Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub

had a conference with Dr. John T. Black, Dr. Edward K. Root and Professor C.-E. A. Winslow, members of the State Board of Health. These gentlemen showed a gratifying interest in the proposition to convert the State Farm for Inebriates into a State Sanatorium for the Nervous Poor, but also called attention to the fact that a Connecticut Infirmary Commission had been appointed in May, 1919, "to investigate the need for the establishment of an infirmary under State control for the care and treatment of the following classes of persons: diseased, deformed and incurable persons for whom no treatment is available in the existing institutions; indigent and aged persons; the poor from such towns of the State as have no almshouse or are insufficiently equipped to care for them properly; State paupers as described in Sections 1642 and 1643 of the General Statutes."

It would seem advisable for the Committee on a Sanatorium for the Nervous Poor to coöperate to the fullest extent with the Connecticut Infirmary Commission and perhaps request this Commission to include in their plans the establishment of a Sanatorium for the Nervous Poor. At least two reasons would favor such action on the part of your Committee; one is the economic necessity for the State to systematize and unify its methods of institutional care and treatment of the sick, and the other is the well-known fact that a strictly medical committee always has great difficulty in persuading the legislature to grant its request. With the exception of Dr. Black, State Health Commissioner, the Connecticut Infirmary Commission is composed entirely of laymen.

The Chairman of your Committee further consulted Mr. Charles P. Kellogg, Secretary of the State Board of Charities and member as well of the Connecticut Infirmary Commission. Mr. Kellogg was disposed to view favorably the establishment of a Sanatorium for the Nervous Poor and made the suggestion that in case the State Farm for Inebriates at Norwich was not available, and in case the Sanatorium ought not to be closely connected with the State Infirmary, that possibly the Mystic Oral School might be found suitable. He stated that with the

completion of the new American School for the Deaf at West Hartford the Mystic Oral School would be discontinued and this property of the State would thus become available for other purposes.

Altogether it now would seem that your Committee on a Sanatorium for the Nervous Poor has an excellent opportunity in one way or another to fulfil its purpose and become a factor in the establishment of a State Institution which is greatly needed.

Respectfully submitted,

FRANK K. HALLOCK,

Chairman.

(It was voted that this Committee be continued.)

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE HISTORY OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION OF CONNECTICUT IN THE WORLD WAR.

DR. FRANK H. WHEELER, Chairman.

Mr. President and Members of the House of Delegates:

Your Committee on the History of the Medical Profession of Connecticut in the World War did not, at first, appreciate the magnitude of the task which you gave them one year ago.

We found that we must first of all get a complete list of all the men who had received commissions from the United States Government and were accredited to this State; next a list of all who were appointed on the various examining boards and finally a list of those who had been enrolled in the Volunteer Medical Service Corps.

The second and third lists were comparatively easy to obtain. That of the men who had received commissions was much more difficult. It necessitated comparing and checking up many fragmentary lists and a considerable correspondence. All this took much time and the hard and busy winter interrupted us. The getting of addresses is still going on but we now have a list

which we think approximates perfection though it is yet undergoing minor revisions.

It contains 503 names and the post office addresses of all but about twenty.

In order to get reliable statistics we had to communicate with each individual. For this purpose we sent out a form letter and a questionnaire, which was to be filled in and returned. (A copy of each is here appended.) Four hundred and eighty-two of these have been mailed and the balance will be sent out as soon as we get the addresses.

Three hundred and thirty-one questionnaires have been returned, leaving 151 still to come. They are coming in all the time, slowly. We propose to ultimately have them bound in book form and deposited in some secure place as the Society may determine.

It is probable that this report will contain the only available record of the medical men of this State who did their part in helping to win the great war. It is desirable, therefore, that it be made as complete as possible. About 170 men are still to be heard from and very little has been done toward collating the statistics gathered.

Your Committee would therefore respectfully request that this report be accepted as one of progress and that the Committee be continued to make their final report at some future time.

FRANK H. WHEELER,
D. CHESTER Brown,
GEORGE BLUMER,
WALTER R. STEINER,
JOHN E. LANE.

[blocks in formation]

The Connecticut State Medical Society appointed this committee to collect the data and put on record all the facts regarding the participation of the Medical Profession of the State of Connecticut in the World War. This is to include the war activities of the entire profession of the State whether members of any medical society or not.

The work of those who, though officially connected with the Government, had their activities confined to home localities is just as important as the work done by those who were sent overseas and should be Just as fully explained.

All the data must be obtained by personal communication as the lists at Washington, formerly available by states, are no longer filed in that manner.

It is urgently requested that every medical man and woman in the State assist the committee in making this a full and complete historical record, that future generations may know of the great work done by the Medical Profession in this War.

NEW HAVEN, CONN., Nov. 1, 1919

The Committee asks you to kindly fill out the enclosed questionnaire, at your earliest convenience, and mail it in the enclosed envelope.

STATE OF CONNECTICUT.

QUESTIONNAIRE ON MEDICAL ACTIVITIES IN THE WORLD War.

2. Date of birth

I.

Name

3. Present address

4. Address when commission was applied for

5. Graduate of what college

6. Year of graduation .....

12.

13. If so, in what hospital?

ADDRESS ALL LETTERS TO

FRANK H. WHEELER, M.D.
27 PERKINS STREET
NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

...

7. In what state did you apply for a commission?

8. Where were you examined?

9. Date commission was issued

IO.

When commissioned were you licensed to practice in Connecticut?

II. If so, how long had you been in practice?

Were you a hospital interne?

14. Branch of Service entered ...
15. Rank designated in Commission
16. If promoted, give rank and date
17. Date of discharge ....

18. If cited or the recipient of any distinguished reward, name it and quote the official announcement

On this page (and the next if required) give a complete sketch of your activities.

Suggestions for the sketch: date entered service; training camp in; what army in (American, English, French, etc.). If at the front, what sector; what battles in; if wounded. If in hospital work, name and location; specialty, if any. If transport service, vessel on; ports used. If in some special work, describe it. If in Red Cross, etc., give nature of work and place. Any interesting or unusual experiences you had.

(It was voted that the recommendations of the Committee be adopted and the Committee continued.)

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEDICAL
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.

DR. E. W. GOODENOUGH, Chairman.

Mr. President and Members of the House of Delegates:

The Department of Child Hygiene in the State Board of Health, the Special Child Hygiene Commission and the Connecticut Society of Child Hygiene are all ready for us to gain through them a fuller grasp of the public-school health possibilities. The newspapers and popular magazines have frequent articles on health matters. The public is ready, under the leadership of the physicians of the state, to make yearly increase in school health work. All good private schools and colleges have thorough medical examinations and medical control of sanitation.

Yale and other medical centers will soon be ready to give us, every year, nurses and physicians who have had training in public health. In all the larger towns and cities, it is up to us to see that the offices of health control are filled with physicians and nurses who have had special instruction, and, at their head, someone with executive ability to see that every means of health improvement toward school children is used. The examination

« PředchozíPokračovat »