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1801.-Mar. 4.

5.

8.

9.

18. Apr. 1.

5. 26.

29. May 14.

15.

At Washington.

Inaugurated as President.
Nominates Madison, Dearborn, and Lincoln to

Cabinet.
Nominates R. R. Livingston Minister to France.
Cabinet decide on list of removals.
Cabinet remit fines under Sedition law.

Offers Paine passage in public vessel.
Leaves Washington.
At Monticello.
Leaves Monticello.
At Washington.

Appoints Gallatin Secretary of Treasury.
Gallatin arrives at Washington.
Cabinet discuss Barbary war.
Squadron ordered to Mediterranean.
Netherland, Portuguese, and Prussian Missions

abolished.
Federalist Marshals and Attorneys to be re-

moved.
Leaves Washington.
At Monticello.
At Washington.

Replies to New Haven remonstrance.

Appoints Robert Smith Secretary of Navy.
Leaves Washington.
At Monticello.
Leaves Monticello.
At Washington.
Reduction of Naval officers.

xxi

16.

June 30.
July 2.

II.

12.

15.

30. Aug. 4. Sept. 28.

Oct. 3.

22.

1801.-Nov. 6.

Outlines method of conducting Executive busi

ness.

12.

28.

Dec. 8. 1802.-Jan. 6.

II.
18.

27.
Feb. 2.
Mar. 8.
Apr. 6.

26.
May 5.

8. June 2.

July 21.

25.

Oct. 7.

16.

21.

Nov. 15.
Dec. 15.

Drafts message on Duane, but suppresses it.
Appoints Granger Postmaster-General.
Sends first annual message.
Sends list of appointments to Senate.
Sends message on Washington City.
Cabinet decision in re Tripoli.
Sends message on Indians.
Sends message on military affairs.
Approves bill repealing Judiciary act.
Approves bill to repeal Internal taxes.

Approves Judiciary bill.
Leaves Washington.
At Monticello.
At Washington.

Attacked by Callender.
Leaves Washington.
At Monticello.
At Washington.

Right of deposit suspended.
Cabinet decision on Tripoline war.
Replies to Connecticut address.
Sends second annual message.
Sends special message on proceedings at New

Orleans.
Nominates Monroe Joint Minister to France.
Sends message on Spanish spoliations.
Sends secret message on Lewis and Clark ex-

pedition.
Sends message on Indians.
At Monticello.

Prepares estimate of Christ.
At Washington.

Talleyrand offers to sell Louisiana.
Louisiana treaty signed at Paris.
Writes article signed “Fair Play.”
Draws instruction for Lewis.
Writes answer to Gabriel Jones.
Frames Louisiana amendment to Constitution.
Cabinet discuss Louisiana treaty.

22.

1803.-Jan. 11.

18.

Mar. 17.
Apr.

9.

II.
May 2.
June

20.

July

Drafts “Queries" as to Louisiana.
At Monticello.
Makes informal reply to Ward Committee of

Philadelphia.

16.

22.

24.

1803.-July

Oct. I.

17.

20. Nov. ?

14. 30.

Dec. 5.

21.

24. 1804.- Jan. 8.

18.

26. Feb. 18.

Apr. 6.

17. May 1.

26.

Appoints Monroe Minister to Great Britain.
At Washington.

Sends third annual message.
Louisiana treaty ratified by Senate.
Frames rules of Public Etiquette.
Drafts bill for government of Louisiana.
Sends message on Barbary powers.
Transmits information concerning Louisiana.
Transmits additional information concerning

Louisiana.
Sends message on Barbary war.
Sends message on Spanish claims.
Replies to Address of legislature of Tennessee.
Offers Monroe governorship of Louisiana.
Sends message on taking possession of Louisiana.
Called on by Burr.
Cabinet discussion of Louisiana boundaries.

Approves act organizing Louisiana and Orleans.
At Monticello.

Daughter, Mary Eppes, dies.
At Washington.

Cabinet settle Tripoline terms.
Offers Armstrong French mission.

Appoints Monroe Minister to Spain.
At Monticello.
At Washington.

