Proceedings of the Ohio State Forestry Association: At Its Meeting in Columbus, March 28th, 1884, Together with a Report Upon the Forest Condition of Ohio, Illustrated by Charts by the Forestry Division of the United States Department of Agriculture

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G. J. Brand, State printers, 1884 - Počet stran: 65
 

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Strana 35 - When but an idle boy I sought its grateful shade; In all their gushing joy Here, too, my sisters played. My mother kissed me here, My father...
Strana 37 - WHEN we plant a tree, we are doing what we can to make our planet a more wholesome and happier dwelling place for those who come after us if not for ourselves. As you drop the seed, as you plant the sapling; your left hand hardly knows what your right hand is doing. But Nature knows, and in due time the Power that sees and works in secret will reward you openly.
Strana 36 - ... sought its grateful shade; In all their gushing joy Here, too, my sisters played. My mother kissed me here: My father pressed my hand — Forgive this foolish tear, But let that old oak stand! My heart-strings round thee cling, Close as thy bark, old friend! Here shall the wild-bird sing, And still thy branches bend. Old tree! the storm still brave! And, woodman, leave the spot; While I've a hand to save, Thy axe shall harm it not.
Strana 35 - Oh, spare that aged oak, Now towering to the skies ! When but an idle boy I sought its grateful shade ; In all their gushing joy Here too my sisters played.
Strana 34 - Indiana, where Little Turtle, the great Miami Chief, gathered his warriors ; the Elm tree at Cambridge, in the shade of which Washington first took command of the Continental Army on a hot summer's day ; the Tulip tree on King's Mountain battle-field in South Carolina, on which ten bloodthirsty Tories were hung at one time ; the tall Pine tree at Ft.
Strana 37 - Nature finds rhymes for , them in the recurring measures of the seasons. Winter strips them of their ornaments and gives them, as it were, in prose translation, and summer reclothes them in all the splendid phrases of their leafy language. What are these maples and beeches and birches, but odes and idyls and madrigals? What are these pines and firs and spruces but holy hymns, too solemn for the many hued raiment of their gay deciduous neighbors?
Strana 30 - Grove.' Viewed from the summit of the ridge immediately west, the sight was one of the most animating ever brought before the eyes of Cincinnatians. The entire ridge, nearly a third of a mile in length, was occupied by those persons taking part in the first-named ceremonies, while the slope designated was occupied by a dense mass of gayly dressed children in active motion over a surface of about...
Strana 42 - At the annual meeting the board of directors shall report the amount of money received during the year, and the source from which it has been received; the amount of money expended during the year, and the objects for which it has been expended; the number of trees planted at the cost of the society, and the number planted by individuals; and, generally, all acts of the board that may be of interest to the society. This report shall be entered on the record of the society.
Strana 33 - Revolution, the citizens of Boston used to gather to listen to the advocates of our country's freedom ; around it, during the war, they met to offer up thanks and supplications to Almighty God for the success of the patriot armies ; and, after the terrible struggle had ended, the people were wont to assemble from year to year in the shadow of that old tree to celebrate the liberty and independence of our country. It stood there till within a few years, a living monument of the patriotism of the citizens...
Strana 37 - ... doing. But Nature knows, and in due time the Power that sees and works in secret will reward you openly. You have been warned against hiding your talent in a napkin ; but if your talent takes the form of a maple-key or an acorn, and your napkin is a shred of the apron that covers

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