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Wight, copartners and fhipbuilders.-Johnfon Weft, of Market-Place, within the liberty of Weftminster, cooper.-David Scott, late of Antigua, in the Weft-Indies, but how of CharingCrofs, Middlefex, merchant.-William Littlefear, of Green-street, Leicester-fields, filverfmith.-Fairfax Bedlington, of Paradise-street, Rotherhithe, mariner. Thomas Knott, of King-street, Covent-Garden, haberdasher.Feb. 1. Joshua James, of Bristol, diftiller.Pe. ter Kennion, of Liverpool, cooper. -George Swann, of Sheffield, in Yorkshire, butcher.Simon Solomon, of Little Bell-Alley, London, artificial flower-maker and ribbon-painter.Robert Heard, late of Biddeford, in Devonshire, and now of Thames-ftreet, London, mariner.George Stupart, of St. Botolph, Aldgate, mari-Robert Bew, of High-Holbourn, St. Giles's in the Fields, cornchandler.Jofeph Prior, late of Cheapfide, London, haberdasher. -Lazarus Barnett, formerly of Crofby-fquare, Bishopfgate-street, London, late of Philadelphia, in North-America, but now of Somerfet-ftreet, Whitechapel, merchant.-5. Samuel Kimberley, late of Tipton-Green, in Staffordshire, but now a prifoner in the gaol of Stafford, nailor. -John Aaron Pedro, of St. Thomas the Apoitle, in Devonshire, innholder.John Johnfon, of Lombard-ftreet, London, merchant and infurer. Richard Weft, of Newgate-itreet, London, wine and brandy merchant.-George Gun Munro, of Princes-ftreet, London, infurance-broker.Andrew Poupard, formerly of Queen-ftreet, Tower-hill, pawnbroker, but late of Ware, in Herts, flopfeller.Henry Als and John Als, of Gracechurch-ftreet, London, linendrapers and partners. Robert Edmeades, of Fish-street-hill, London, feedfman.John Tackle, of Aldermanbury, London, innholder and ftablekeeper.8. Jonathan Newton, of Afhborne, in Derbyshire, fhopkeeper.Robert Kennett, of New-Bond-ftreet, St. George, Hanover-fquare, upholder.Henry Houghton, formerly of Fleet-ftreet, London, and late of Peckham-Rye-Common, in Surrey, dealer. 12. William Afhton, of Liverpool, ale-brewer (furviving partner of Thomas Holland, late of Liverpool, ale-brewer, deceased).-George Donadieu, of Charles-ftreet, St. Anne, Soho, perfumer. Walter Taylor, of Lower Eaft-Smithfield, St. Botolph, Aldgate, failmaker.- -15. Edward Whitefide, late of Iancaster, merchant and cornfactor. -Humphrey Sydenham, of Witney, in Oxfordshire, draper.Alexander Forbes, of Wood-street, London, innkeeper. Thomas Whitehead, of Clerkenwell-Clofe, St. James, Clerkenwell, tailor.John Morley, of Trowbridge, in Wilts, draper and falefman.Samuel Carne, late of Charles-town, SouthCarolina, but now of Danbury, in Effex, merchant.19. Samuel Sealy, of Yeovill, in Somersetshire, glove-manufacturer.-John Baptift Thevenot, Elifabeth Thornton, and John -Louis L'Evefque, of Albemarle-street, Piccadilly, milleners and copartners. -Nicholas Ridgeway, of Stoke-Newington, Middlefex, ftock-broker. John Hardcastle, of Derby, grocer and flax-dreffer.-William Spaldin, late of Liverpool, filversmith.-Henry Ladd, of Dover, in Kent, thipbuilder.-Jofeph Vernon, of Pop

