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attachés who arrived in Berlin from South America only to be snubbed by aristocratic secretaries at European legations. By his unconventional ways he abated the glory of the Master of Ceremonies at the court of Berlin, who was happy in many decorations and liked to invest the reception of a new ambassador with endless ceremonial. He defied etiquette and tradition by inviting unofficial personages into his sacred private office at the Wilhelmstrasse. The one respect in which he did not seem modern was in his correspond

He dictated nothing to a stenographer. He was one of the few Germans in exalted posts who could use a typewriter himself and upon which he condescended to tap even in the Wilhelmstrasse.68

ence.

es Adaptec from an article by Alexander Harvey in Current Opinion.

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THEGRER LYRIC
FRANCE
SERBIA

TAPAN
CONTENT

RUSSIA

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1. Obverse of design

2. Reverse (Figs 1 and

2 designed by J. E. Fraser)

4. Foreign service, not

in battle 7. Photograph of the

original clay model of the Victory Button, A. A. Weinman, Sculptor

3. Victory medal for

domestic service

6. Battle service, also

showing defensive
sector bar

6
THE AMERICAN VICTORY MEDAL

PHOTOGRAPHS © BY F. P. NERRITT

PERSONAL SKETCHES
THE TREATY OF PEACE

AND A

CHRONOLOGY OF THE WAR

Part II

THE CONFERENCE AND THE SIGNING

OF THE TREATY

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U.S. OFFICIAL PHOTO

PREMIER CLÉMENCEAU ADDRESSING THE GERMAN DELEGATES AT VERSAILLES The delegates have just arrived and taken their seats directly opposite Clémenceau at the extreme

left-hand table shown in the picture

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N the Quai d'Orsay in Paris on January 18 the curtain rose on

was the formal assembling of the Peace Conference,' in the famous Clock Hall of the Foreign Office. At the head of the council table was the gilded chair of the President of France, M. Poincaré. When all the chairs had been occupied some Indian princes in turbans gave to the scene its only distinctive costumes. It was an assemblage of the leading statesmen of the Entente world, German delegates not being present. At the head of the horseshoe were representatives of Great Britain and the United States; on the outside of the lefthand table representatives of British Colonies, whose recognition had been one of the significant acts of the conference, Australia coming first, Canada next, and India last. After the British Colonials came the Japanese. Inside both tables sat smaller nations, Cuba and America's ward, Haiti, included. Serbians sat alongside the newest nation of all, the Czecho-Slovaks; while French, Italians, Belgians, Roumanians and Brazilians sat on the outside of the right-hand table.

The United States, Great Britain, France, Italy, and Japan each had five delegates; the British Dominions and India two delegates respectively for Australia, Canada, South Africa, and India, including the Native States; one for New Zealand, and one for Newfoundland. Belgium, Serbia, and Brazil had each three delegates; China, Greece, Poland, Portugal, the Czecho-Slovak Republic, Roumania, two each; Siam, Cuba, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Liberia, Nicaragua, and Panama one each. Montenegro was to have had one, but the designation of this delegate was not to be made until the political situation in that country where King Nicholas had been deposed, had been stabilized. The apportionment as to Great Britain was not considered so much as giving preponderance to her and her colonies, as giving her colonies separate representation "according

1 The term "conference," as applied to a gathering of national delegates to negotiate terms of peace, has for some years been supplanting the term "congress," as used for the Vienna, Berlin, and other famous gatherings. There is no essential difference in the technical meaning of the two words as used for this purpose.

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