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APPENDIX.

A.

T'he Atheist’s Tragedie.

This ballad is printed from a manuscript copy in the possession of Mr. J. P. Collier. The “Friend once gay and greene" is, of course, Robert Greene; Wormall is the anagram of Marlow.

ALL you that have got eares to heare,

Now listen unto mee ;
Whilst I do tell a tale of feare:

A true one it shall bee:

He now is gone to his account,

And gone before his time,
Did not his wicked deedes surmount

All precedent of crime.
But he no warning ever tooke

From others' wofull fate,
And never gave his life a looke

Untill it was to late. He had a friend, once gay and greene,

Who died not long before, The wofull'st wretch was ever seene,

The worst ere woman bore.

A truer storie nere was told,

As some alive can showe; 'Tis of a man in crime grown olde,

Though age he did not know. This man did his owne God denie

And Christ his onlie son, And did all punishment defie,

So he his course might run. Both day and night would he blas

pheme, And day and night would sware, As if his life was but a dreame.

Not ending in dispaire. A poet was he of repute,

And wrote full many a playe, Now strutting in a silken sute,

Then begging by the way.
He had alsoe a player beene

Upon the Curtaine-stage,
But brake his leg in one lewd scene,

When in his early age.
He was a fellow to all those

That did God's laws reject,
Consorting with the Christians' foes

And men of ill aspect.
Ruffians and cutpurses hee

Had ever at his backe,
And led a life most foule and free,

To his eternall wracke.

Unlesse this WORMALL did exceede

Even him in wickednesse,
Who died in the extreemest neede

And terror's bitternesse.
Yet Wormall ever kept his course,

Since nought could him dismay ; He knew not what thing was remorse

Unto his dying day.
Then had he no time to repent

The crimes he did commit,
And no man ever did lament

For him, to dye unfitt.
Ah, how is knowledge wasted quite

On such want wisedome true,
And that which should be guiding light

leades to errors newe!

Well might learned Cambridge oft re

gret
He ever there was bred :
The tree she in his minde had set
Brought poison forth instead.

B B

His lust was lawlesse as his life,

And brought about his death; For, in a deadlie mortall strife,

Striving to stop the breath
Of one who was his rivall foe,

With his owne dagger slaine,
He groaned, and word spoke neve

moe,
Pierc'd through the eye and braine.
Thus did he come to suddaine ende

That was a foe to all,
And least unto himselfe a friend,

And raging passion's thrall.
Had he been brought up to the trade

His father follow'd still,
This exit he had never made,

Nor playde a part soe ill.

Take warning ye that playes doe make,

And ye that doe them act;
Desist in time for Wormall's sake,

And thinke upon his fact.
Blaspheming Tambolin must die,

And Faustus meete his ende;
Repent, repent, or presentlie

To hell ye must discend.
What is there, in this world, of worth

That we should prize it soe?
Life is but trouble from our birth,

The wise do say and know.
Our lives, then, let us mend with speed,

Or we shall suerly rue
The end of everie hainous deedk's
In life that shall insue.

Finis. Ign.

B.

A Note,

Contayninge the Opinion of one Christofer Marlye, concernynge his damnable Opinions and Judgment of Relygion and Scorne

of God's Worde.

FROM MS. HARL. 6853, FOL. 320.

This paper was first printed by Ritson in his Observations on Warton's Hist. of E. P., p. 40.

In a volume, now in the Bodleian Library, Malone has written as follows:

“ This Richard Bame or Banes was hanged at Tyburn on the 6th of Dec. 1594. See the Stationers' Register, Book B, p. 316..

“It is obvious to remark upon this testimony, that it is not upon oath; that it contains some declarations which it is utterly incredible that Marlowe should have made (as that concerning his intention to coin, which he must have known to be penal); that Bane does not appear to have been confronted with the person accused, or cross-examined by him or any other person; and that the whole rests upon his single assertion. This paper, however, may derive some support from the verses quoted at the other side [of the page in Malone's book) from The Returne from Parnassus, which was written about 10 years after Marlowe's death."

That the Indians and many Authors of Antiquitei have assuredly written of aboue 16 thowsande years agone, wher Adam is proved to have leyved within 6 thowsande yeers.

He afirmeth That Moyses was but

a Juggler, and that one Heriots can do more than hee.

That Moyses made the Jewes to travell fortie yeers in the wildernes (which iorny might have ben don in lesse then one yeer) er they came to the promised

lande, to the intente that those whoe wer privei to most of his subtileteis might perish, and so an everlastinge supersticion remayne in the hartes of the people,

That the firste beginnynge of Religion was only to keep men in awe.

That it was an easye matter for Moyses, beinge brought vp in all the artes of the Egiptians, to abyse the Jewes, beinge a rvde and gross people.

the Queen of Englande, and that he was acquainted with one Poole, a prisoner in newgate, whoe hath great skill in mixture of mettalls, and, havinge learned some thinges of him, he ment, thorough help of a cunnynge stampemaker, to coyne french crownes, pistolettes, and englishe shillinges.