ham-lane, in North-Waltham, in Hants, innholder.Thomas Watfon, of Bedford-street, St. Paul, Covent-Garden, hofier.--William Payne, of Walton, in Effex, mealman.-22. John Vindin, of Newton St. Loe, in Somersetfhire, mealman and cornfactor.-Robert Rowley, late of Hallow, in Worcestershire, hopmerchant.-Benjamin Paffon, of Debenham, in Suffolk, fhopkeeper.- George Daniel, late of Killgerran, otherwife Kilgarren, in Pembrokefhire, ironmafter.. William Blew, late of Bromyard, in Herefordshire, butcher.-26. Thomas Carter, late of Grove-ftreet, Hackney, in Middlefex, brandy-merchant.-Charles Woodhead, of Stockwell, in Surrey, dyer.-Richard Jolleff, now or late of Bristol, butcher.-Thomas Wigan the younger, of Bristol, banker, goldfmith, and filverfmith. -William Taylor, of Southampton, hopkeeper.-John Pinfent, of Plymouth, foapboiler.-Joseph Owen, of Lindev, in Huddersfield, in Yorkshire, merchant. John Faffey, of Walthamstow, in Effex, mer chant.- -March 1. Robert Arnold, now or late of Bristol, innholder.- -Richard Tyler, of Little Bartholomew-Clofe, London, carpenter and joiner. Benjamin Prince, late of Leeds, in Yorkshire, wine-merchant. - William Fisher, of Bath Eafton, in Somerfetfhire, carrier.Jofeph Graham, now or late of Lancaster, broker and grocer.-5. Thomas Natterefs, of Holbourn, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holbourn, money-fcrivener.-John Lee, late of Fleet-street, but now of Bread-itreet, London, haberdasher. 8. James Hopwood, late of Market-Weighton, in Yorkshire, and now a prifoner in the caftle of York, dealer.-John Halehurst, of Maccles field, in Chefhire, innholder.-John Hall and William Green, of Southwark, cheesemongers and copartners.- -Henry Nethercoate, of EaftGreenwich, in Kent, maltfter.—Samuel Harrington, of Turnmill-ftreet, Clerkenwell, pawnbroker.-John Lonfdale, of Sunderland near the Sea, in the county of Durham, mercer and draper.-12. John Perrey, of Deptford, in Kent, foapmaker.- -Roger Baron, now or late of Cabbin-End, within Ofwaldtwifle, in Lancafhire, cotton-manufacturer.-- Richard Bower and George Langton, both of Liverpool, grocers and copartners.-William Roads, of St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondfey, Surrey, cooper.--Robert Patrick, of Whitechapel, bellfounder.-————— William Fofs, of Kingston-upon-Hull, hatter.— William Stidolph, of Chafford-Mill, in Penhurt, in Kent, paper-maker.-William Agate, late of Rudwich, in Suffex, fhopkeeper.-John Poidivine, now or late of South-Moulton-ftreet, St. George, Hanover-fquare, milliner.——15, Richard Watkinfon, late of Liverpool, linendraper and fhopkeeper.George Heflop, the younger, of Dalton, in Yorkshire, merchant.John Dawfon, of York, linen-draper.Scales, of Lambrigg, in Kirkby Kendal, in Weftmorland, dealer. James Peppercorne, of Welt-Ham, Effex, factor.-19. Robert Jollins, of Norwich, timber-merchant and carpenter. Thomas Brown, of Hoxton, in Middlefex, broker.-22. William Paytoe Cowles, of Kinton, in Herefordshire, dealer.-Peter Beeckman, of Bristol, lemon and orange-merchant.

-Miles

Days

Bank Stock.

3 per C 3 per C. reduced confols.

Holiday

PRICES of STOCKS, &c. in APRIL, 1785.

Compiled by C. DOMVILLE, Stock-Broker, No. 95, Cornhill. 4 per C. | 5 per C. | Long Short India India India S. Seal Old New

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THE

LONDON MAGAZINE,

ENLARGED AND IMPROVED,
FORM A Y,
MAY, 1785.

THE HISTORY OF THE SECOND SESSION OF THE SIXTEENTH PARLIAMENT OF GREAT-BRITAIN.

MR.

tion.

Begun and holden at Westminster, on the 25th of January, 1785.

R. Murphy appearing at the bar,
underwent a further examina-

Lord Beauchamp then asked whether he did not think, from his experience in the fcrutiny, that the most efficacious plan of doing justice to all parties, was by an appeal to a committee of that Houfe, as conftituted under Mr. Grenville's bill?

Lord Mulgrave rofe, and spoke to

order.

Lord Beauchamp replied, and in a fhort but animated fpeech, juftified the propriety of his queftion; and pretty roundly cenfured the conduct of any affembly that should rafhly juftify the prefent fcrutinizing fyftem, fo fatal to the franchises of the electors of a free country!

