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laughter. The falling circumflex begins with the rising, and ends with the falling movement. This will appear in Hamlet's reply to his mother. · Q. Hamlet, you have your father much offended. H. Madam, you have my father much offended.

These movements of the voice have an important agency in forming the emphasis of scorn and irony.

If you have writ your annals true, 'tis there,
That like an eagle in a dove-cote, I
Flutter'd

your

Volsces in Corioli :
Alone I did it-Boy !

And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, cry aloud; for he is a God: either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is on a journey, or peradventure he sleepetli, and

must be awaked.

Section II. Of Rhythmus. Rhythmus or melodious reading, signifies the uniform recurrence of accented syllables in a given time, called feet. Each foot begins with an accented, and ends with an unaccented syllable or more. But as there is not in the English language this regular alternation of accented and unaccented syllables, pauses are introduced to supply the deficiency. Thus, if in dividing a sentence into feet it should happen, as it often does, that the first word in the bar is unaccented, a rest or pause is introduced, and the remaining measure is filled with unaccented syllables : so that there shall be in each foot, really or artificially, one accented, and one or more unaccented syllables. And as every accented syllable must begin a bar, it often happens that the measure of the preceding foot, for the want of unaccented syllables, must be completed by the introduction of pauses. Thus in the Exile of Erin : 7 There I came to the beach 7 | 7 a poor | éxile of | 'Erin, 1 7 The dew on his thin 7 | robe 717 was heavy and chill 7 7 For his country he sigh’d, 7! whén attwilight repairing, 7 To wander a| lóne 7 |7 by the wind 7 | béaten | hill |

That the ear requires rhythmus in reading poetry, no one will dispute. The regular alternation of heavy and light sound is absolutely indispensable. The most uncultivated speaker, in reciting the following lines of Pope, would be apt to imitate the following reading : 7 The / séas 7 17 shall / waste, 7 1 7 the skies in smoke de

cáy 7

Rocks 7 | fall to | dúst 7 1 7 and mountains mélt a way, 71 7 But fixed his word, 7/7 his sáving | power remains,7 7 Thy | réalm 7 17 for | éver | lásts, 7 17 thy | ówn mes / siah |

reigns. 7 But in reading prose, and less musical poetry, there would be a greater departure from rhythmus. The uncultivated reader in those instances would imagine there is no music. Such, however, is not the fact : for in every species of composition, there is more or less of this attribute ; and reading is good or bad, in proportion to the exhibition of it.

As the benefits of rhythmical reading consist, not merely in the improvement of the ear, the ease of the reader, and the pleasa ure it affords the auditor, but also of useful exercises in accentuation, and the delicate intermixture of light and heavy sound, it should be attended to with great assiduity. The following examples, if completely mastered, will contribute much to the formation of a taste and aptitude for rhythmical reading.

HOHENLINDEN.

7 On Linden - when the sun was | lów, 71
7 All | bloodless l_ láy the un trodden | snów, 7 |
17717 And dárk as winter 7 was the flow 7|
7 0f\'Iscr | rólling / rápidly. 1777
7 But Línden | - | sáw an other sight7|
When the drúm 7 | béat 717 at | déad of night 7
7 Com | mánding | firés of death, 717 to I light|
7 The darkness | 7 of her | scénery. 1777
7 By | torch and I trumpet | | fast ar | ráy'd7|
Each 7 | horseman | drew his battle blade, 71

7 And | fúrious - every charger | neighed 7
7 To ljóin the dreadful | révelry. 1777
Thén 7 | shook the hills 7 | 7 with | thunder | riven,
Then 7 rúshed the steed, 717 to battle driven,
17 And louder 7 than the bólts of heaven,

Fár 7 | fáshed 7 17 the fréd 717 ar s tíllery. I 7 And | rédder lyét 7 1 7 those firés shall I glów 7, 70n | Linden's | hills of blood staind | snów, 7| 7 And | dárker | yét 7 17 shall | bé the flow, 71 70f I'ser | rólling | rápidly. 1777 7 Tis morn;71 47 but scarce 7 bón7 lúrid 1 sún 7 7 Can | piérce the war-clouds / rólling dún ;7|| 7 Where | fúrious Frank 717 and fiéry | Hún 7

Shout 7|7 in their | súlphurous | canopy. 1777 7 The combat | deépens. On 717 ye brave 7 7 Who rúsh to glory | 17 or the gráve : 71 Wave 71 — Múnich |--|4ll thy | bánners / wáve; 7 7 And charge 717 with | áll7 | 7 thy | chivalry. I Few 7 féw shall 'párt 7/7 where many | méet, 7 | 7 The I snów 7 17 shall be their | winding / sheet; 7-1 17 And | every | túrf? 17 be néath their | feét7| 17 Shall) bé a soldier's sépulchre. 1777

THE THUNDER STORM.

