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Whitchurch, in Hants.-The Rev. Aug. Hupfman to the vicarage of Berkeley, in the county of Gloucefter.- -The Rev. George Cope, B. A. to the prebend of Hundreton, in the cathedral of Hereford.- -The Rev. William Dealtry, of Bishopfthorp, M. A. to the rectory of Bamburgh, near Doncafter.- -The Rev. William Beecher, M. A. to the vicarage of Farnsfield, in Nottinghamshire.William Barrow, B. D. to the rectory of Beelfby, in Lincolnshire.-The Rev. William Pinchin, M. A. late fchoolmafter at Cambridge, chofen vicar choral and schoolmafter of Southwell.The Rev. Jonathan Boucher, M. A. to the vicarage of Eplom, in the county of Surrey.

DISPENSATIONS.

THE Rev. Humphry Summer, D. D. rector of Dunton Waylett, in the county of Effex, to hold the rectory of Capdock, with the vicarage of Wafhbrook annexed, in the county of Suffolk.

-The Rev. Herman Drewe, A. M. rector of Wootton-Fitzpaine, in Dorsetshire, to hold the rectory of Combrawleigh, in Devonshire.The Rev. Richard Eliot, M. A. vicar of Maker, in the county of Cornwall, to hold the vicarage of St. Teath, in the fame county.- -The Rev. Samuel Smyth, vicar of Walpole, St. Andrew, in the county of Norfolk, to hold the rectory of Dry-Drayton, in the county of Cambridge.The Rev. John Ruffel, B. L. rector of Helmdon, in the county of Northampton, to hold the rectory of Ilmington, in the county of Warwick. The Rev. Thomas Hunt, of the vicarage of Whiffundine, in the county of Rutland, together with the rectory of St. Peter in Stamford, in the county of Lincoln.

BANKRUPT S.

Nev. ANDRE, innholder. George Adams, NDREW SUTTON, of Gofport, in

23. late of Taunton, in Somersetshire, maltster.Richard Davis, of Towcefter, in Northamptonfhire, dealer.- -Francis Scott, now or late of Pitt-ftreet, near Charlotte-Atreet, tea-dealer. 27. Francis Philpot, of Barking, in Effex, brewer.- -James Fairbank, of Weft-Witton, in Yorkshire, milier. Richard Phelps, of Bridgewater, in Somerfetfhire, vintner. James Stafford, late of Holywell-lodge, near Durham, coal-fitter. Howell Howell, late of Conwilelvet, in Caermarthenshire, but now of Whitechapel-road, St. Mary, Whitechapel, tanner.30. Aaron Elias, of Queen-treet, Rofeinarylane, falefman.John Saunders, of Bromley, in Kent, haberdather, millener, hofier, and draper.- Griffieth Maikelyn, of Bristol, merchant- -Jofeph Robinton, of Bilpar, in Derbyshire, eotton- fpinner.- -Dec. 4. John Bringloe, of Norwich, grocer.- -Thomas Jarvoile, of Portsmouth-Common, in Hants, cutler.John Coutts, of Liverpool, merchant.- -James Appleton, of Stockton-upon-Tees, in the county of Durham, ham and butter-factor. James Harley, of High-Holbourn, linen-draper.James Burn, of Suffolk-ftreet, Charing-Crois, fcrivener.-Peter Warren, of Exchange-alley, St. Mary Woolnoth, London, infurance-broker.

William Hinton, late of Portsmouth-Common, in Hants, ironmonger.- -Henry Johnfon, of Colchester, in Effex.- -John Martinnant, of Marybone-ftreet, Golden-fquare, haberdafher.-7. James Williams, of Briftol, wine-merchant.- -Thomas Dempfey, of Liverpool, merchant.. William Fotter, of Stam ford, in Lincolnshire, but late of Spalding, in Lincolnshire, grocer.- Edward Wilfon, of St. Thomas, in Southwark, carpenter.John Booth, late of Smallwood, in the parish of Newbold Aftbury, in Cheshire, dealer.―Jane Elifabeth Moore, late of Bermondsey-street, St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondfey, Surrey, leatherdreffer, but now a prifoner in the King's-Bench prifon. Michael Harris, of Milbank, Weftminster, cornfactor.-11. John Smyth, of Maidstone, in Kent, cheesemonger.—Charles Speechly, of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, haber

dafher.

cer.

