History of England, Svazek 2

Přední strana obálky
 

Co říkají ostatní - Napsat recenzi

Na obvyklých místech jsme nenalezli žádné recenze.

Vybrané stránky

Další vydání - Zobrazit všechny

Běžně se vyskytující výrazy a sousloví

Oblíbené pasáže

Strana 395 - ... privily and secretly, without edition of banns, in a private chamber, a profane place, and not openly in the face of the church after the law of God's church, but contrary thereunto, and the laudable custom of the church of England...
Strana 270 - It is scarcely possible to imagine any thing more frivolous than the series of articles which were exhibited against the luckless premier. In the first of these, he is charged with " having intended to marry his son John to Margaret Beaufort, the heiress of the late John duke of Somerset...
Strana 437 - Inclosures at that time began to be more frequent, whereby arable land, which could not be manured without people and families, was turned into pasture, which was easily rid by a few herdsmen ; and tenances for years, lives, and at will, whereupon much of the yeomanry lived, were turned into demesnes.
Strana 88 - That though the ecclesiastics served him not in person, it could not be inferred that they were unserviceable ; that the stripping the clergy of their estates would put a stop to their prayers night and day for the welfare of the state ; and there .was no expecting God's protection of the kingdom if the prayers of the church were so little valued." The Speaker of the Commons standing at the bar, smiled, and said openly, " that he thought the prayers of the church a very slender supply.
Strana 42 - ... presence doth silence and suspend all inferior jurisdiction and power. As for force, what subject can attempt, or assist, or counsel, or conceal violence, against his prince, and not incur the high and heinous crime of treason ? It is a common saying, ' Thought is free :' free indeed from punishment of secular laws, except by word or deed it break forth into action ; yet the secret thoughts against the sacred majesty of a prince — without attempt, without endeavour — have been adjudged worthy...
Strana 204 - That the Bishop of Winchester had, in his letter to the Duke of Bedford, plainly declared his malicious purpose of assembling the people, and stirring up a rebellion in the nation, contrary to the king's peace.
Strana 397 - We be determined," said the citizens of London in a petition to the King, "rather to adventure and to commit us to the peril of our lives and jeopardy of death than to live in such thraldom and bondage as we have lived...
Strana 438 - Enclosures they would not forbid, for that had been to forbid the improvement of the patrimony of the kingdom ; nor tillage they would not compel, for that was to strive with nature and utility...
Strana 437 - Certainly his times for good commonwealth's laws did excel. So as he may justly be celebrated for the best lawgiver to this nation, after King Edward the First; for his laws, whoso marks them well, are deep, and not vulgar ; not made upon the spur of a particular occasion for the present, but out of providence of the future, to make the estate of his people still more and more happy ; after the manner of the legislators in ancient and heroical times.
Strana 438 - That all houses of husbandry, that were used with twenty acres of ground and upwards, should be maintained and kept up for ever; together with a competent proportion of land to be used and occupied with them...

Bibliografické údaje