BY MONTGOMERY.

O for evening's | brównest shade ; 7 |

Where the bréezes | pláy 717 by | stedlth, 7| 7 In the forest | cinctured | gláde, 7|

Round the hermitage of Health :7| 1

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7 While the noon-bright | mountains 1 bláze, 7| 7 In the sun's tor| ménting | rays:7| 1 O’ér the sick and / súltry | pláins, 71

Through the dím 7 17 de / lírious / air, 7 | 1 A'gonizing 1 silence reigns; 7|| 1

7 And the wánness | 7 of des pair. 7 1 Náture | faints 7 17 with | férventhéat;7| A'h !7 | 7 her púlse 717 has | ceásd to béat. 7! | Nów in ('deep and | dréadful glóom, 7|

Clouds on | clouds 717 por | tentous / spread ; 7 | Black 7 as if the day of doom, 7|

Hung o°er | nature’s | shrinking_head. 7 | ,717 the I lightning | breaks from high;?| 1 Gód is coming, 1 | Gód 717 is | nígh.? | Héar ye not | 7 his / cháriot | whéels, 7 |

7 As the mighty thunder rolls ; 7| Nature, | stártled | nature | reéls, 71

7 From the centre | 7 to the póles. 71 1
Trémble | ocean | earth 7 17 and s'ky, 71
Trémble, | G'od 7 1 7 is 1 pássing | b'y.7 |
Dárkness wild with hórror forms 7
His mystérious híding place ;7|

1 Should he | 7 from his árk of stórms 7|

Rénd the / véil7| 7 and show his | fáce, 7|
7 At the judgment | 7 of his eye7|
A'll the universe | 7 would die. 7| 1
Bríghter | broader | lightnings | flash, 7|

Háil and rain, 7| tempéstuous I fall, 71 i
Louder deeper thunders | crash, 71

Désolation threatens | all. 7 1 1
Struggling nature | gasps for breath,
7 In the agony 7 of death, 7|| 1 1
Gód of vengeance 17 from a bóve, 7

While thine | áwfullbólts are húrld, 7 |

10',717 remémber | thou 7 | 7 art lóve;?

Spáre, 710', / spáre 7| 7 aguilty | world. 7|
Stáy thy | fláming / wráth a / while ; 7|
See thy | bów of | prómise | smíle. 7 | I
Welcome | 7 in the Eastern | cloud 71

Méssenger of mércy | stíll ;7 |
Now | 7 ye | winds 7 17 pro | claím a loud 7 |

Peace on earth, 7 | 7 to 1 mán 7 | good 7 | will, 71 1
Nature, | Gód's re pénting / child, 7|
S'ee thy / párent | réconcil'd. 1 1
Hárk, 71

17 the nightingale 17 a fár, 71
Swéetly / sings the sun to s rést, 7 |
7 And a | wákes the l'evéning | stár,7 |

7 In the rosy | tinted wést; 7
While the moon's enchanting I éye, 7|
Oʻpens | Paradise 17 on high.71
Cléar and tranquil |7 is the night, 7||

Nature's | sore afflictions | céase, 7|
7 And the storm that bént its | might, 7 |

Hás a covenant | 7 of peace. 7| 1 Vengeance drops her hármless ród, 7! Mércy | 7 is the power of | Gód. 71 1

Lord of | áll 7 | power|7 and might, 717 whó art the author and giver | 7 of all 7 good 7 | 7 things, I gráft in our hearts 717 the love of thy | náme, 7 | 7 increase in us ( trúe re | lígion, nourish us with | áll 7 | goodness, 17 and of thy I great7 mércy, I keep us 1 7 in the same, 717 through | Jésus Christ 717 our | Lórd.7!

For the farther discussion of this subject, I refer, with great pleasure, to Dr. J. Barber's Exercises in Rhythmus. As he is now preparing a new edition of this work, with considérable im

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