-Peter Rowbotham, of Oxford, mer-John Claude Raibaud, late of Pall-Mall, St. James, Weitminster, perfumer. - John Hinde, late of Pretton Hows, in Cumberland, but now of Houndfditch, London, merchant.Richard Benfon Walker, late of Hoddesdon, in Herts, but now of Kingfland, in Middlesex, merchant. 14. John Howell, of Chefter, timber-merchant.-William Andrew, of Manchefter, fuftian-manufacturer.-Michael Rafor of Leak, in Lincolnshire, grocer and draper.-John Clark, of St. Andrew, Holbourn, London, gunmaker.Thomas Addifon, of Pretton, in Lancashire, woolen-draper.-William Crofdale and James Barrow, both now or late of Liverpool, merchants and partners.-John Hatch, of Laytonstone, in Effex, grocer. Richard Rivers, of Great-Marlow, in Bucks, bargemalter. -Charles Child, of Ewhurft, in Surrey, fhopkeeperr.Thomas Forth, of Portpoollane, St. Andrew, Holbourn, pawnbroker.butter-feller. John Sowerby, of Liverpool, cheefemonger and Henry Wood, late of Bolington, in Cheshire, timber-merchant-James Wat terall, of Derby, miller and corniactor.Charles Carpenter, now or late of PlymouthDock, fhopkeeper.Thomas Baxter, of Southwark, victualler. James Morton, of Liverpool, irci monger. - Richard Middleton, late of Liverpool, merchant.-25. John Cuff,__of Baking, in Etex, cornchandler. -John Rogers Morgan, of Vine-court, Spitalfields, brewer.

-John Midlam, late of Sheffield, Yorkshire, grocer. John Kennion, the younger, of Liverpool, merchant.Jun. 4. Thomas Menham and Robert Hedgion, of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, iniounders and copartners.Jofeph Water(mart, of Coventry-ftreet, linen-draper.Thomas Barlow, of Manchefter, mercer and woolen-draper. William Townend, of Woolley, in Yorkshire, maltfter.James Barney, of Wolverhampton, in Staffordshire, malitei.

8.

Thomas Pyot, of Hathern, near Loughborough, in Leicefterfhire, carrier.--Samuel Kirkup, of Stockton, in the county of Durham, fhip-carpenter.-- Anthony Mealy, of Oxtoidftreet, hofier.- 11. Edward Greenhill, of the Strane, filverfmith and jeweller.—— John Hancock, late of Codlord, in Wilts, fhopkeeper, but now of Warminster, in Wilts maltster.

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PRICES of STOCKS, &c. in FEBRUARY, 1785.

Compiled by C. DOMVILLE, Stock-Broker, No. 95, Cornhill.

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N. B. In the 3 per Cent Confols. the highest and lowest Price of each Day is given; in the other Stocks the highest Price only.

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THE

LONDON MAGAZINE,

ENLARGED AND IMPROVED,

FOR

MARCH,

1785.

THE HISTORY OF THE SECOND SESSION OF THE SIXTEENTH PARLIAMENT OF GREAT-BRITAIN.

Begun and bolden at Westminster, on the 25th of January, 1785.

MR.
R. Pelham replied to the Chan-
cellor of the Exchequer, that
with whatever propriety he (Mr. Pel
ham) who was an enemy to reform in
parliament, and was of opinion, that
a member elected locally reprefented
generally the Commons of Great-Bri-
tain, and not merely his own confti-
tuents, might think that a burgefs of
Kirkwall reprefented Weftminster, it
was with a bad grace, indeed, that the
Chancellor of the Exchequer, who
would wish to be thought the fincere
champion for parliamentary reform,
fhould hazard the affertion of a fimilar
opinion. For his own part, repre-
fenting, as he did, a great county, and
ftanding upon a popular election, he
felt that the queftion of the Weftmin-
fter election did not near fo intimately
concern the right honourable member
who was abfent, as it did the Com-
mons of Great-Britain at large; it con-
cerned himfelf as much as it did the
right honourable member; it concerned
every man who would venture to ftand
upon popular principles for the honour
of reprefenting counties; it concerned
the whole body of the people at large.
Therefore, when he was ready to agree
to the propofed delay, it was not in
empty compliment to an abfent mem-
ber, as perfonally interested in the bu-
finefs, but becaufe, acquainted as he
was with the unbounded abilities of
that gentleman, he thought the Com-
mons of Great-Britain would act un-
wifely, if, by precipitating a queftion
of fo much moment, they fhould de-
LOND. MAG. March 1785.

