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LIPPINCOTT'S

EDUCATIONAL SERIES

EDITED BY

MARTIN G. BRUMBAUGH, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D.

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, PHILADELPHIA

VOLUME XII

EDITED BY DR. M. G. BRUMBAUGH Superintendent of Schools

Philadelphia

VOLUME I
Thinking and Learning to Think

By NATHAN C. SCHAEFFER, Ph.D., LL.D.,
Superintendent of Public Instruction for the

State of Pennsylvania. 351 pages. Cloth, $1.25.
VOLUME II
Two Centuries of Pennsylvania History

By ISAAC SHARPLESS, President of Haverford

College. 385 pages. Illustrated. Cloth, $1.25. VOLUME III History of Education

By E. L. KEMP, A.M., Principal of State Nor. mal School, East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.

385 pages. Cloth, $1.25. VOLUME IV Kant's Educational Theory

By EDWARD FRANKLIN BUCKNER, Ph.D., Pro fessor of Philosophy and Education in the Uni

versity of Alabama. 309 pages. Cloth, $1.25. VOLUME V The Recitation

By SAMUEL HAMILTON, Ph.D., Superintendent of Public Schools, Allegheny County, Pennsyl

vania. 369 pages. Cloth, $1.25.
VOLUME V!
The Educational Process

By ARTHUR CARY FLESHMAN, A.M., of State
Normal School, Slippery Rock, Pa. 336 pages.

Cloth, $1.25.
VOLUME VII
The Study of Nature

By SAMUEL CHRISTIAN SCHMUCKER, Ph.D.,
Professor of Biological Sciences in the West
Chester (Pa.) State Normal School. Four full-
page plates in color and 57 line drawings. 315

pages. Cloth, $1.25.
VOLUME VIII
Annals of Educational Progress
VOLUME IX
Current Educational Activities

By JOHN P. GARBER, Ph.D., Associate Sup-
erintendent of Schools, Philadelphia. Cloth,

$1.25 per volume. VOLUME X The Conservation of the Child

By DR. ARTHUR HOLMES, Dean of State Col. lege, State College, Pa. 320 pages. 16 illus. trations. Cloth, $1.25.

AN IMPORTANT NEW BOOK FOR TEACHERS
Modern Methods for Teachers

By CHARLES C. Boyer, Ph.D., Professor of
Pedagogics, Keystone State Normal School
Kutzłown, Pa. 345 pages. Cloth, $1.50.

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BEING THE THIRD VOLUME OF
“THE ANNALS OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS”

BY

JOHN PALMER GARBER, PH.D.
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF PHILADELPHIA

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EDITOR'S PREFACE.

Few realize the significant changes that have occurred in the aim and spirit of the school within the past ten years. In educational affairs the lapse of a decade now marks a new era. So rapid is the general progress of mankind that this is also true of industrial, political, and social life. But the developments in education have this distinctive feature, they are less restricted by the stress of actual conditions than are other forms of human activity. Even under the pressure of modern competition the school finds it both possible and desirable to do something more than fit its pupils for a definite career. This is the answer to those who would insist that schooling need be little more than an apprenticeship for the shop or the counting-house. Nowhere is the world's need limited alone to trained workmen, no matter how great their skill. We need happy, contented' workmen as well as skilled workmen. And nowhere shall we rise to the plane of leadership, even in industrial competitions, until we have given to our pupils not only an understanding of specific industrial problems, but also that wider and vastly more significant equipment which enables them to sense the relative value of things about them and easily to find their place in the larger social, civic, and economic environment into which they must enter.

And these larger demands are, after all, more in accord with the spirit of the times. There was a day when knowledge was the only thing demanded of the school. And in a still earlier epoch even this was not deemed the need of all. When the State was everything and everything was for the State, the only training necessary for the masses was that they should learn to obey; and protection was the only right which they could claim in return. But with the growth of wealth among the common people came increase of power and by and by a voice in their own control. With the beginning of constitutional government and the introduction of the ballot, a new order of things was well under way. Now only an intelligent citizenship

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