGALLS, Hartford.
THE CONNECTICUT STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY, FROM
MAY 21, 1919, TO MAY 19, 1920.

RECEIPTS.

Balance from old account
From O. C. Smith Fund

Herbert Thoms, New Haven County
P. F. McPartland, Hartford County
Herbert Thoms, New Haven County
24 A. B. Lambert, Fairfield County

21

1920

Apr. 17 A. D. Marsh, Windham County
24 J. E. Flaherty, Tolland County
May 2 H. B. Hanchett, Litchfield County
S. S. Campbell, Middlesex County
4 H. B. Thoms, New Haven County
9 A. C. Freeman, New London County

II

C. B. Brainard, Hartford County 13 H. B. Lambert, Fairfield County

DISBURSEMENTS.

1919

May 29 John E. Lane, expenses Annual Meeting
James D. Gold, Anniversary Chairman
Hotel Stratfield

June 9 The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company

Miss J. G. Buhler, Stenographer

Hazel J. Thompson, Stenographer

27 Marie Westermann, Clerical work

John E. Lane, expense account American
Medical Association

Walter R. Steiner, expense account Ameri-
can Medical Association

II

July 7 The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company
Litchfield County Medical Society, dues
from O. C. Smith Fund ....
Middlesex County Medical Society, dues
from O. C. Smith Fund

$1,387.67

24.00

615.00

350.00

141.00

350.00

67.50

29.70

237.60

126.90

8.10

175.00

292.60

71.20 $3,876.27

$ 40.00

21.00
9.15

31.37

60.00

10.00

15.00

38.93

41.91

8.98

9.00

6.00

Sept. 19 Oct. 25 27

1920

Jan. 7

James F. Rogers, editing Proceedings
The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company
Charles W. Gardner

Marie Westermann

Tolland County Medical Association, 34
Annual Meeting
The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company
Frank H. Wheeler
Dec. 9 Marie Westermann

Nov. 21

May 11

New Haven County Medical Society, dues
from O. C. Smith Fund

1920

Jan. I

Windham County Medical Society, dues
from O. C. Smith Fund

.....

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1919

July I Coupons Railway and Lighting Co.
Coupons Consolidated Railway Co.
Coupons Gas Light Co.

Interest

Coupons Railway and Lighting Co.
Coupons Consolidated Railway Co.

Coupons Gas Light Co.

Interest

Balance on hand May 19, 1920

$ 6.00

3.00 150.00 2,235.94

5.00

2.50

31.69

42.62

10.53

5.00

2.00

5.00

5.00

25.00

16.30

10.00

20.10

298.85

38.57

127.86
543.97 $3,876.27

$1,685.07

112.50

40.00

20.00

33.70

112.50

40.00

20.00

37.82

$2,101.59

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