That, yf Christ had instituted the Sacramentes with more ceremonyall reverence, it wold have ben had in more admiracion, that it wolde have ben much better beinge administred in a Tobacco pype. .

That he (Christ) was the sonne of a carpenter, and that yf the Jewes amonge whome he was borne did crvcifye him, thei best knew him and whence he came.

That Christ deserved better to dye then Barabas, and that the Jewes made a good choyce, though Barrabas were both a thiefe and a murtherer.

That yf ther be any God or good Religion, then it is in the Papistes, becavse the service of God is performed with more ceremonyes, as elevacion of the masse, organs, singinge men, shaven crownes, &c. That all protestantes ar hipocriticall Asses.

That, yf he wer put to write a new religion, he wolde vndertake both a more excellent and inore admirable methode, and that all the new testament is filthely written.

That one Richard Cholmelei hath confessed that he was perswaded by Marloes reason to become an Athieste.

Theis thinges, with many other, shall by good and honest men be proved to be his opinions and common speeches, and that this Marloe doth not only holde them himself, but almost in every company he commeth, perswadeth men to Athiesme, willinge them not to be afrayed of bugbeares and hobgoblins, and utterly scornynge both God and his ministers, as I Richard Bome [sic] will justify both by my othe and the testimony of many honest men, and almost all men with whome he hath conversed any tyme will testefy the same : and, as I thincke, all men in christianitei ought to endevor that the mouth of so dangerous a member may be stopped.

He sayeth moreover that he hath coated [quoted] a number of contrarieties out of the scriptures, which he hath geeven to some great men, whoe in convenient tyme shal be named. When theis thinges shalbe called in question, the witnesses shall be produced.

RYCHARD BAME. (Endorsed) Copye of Marloes blasphemyes

as sent to her Highness]e.

That all the Appostels wer fishermen and base fellowes, nether of witt nor worth, that Pawle only had witt, that he was a timerous fellow in biddinge men to be subiect to magistrates against his conscience.

That he had as good right to coyne as

INDEX TO THE NOTES.

315

ABOVE for about), 200 b. 346

Aby thy conquest past, 281 b. 366
Actors, best of, 87 323
Adolesche, 221 b. 352
Ædone, 215 a. 351
Affect, 186 a. 341
Agood, 99 6. 325
Air (for hair), 173 a. 338
Albertos Magnus, 61 a. 320
Alcmane (Alcmæon), 217 a. 353
Alone (adjective), 243 6. 359
Anademe, 216 b. 351
And actions (or audacious), 207 6. 348
Antwerp Bridge, 60 b. 320
Arachne, 2426, 358
Argins, 41 6. 316.43 a. 316
Argumentum testimonii, 161 a. 335
Arms (to give), 46 a. 317
Art (? heart), 76 b. 322,
As you like it," 198 6. 346

Cato whom fools reverence, 283 a: 367
Catzerie, 110 6. 327
Cavalieros, 39 b. 316
Censures, 86. 323
Censured, 198 6. 345
Champion, 8 a. 312 31 a. 315 41 0. 316
Channel (bone), 34

b.
Channel (kennel), 120 b. 329 142 a. 332

149 a. 333
Cherup through the bills, 197 a. 344
Che sera, sera, 60 a. 319
Chide, 225 a. 353
Chides, evocat, 233 6. 356
Chreste, 215 a. 351
Cleapt (embra 225 a. 353
Cleyes claws), 286 6. 367
Clips (mistranslation), 230 6. 355
Cloak (altered from looks), 251 a, 361
Clouts, 9 b. 312
Cock-horse peasantry, 225 &. 353
Coil, 186 6. 341
Coll (or coil), 188 6. 341
Collier's son, 161 a. 335
Comely tall was she, 253 a. 362
Conceived by Mars, 174 6. 338
Consort of Music, 21 b, 314
Consummate, 36 b. 315
Convertite, 916. 324,
Corps du gard, 234 6. 356
Corps' small grave, 244 a. 359
Counterfeit, 212, 350
Counterscarp, 41 b. 316
Counting-house, 88 a. 323
Country gods, 246 a. 360
Country wealth, 261 6. 364
Covered-ways, 416. 316 43 a. 316
Coyness and pure deceits, 215 a. 358
Crooked line, 280 b. 366
Cross-biting, 110 b. 327
Crown, smooth way's, 249 a. 361
Crucifying children, 106 a. 326
Crystal, mathematic, 208 a. 348
Cullion, 1276. 330
Custom, 89 a. 324
Cypres (crape) 210 a. 350

BANDY, ?20 a. 329

Barbarian steeds, 33 a. 315
Basilisks, 18 a. 314
Basse, William, 264 a. 364
Bassoes, 12 b. 312
Bastones, 15 a. 313
Bating (? baiting), 226 a. 353
Batten, 104 b. 326
Behight, promisit, 253a, 361
B. J. (Ben Jonson), 238 6. 357
Being present, 244 6. 359
Bets, 87, 323
Bird-bolt's shoot, 225 a. 353
Border (limit), 236 a. 357
Boss, 166. 313
Brandished fire, 228 6. 354
Brave, 5 a. 311
Brave ! 99 a. 325
Broth by the Eye, 104 6. 326
Bugs, 46 6. 317
Burgonets, 158 6. 334
Burst, 53 a. 318
Bussorah, 42 b. 316

CANONIZE, 61 a. 320

Carbonades, 21 6.314
Carcanet, 207 6. 348
Carouse the sea, 245

b.

