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And gently on the orphan head

Of innocence descend.

But chiefly spare, o king of clouds!

The sailor on his airy shrouds;

When wrecks and beacons strew the steep,

And spectres walk along the deep.

Milder yet thy snowy breezes

Pour on yonder tented shores,

Where the Rhine's broad billow freezes,

Or the dark-brown Danube roars.

Oh winds of winter! list

ye

there

To many a deep and dying groan;

Or start, ye demons of the midnight air,

At shrieks and thunders louder than your own. Alas! ev’n your unhallow'd breath

May spare the victim, fallen low;

But man will ask no truce to death,

No bounds to human woe 3.

3 This ode was written in Germany, at the close of 1800, before the conclusion of hostilities.

THE SOLDIER'S DREAM.

Our bugles sang truce-for the night-cloud had

low'r'd,

And the centinel stars set their watch in the sky;

And thousands had sunk on the ground overpow'r'd,

The weary to sleep, and the wounded to die.

When reposing that night on my pallet of straw,

By the wolf-scaring faggot that guarded the slain;

At the dead of the night a sweet vision I saw,

And thrice ere the morning I dreamt it again.

Methought from the battle-field's dreadful array,

Far, far I had roam'd on a desolate track:

Twas autumn-and sunshine arose on the way

To the home of my fathers, that welcom'd me back.

I flew to the pleasant fields travers'd so oft

In life's morning march, when my bosom was

young;

I heard my own mountain-goats bleating aloft,

And knew the sweet strain that the corn-reapers

sung

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