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I.
II.

HINTS TO AGENTS.
FORMS OF POLICIES
CLASSIFICATION OF OCCUPATIONS

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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
713338
ASTOR, LENOX AND

TIL DEN FOUNDATIONS
R

1916

COPYRIGHT 1916 BY

THE SPECTATOR COMPANY

NEW YORK

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THE GOODS. In selling a concrete commodity the salesman illustrates and demonstrates patently. Insurance salesmanship is the highest form of salesmanship. The seller cannot instantly, palpably demonstrate the need and the value of his goods. He sells a “promise to pay."

Insurance is a contract of indemnity; for an agreed consideration one party guarantees another against loss.

Marine insurance is more than a thousand years old. Fire insurance several hundred years old. Life insurance nearly as old. Disability insurance is comparatively new.

Our grandparents knew and desired fire and life insurance. Familiarity has made them real essentials of life. Our parents could obtain guarantees of indemnity for pecuniary loss due to inability to attend to their livelihood because of accidental injuries. Only comparatively recently has disability insurance become known to the prudent, thrifty, far-sighted American.

The careful, sane, prudent nan obtains life insurance to protect his estate and to obtain due credit for his enterprises. He obtains fire insurance to protect his properties. He must have accident and health insurance to protect his livest asset-his ability to devote his brains, body, experience, influence to his daily business affairs.

A man will die once just once. He is liable to sustain many physical setbacks during an ordinary span of life. He may face the destruction of his property by fire or flood or tornado, and, even if he has no contract of indemnity, with his health, his strength, his credit, his influence, his experience, he can rebuild, replace his lost properties. But no millionaire, no genius, no Hercules can replace a lost eye or shriveled limb. He can obtain large cash indemnities, however, if he has had the prudence to insure his income.'

No physical setback ever made a man richer. Every physical setback-any accident or illness—costs something besides pain. Disability insurance is "income insurance.” It insures a man's income coming in when his outgo is increased because of some physical setback. The doctor's, druggist's, hospital's, nurse's bills, the cost of a substitute to do his work, etc., all mean extra expense. A man's income may not be immediately cut off or even temporarily lessened; but it certainly is not increased by reason of any physical setback.

His outgo, on the other hand, certainly is increased. To meet the increased pecuniary outgo, he must needs insure his income coming in. Accident and health insurance is the Paymaster in times of physical bankruptcy.

The cost is dependent upon the hazard of a worker's occupation, and, as regards illness indemnities, upon his age, as well. Nearly 7,000 occupations have been classified and rates deemed adequate for guaranteeing a certain weekly indemnity to each have been determined as well as indemnities for loss of life or limbs. Most companies issuing contracts of indemnity for such losses

*Copyright, 1916. by THE SPECTATOR COMPANY, New York,

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