Cabinet discuss Spanish affairs.
Drafts bill for Harbor protection.
Re-elected President of United States.
Sends fourth annual message.
Nominates Bowdoin Minister to Spain.
Electoral votes counted by Congress.
Attorney-General Lincoln resigns.
Robert Smith appointed Attorney General.
Jacob Crowninshield appointed Secretary of

Navy.
Approves bill for Harbor protection.

Inaugurated as President.
At Monticello.
At Washington.

Prepares notes on Armed Vessels.

Cabinet discuss neutral commerce.
At Monticello.

Prepares notes on conduct in 1780-1.
Suggests alliance with Great Britain.

Aug. 7.
Oct. 6.

8.

Nov.

8.

19. 1805.-Feb. 2.

Mar. 2.

3. 4. 13.

19. July 4.

8.

20.

Aug.

1805.--Oct. II.

Nov. 12.

14.

19.

Dec. 3.

4.
6.

Dec, 20. 1806.— Jan. 13.

17. Feb. 6.

8.

19. 24.

28.

Mar. 14.

15?

At Washington.

Cabinet discuss Spanish affairs.
Cabinet frame terms for Spain.
Cabinet modify Spanish terms.
Sends fifth annual message.
Drafts resolutions on Spain for Congress.
Sends confidential message on Spain.
Drafts bill for a naval-militia.
Drafts bill classifying militia.
John Breckenridge nominated Attorney-General.
Sends message on Tripoline affairs.
Sends message on neutral commerce.
Sends confidential message on Great Britain.
Drafts resolutions concerning Spain.
Warned by Daveiss of Burr's plot.
Sends message on Western exploration.
Aids Barlow to draft bill for a National Uni-

versity.
Drafts bill for settling Orleans territory.
Nominates Bowdoin and Armstrong joint com-

missioners to Spain.
Pinkney selected by Cabinet for English mission,
Has interview with Burr.
Sends special message on Spanish boundaries.
Offers Cary commissionership to Spain.
Sends confidential message on Great Britain.
Cabinet decision on Spanish affairs.
Writes letter to Alexander of Russia.
Nominates Monroe and Pinkney joint commis-

sioners to Great Britain.
Cabinet discuss Leander incident.

Issues Leander proclamation.
At Monticello.
At Washington.
At Monticello.
At Washington.

20,

24.

25. Apr, 16.

19.

May 1.

3.

Cabinet discuss Burr plot.
Cabinet decision on Burr.
Orders to Wilkinson, in re Burr.
Issues proclamation against Burr.
Sends sixth annual message.
Sends special message on Great Britain.
Message on distressed French prepared, but not

sent.
Issues proclamation against Cambrian.

10. June 7. July 26.

Oct. 4.

22.

25. Nov. 8.

27. Dec. 2.

3. 15.

20.

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INAUGURAL ADDRESS.

[March 4, 1801) FRIENDS & FELLOW CITIZENS

Called upon to undertake the duties of the first Executive office of our country, I avail myself of the presence of that portion of my fellow citizens which is here assembled to express

1 This is the first draft, but it differs so little from the address as delivered that it does not seem necessary to also print the latter. In the Jefferson MSS. is the following, which I take to be a paragraph jotted down for the inaugural address, but for some reason not included.

“Wherever there are men there will be parties & wherever there are free men they will make themselves heard. Those of firm health & spirits are unwilling to cede more of their liberty than is necessary to preserve order, those of feeble constñs will wish to see one strong arm able to protect them from the many. These are the whigs and tories of nature. These mutual jealousies produce mutual security: and while the laws shall be obeyed all will be safe. He alone is your enemy who disobeys them. In all cases of danger or commotion learn to consider the laws as the standard to which you are to rally. If you find there your officers civil and military, go with them to the establishmt of order. If you find them not there, they are out of their place and must be brot back to the laws. Let this then be the distinctive mark of an American that in cases of commotion he enlists himself under no man's banner, enquires for no man's name but repairs to the standard of the laws. Do this & you need never fear anarchy or tyranny. Your govñt will be perpetual."

VOL. VIII.-I

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