359
Cassandra, 232 a.3 55
Cast, 115 á. 328 147 6. 332 150 6. 333

DACUS (Samuel Daniel), 267 b. 365 290 m

366
Danged down, 206 6. 248 348
Dapsilis, 215 a. 351
Dead sea, 132 6. 331
Deaf doors, 257 6. 363
Death (for Deaths) 45 6. 317

French rout, 247 a. 360
Frogs (blood of), 257 a. 363
Frost-drad myrtle, 239 6. 358
Fury (for Troy), 1836. 340

Defend (prohibit), 155 a. 335
Defiled the day, 285 6. 367
Descant face, 223 a. 353
Devotes, 2234. 353
Diameter, 204 a. 347
Dichotomist, 160 b. 335
Digested hair, 237 b. 357
Dipsas (Thirsty one),

233 a. 356
Dis (Pluto), 206 6. 348
Discoloured, 198, a. 345
Discontent, 202 6. 346
Disparent, 208 a. 348 220 6. 352
Distained, 232 a. 355
Division (to run), 110 b. 327
Dryden, 250 6. 361
Dusty honours, 238 a. 357

GABIONS, 436. 317

Gallop amain, 198 a. 34
Garboils, 278 b. 366
Gear, membra, 231 6. 355
Get a deity, 60 a. 319
Glorious, 19 a. 314
Glose, 201 a. 346
Gobbets (not goblets), 230 a. 355
Godly birds, 243 a. 359
Golden cross, 100 b. 325
Grate (private box), 263 6. 364
Graven (buried), 207 a. 348
Guelder dame, 238 a. 357

ECSTASY, 93 a. 324

Ecus (crowns), 147 a. 334
Electra, 260 6. 364.
Elizabeth Woodville, 203 a. 347
Emperious, 165 6. 336
Enforcèd, 215 8. 351 2186. 352
Enginous despair, 210 a. 250
Enthrilled his heart, 218 6. 352
Entrance, 159 a. 334
Envied, 120 bx 329 176 a, 339
Envious garment, 252 a.b. 361
Epicedians, 2156. 351
Eronusis, 216 a. 351
Euphrates, 28 a. 314,
Europa (for Eurotas), 235 a. 356
'Every Man in his Humour,' 1994. 346
Exhibition, 167 a. 337
Expugnèd, 209 a. 348
Eyas thoughts, 213 6. 351

HADI wist,' 135 a. 331

Halycon, 88 6. 324
Hale, 179 a. 339
Hannibal, 194 6. 343
Harness, 66 a. 321 179 6. 339
Harry Hunkes, 269 6. 365
Hate (for Fate), 1170. 328
Haught, 136 a. 331
Helen of Troy, 81 a. 322
Her own request, 253 6. 362
Her (for Their), 191 a. 342
Hermosa placer, &c., 96 a. 325
Heywood, 86 323 267 a., 365
Himself (for Myself), 2676. 365
Horse courser, 78 a. 322
Hoves (hoofs). 204 a. 347
Hugy, 15 6. 313 31 a. 314.

225 a.

FACT, 2406. 358

Factious, 167 a. 337
Fair, 7 a. 311
False, 8 a. 312 456. 317
Farewell, 192 b. 342
Fat love, 250 a. 361
Favour (countenance), 215 6. 351

353
Fear not, 31 a. 315
Fearful Rome, 28.) a. 366
Fet (fetched), 1856. 341 205 6. 348
Fellows (for follow us), 184 5. 343
Females' miss, 49 a. 317
Fire, 64 6. 320
Fisherman, 213

a. 351
Flaw, 232 6. 356
Fleet, 54 6. 318 123a. 330 190 a. 342
Foil, 17 a. 313 38 a. 316
Follow us (for fellows), 1846. 341
Followers (successors), 426. 316
Fond, fondly, 93 b. 324' 146 a. 332 256 a.

362
For being (not to be), 486.317
Foul and favourless, 182 a. 340
Free-born, 236 a. 357

IBERIAN City (Cadiz), 209 a, 34

Ida did sing with corn, 259 6. 363
'I know not what,' 254 a. 362.
Imbast, 256 6. 362.
Imperance, 211,6 350.
In for On), 10 b. 312
Inachus, 255a. 362
Incensed, 165 a. 336
Incony, 112 a. 328
Inhabited, 15 a. 313
Injury (verb), 36. 310
Intire (inside), 209 a. 348
Invention, 36. 310
Ivory bowers, 38 a. 316

JACOBS Staff, 436. 316

Jaded King of Pontus, 328 b. 369
Jaws (for Paws), 45 a. 317
Jesses, 129 6. 330
Jet, 127 b. 330
Jig, 131 b. 23

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