Lord North faid, the right honourable gentleman (Mr. Pitt) expreffed a folemn indignation against eloquent invectives: upon this fpecies of argument from that honourable gentleman, he left the House to judge. A reproach for eloquent invectives, came with a peculiar grace from him: for his part, he thought he might object to invectives, and to eloquent invectives with much more confiftency: as to the question of his noble friend, he thought it the moft natural of all queftions, and for the best reafon; becaufe it was at the tip of his own tongue a hundred times. The queftion was not to know Mr. Murphy's opinion upon the legality of the fcrutiny, but to know from him (the tenour of whofe LOND. MAG. May 1785.

definition tended to recommend the conduct of the committees of the House of Commons, as the model of propriety) whether he did not think the most efficacious mode of determining the rights of the electors of the city of Westminster, was the tribunal of a committee of the House of Commons, or a fcrutiny, whofe powers of rendering juftice to those who fought it, could be governed by no better example than the proceedings of those committees.

Mr. Fox rofe to exprefs his joy, that the noble lord had taken fire at the fuppofition that Mr. Murphy should be called upon to give an opinion upon the act of the Houfe of Commons. Formerly, indeed, that House had delegated to the high-bailiff an authority which they alone were competent to exercife, and had fuffered him to fit in judgement upon the merits of this election, of which they alone were the fit, and conftitutional judges. But he augured well from the complexion, which appeared in fome members of that Houfe, and from the warmth of the right honourable gentleman over against him, who feemed alfo to take fire at an intimation, that an individual should be called upon to cenfure the refolutions of that House; but what could he think, when not only an individual, but a minifter, had been in the habits of arraigning those refolutions for months and months together at the clofe of the laft parlia ment! Much fault had been found

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with interlocutory debates; but he begged to remind the Houfe that all the objections, and all the interlocutodebates had arifen from thofe who were fitting to the right and left of that right honourable gentleman. The Chancellor of the Exchequer had promised too, that when the proper time fhould come, he would debate the question boldly and fairly, and that he wifhed it to meet with a full and ample difcuffion. When that day fhould come, he deprecated the farcaftic anfwer which had been given to a very long speech that he had made on a former occafion; an answer, that he well remembered was principally directed to its length, without taking the fmalleft notice of its contents. He was glad that the bare mention of his noble friend's queftion had produced a fense of shame, and femblance of feeling, where it ought to produce thofe feelings. Every man in the kingdom, who fpoke upon the fubject of the fcrutiny out of doors, delivered the fame opinion: indeed, but one fentiment was entertained throughout the country. When the hour of difcuffion fhall come, he hoped to fee the right honourable gentleman engage in it without prejudice, or partiality, or malignity; his whole conduct towards him, confidered in every view, affured him that the right honourable gentleman would conduct himfelf with decency, with dignity, and undifgraced by any thing mean, invidious, or per

fonal.

Mr. Pitt fpoke a few words in reply, only obferving, that he was afhamed he had not put a stop to the irregularity of the fyftem of examination that had been permitted; but adding, that he fhould referve what he had to offer on the general queftion until evidence.had been got through.

Mr. Murphy being again called in,

underwent a further examination on fimilar points as before by Mr. Francis and Mr. Sheridan; the laft gentleman, as the final queftion, afking him, what mode he thought beft calculated, in the prefent fituation of the fcrutiny, to do ftrict, and practicable justice to all the contending candi

dates?" To which he anfwered, " An immediate appeal to a committee of the Houfe of Commons!"

Mr. Pitt faid, that no provocations which the right honourable gentleman could throw out, could induce him to deviate from his refolution of not entering now into any difcuffion of the general question: whatever might be justly imputed to him; whatever of rafhnefs, whatever of prefumption, he could not be charged with any backwardness to enter the lifts with the right honourable gentleman.-Whenever the queftion fhould be regularly difcuffed, he wifhed to have it dif cuffed in the fulleft manner, and he would not complain of the length of the right honourable gentleman's fpeech; he would not utter any farcafms, unless he fhould think proper to introduce, according to his conftant cuftom, topics totally irrelative to the point in debate; and as a proof that he wifhed not to defer meeting him on this ground, he would move that the further hearing be deferred till twelve o'clock this day; which being agreed to, the Houfe rofe at three o'clock this morning.