peo

prive themselves of the affiftance of fo
able a member. The Chancellor of
the Exchequer expected credit for the
fincerity of his wishes to procure a re-
form of the reprefentation of the
ple in parliament; but the people had
ftill to look for the fruits of those
wishes; and they had no very great
encouragement to expect to fee them,
when they confidered the measures that
fome members had countenanced, in
order to keep thofe out of parliament
who had a right to fit in it; and, in-
ftead of what the right honourable
member called bad or defective re-
prefentation, to leave them no repre-
fentation at all. The right honoura-
ble member maintained, that repre-
fentatives were bound to obey the in-
ftructions of their conftituents; but he
took care that the electors of Weft-
minfter fhould have no members to
whom they could fend their inftruc-
tions. This, he thought, argued no
good to the cause of reform, to which
the right honourable member affected
to be fo very fincere a friend. The
motion for a delay of the proceedings
in the Westminster bufinefs he intend-
ed to give his fupport, not because the
right honourable member who was ab-
fent was more nearly concerned in it
than himself, or any other country
member in the Houfe, but because he
was convinced that himself, and other
country gentlemen, would derive fo
much information from the right ho-
nourable member when he should be
able to attend, that they must be the
X

better

better able to determine what fide to take, when a question should come before them for deciding upon the fteps that had been already, and ftill remained to be taken relative to the Westminster election.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer begged leave to explain. He faid that when he took the liberty to remark that the right honourable gentleman, who was abfent, was moft nearly concerned in the bufinefs to which the order then under confideration related, he did not advance it upon his own, but upon the high and grave authority of the right honourable gentleman who made the motion. As to his profeffions relative to a parliamentary reform, he cared not how often they were examined, as he knew that the more they were fifted, the more it would appear that they were fincere. One thing, however, had dropped from the refpectable member who had fpoke laft, which he could not pafs over unnoticed: the honourable member afcribed to him this doctrine, “that reprefentatives are bound to obey the inftructions of their conftituents;" but he affured the honourable gentleman he never laid down fuch a doctrine in that House, or elsewhere; nay, that he condemned and reprobated fuch a principle; and therefore as he would not willingly lie under the imputation of having advanced it, he would never omit an opportunity to difavow it, as often as he fhould hear it imputed to

him.

Mr. Burke began with an allufion to a joke which Mr. Pitt cracked a few days ago at his expence, when he remarked upon his propenfity to make long fpeeches. The right honourable member, faid Mr. Burke, was an enemy to prolixity in every thing but one; he was not an enemy to prolixity in a fcrutiny; though he might think a fpeech of an hour's length in that Houfe very long and tedious, he feemed to take great delight in a fcrutiny that bid fair to laft as long as the parliament. [This raised a loud laugh, which fhewed that Mr. Burke was not much in the minifter's debt.] Turning from this to the bufinefs immediately