Wednesday, February 9. WESTMINSTER ELECTION. Mr. Welbore Ellis rofe and remarked, that having firft taken up the important bufinefs which was now under the confideration of the Houfe, he thought it incumbent on him to explain the purpose for which his original motion was intended; and the motives on which the motion he now . intended to fubmit to them was founded. He then proceeded in an accurate and circumstantial narrative, to relate the progrefs of the Westminster scrutiny; and with the moft pertinent comments went through the leading points of the depofitions given by the high-bailiff and his affeffors at the bar of the Houfe. He dwelt with confiderable effect on the circumftance of the high-bailiff, confidering himself to act under the authority of the Houfe, which being removed, he could have no other to proceed under. On the face of this fingle declaration, there appeared fufficient proof of the ille

gality of the fyftem in general, and the abfurdity and manifeft impropriety of that fanction under which he was authorifed to continue fo execrated a conduct. If he confeffed, that by removing the authority of parliament, he had now no other to proceed upon; need there any arguments to prove, that appointing a time for the fcrutiny, in the very day when the term of his writ expired, was an act beyond the extent of authority, as being beyond the date of his precept. In granting the request of a fcrutiny, according to the doctrines generally held now, he was perhaps juftifiable, as his power did not expire till the expiration of the date of his precept; but in appointing the proceedings of the fcrutiny for a time long after the date of his precept, was overleaping not only the powers granted to a returning officer, but exceeding any power our conftitution will fuffer to be vefted in any individual; it was the doctrine as well of the ftatutes as of the common law of this country, as well as the intention manifeft, prima facie, on the writ itfelf, that the parliament fhall not only meet on a certain day, but fhall alfe be full, which after gave rife to the arreft and punishment of members who neglected the duty of attendance; and the forms of election were particularly adapted with a view to this grand object. Was the city of Weftminster alone then to be the melancholy exemption? Was it referved for that city to experience the delay of a fcrutiny, which not only extended beyond the time appointed for the meeting of parliament, but was, according to the beft evidence given on the occafion, likely to continue for two years to come? If this was like any thing in the fpirit of the British conftitution, or any thing like the ufual courfe of elections, he knew nothing to which it would not affimilate. In the ancient meetings of parliament, when the feffion lafted generally no more than fix weeks, how would fuch a measure as this be treated? and would it not effectually deftroy every purpofe of reprefentation? Shall then those principles, that fpirit, and that confti

tution tranfmitted to us from the most diftant period of our hiftory, be now deftroyed without even the pretext of 'a ftatute to give it fanction! From the defcription given by the high-bailiff himself of the imbecility of his court, what could be more vain, impotent, and inadequate? He did not expect till within these two days that there was any perfon in the Houfe who could have any other opinion of it. He expected, that fenfible of having done wrong, they would chearfully fet about correcting their mifconduct, and not by an obftinate perfeverance continue thofe abuses, of which there were fuch loud and fuch general complaints. There was fcarce a man out of the Houfe who did not condemn and reprobate the measure: for were the high-bailiff to proceed upon this fcrutiny till it was entirely concluded, was he not yet liable to the fame errors as on taking the poll? having no authority to enforce the attendance of witneffes, or punish fuch as are detected in prevarication or falfehood. Nothing made him fo fincere a convert to Mr. Grenville's bill, as the abfurdities of this prepofterous measure, from which any other alternative must be agreeable and advantageous. Of this the teftimony of one of the perfons principally concerned (Mr. Murphy) in the conduct of the fcrutiny, was fufficient confirmation; for he thought that notwithstanding the plans offered for expediting the bufinefs, the best mode, in which the fubject could be decided, was by a committee of the Houfe of Commons. Confidering then the illegality as well as the impolicy of the fcrutiny, the impracticability of bringing the bufinefs to a final fue, in any moderate time, the heavy expence with which it was attended to the parties, the juft and fevere complaints of an injured city, and according fentiments of the nation at large, added to the infufficiency of the miferable court to which it was referred, he would conclude by moving, "That the high-bailiff of the city of Weftminster, by virtue of a precept directed to him by the sheriff of Middlefex for electing two ci

tizens

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