before the Houfe, he obferved that the right honourable gentleman seemed to treat with unbecoming levity the account of the accident that had happened to his abfent friend; when two perfons were in a state of hoftility, or, to ufe a milder expreffion, in a ftate of competition or rivalfhip, there was a certain degree of delicacy to be obferved by both towards each other; there was a decorum, that could not be tranfgreffed by either, without difhonour. If two generals, rivals for fame, commanded oppofite armies in time of war, which was the most hoftile kind of competition, and one of them was wounded in an engagement, the other would certainly pass for a man of no elevated mind, who could treat with levity the wounds of his rival. If humanity would not make him drop a tear over his misfortunes, generofity and liberality would not fuffer him to make choice of that particular moment to throw out farcafms against him. And yet it was in fomewhat fimilar circumftances, that the generous and liberal foul of the Chancellor of the Exchequer feemed to feel a pleafure in finding in the accident that had befallen the right honourable gentleman a handle for farcaftically charging his right honourable friend with being the caufe of the delay: he would leave him in full poffeffion of fuch a pleasure, in the enjoyment of which, he would venture to fay, he would not be envied by any man in the Houfe. The right honourable gentleman feemed to doubt that his right honourable friend had really received any injury from what had happened to him; " for my part (faid Mr. Burke) I can affure the Houfe that I faw my right honourable friend; that he leaned upon my arm, and was unable to walk without fupport: but if my affertions do not deferve credit, the furgeon who attends my right honourable friend may be fent for, and he will fatisfy the Houfe, that in confequence of the accident that has happened, my right honourable friend is not able to walk acrofs his room alone."-Mr. Burke then declared that Mr. Fox felt more concern on account of the delay, than

of

of the pain occafioned by this misfortune; and he could fay for one, that nothing could be farther from his own wishes, and he believed he might say the fame for all his friends, than unneceffarily to poftpone the confideration of a bufinefs, which, for the honour of parliament, could not be too fpeedily brought to a conclufion.

Here the order for the attendance of the high-bailiff, &c. was read; and the question being put on Mr. Ellis's motion for discharging it, it was carried without oppofition. Another was then made by the fame gentleman, for the attendance of the high-bailiff, and of Meffrs. Hargrave and Murphy, on the following Tuesday.

NEWFOUNDLAND TRADE.

Mr. Eden rofe immediately after the bufinefs had been thus difpofed of, and faid he would take the opportunity of a full Houfe, which he then faw, to give notice, that he would on the Wednesday following move to difcharge the order made a few days before, for giving the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and fome other members, leave to bring in a bill relative to the United States of America and Newfoundland; and he faid he would do this for the purpose of making way for another order for bringing in the bill upon a more extenfive plan; and in moving for that order, he would take the liberty of throwing out his ideas relative to the law as it now ftands, refpecting the intercourfe be tween America and Newfoundland, which differed very widely from what he had heard afferted a few days ago, by two very great authorities, he did not know which was the greateft (meaning Mr. Pitt and Mr. Jenkinfon.) Mr. Jenkinfon faid, that what he took the liberty to advance a few days ago, relative to the trade of the colonies, had been mifunderstood, or mifreprefented. What he faid, or wifhed to have faid, was this; that there was not now any law, that there never had been any law in this country, that prevented fhips coming from the British Colonies to trade in any part of the globe, the Eat-Indies only excepted; the Eaft-India Company hav

ing by charter the exclufive right of trading to the latter. The right honourable gentleman faid he would move on Wednesday next for the discharge of the order for bringing in the bill; but he would affure him that his motion would then come too late, as the bill would be brought in on Monday; and indeed every one who knew the neceffity for paffing that or fome fuch bill, muft with it to be carried through both Houfes with all poffible expedition: if, therefore, the right honourable member wanted to take the sense of the Houfe on the discharge of the order, he had better make his motion for that purpofe on Monday.

Mr. Baring faid a few words; but we could not hear diftinctly what he faid, from the buz that was in the Houfe: we could only collect, that he expreffed a hope that if the order fhould be discharged, it would be only for the purpose of extending the object of the bill.

Mr. Eden rofe juft to obferve, that not being wedded to a day, he would not perfift in his intention to make his motion on Wednesday; and as Monday appeared to the right honourable gentleman who fpoke laft but one to be the more proper of the two, he would on the latter move for the difcharge of the order.

GLASGOW PETITION.

Mr. Dempfter informed the House, that he had in his hand a petition from the weavers of Glafgow, employed in the manufacture of muflins, &c. complaining of the ruinous confequences that the tax upon muflins and painted linens would bring upon their trade, unless the legislature fhould interpose, and repeal it. This petition, he obferved, was figned by twelve thousand perfons, every one of whom he verily believed was really concerned in the bufinefs of weaving. He then moved for leave to bring it up.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer requested the honourable member would read it, that the Houfe might be tho roughly apprized of its contents, before the queftion on the motion for bringing it up fhould be put, Mr. Dempiter accordingly read it; X 2

and

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