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intellect and refinement which adds so much to the charm of beauty in the sex. On the present occasion, her full blue eye reflected the feeling of sublimity that the scene excited, and her pleasant face was beaming with the pensive expression, with which all deep emotions, even though they bring the most grateful pleasure, shadow the countenances of the ingenuous and thoughtful.

And, truly, the scene was of a nature deeply to impress the imagination of the beholder. Towards the west, in which direction the faces of the party were turned, and in which alone could much be seen, the eye ranged over an ocean of leaves, glorious and rich in the varied but lively verdure of a generous vegetation, and shaded by the luxuriant tints that belong to the forty-second degree of latitude. The elm, with its graceful and weeping top, the rich varieties of the maple, most of the noble oaks of the American forest, with the broad-leafed linden, known in the parlance of the country as the bass-wood, mingled their uppermost branches, forming one broad and seemingly interminable carpet of foliage, that stretched away towards the setting sun, until it bounded the horizon, by blending with the clouds, as the waves and the sky meet at the base of the vault of Heaven. Here and there, by some accident of the tempests, or by a caprice of nature, a trifling opening among these giant members of the forest permitted an inferior tree to struggle upwards towards the light, and to lift its modest head nearly to a level with the surrounding surface of verdure. Of this class were the birch, a tree of some account in regions less favored, the quivering aspen, various generous nut-woods, and divers others that resembled the ignoble and vulgar, thrown by circumstances into the presence of the stately and great. Here and there, too, the tall, straight trunk of the pine pierced the vast field, rising high above it, like some grand monument reared by art on a plain of leaves.

It was the vastness of the view, the nearly unbroken surface of verdure, that contained the principle of grandeur. The beauty was to be traced in the delicate tints, relieved by gradations of

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light and shadow; while the solemn repose induced the feeling allied to awe.

“Uncle," said the wondering, but pleased girl, addressing her male companion, whose arm she rather touched than leaned on, to steady her own light but firm footing, “ this is like a view of the ocean you so much love !"

“So much for ignorance, and a girl's fancy, Magnet," a term of affection the sailor often used in allusion to his niece's personal attractions, “no one but a child would think of likening this handful of leaves to a look at the real Atlantic. You might seize all these tree-tops to Neptune's jacket, and they would make no more than a nosegay for his bosom.”

“More fanciful than true, I think, uncle. Look thither; it must be miles on miles, and yet we see nothing but leaves ! what more could one behold, if looking at the ocean ?”

“More !" returned the uncle, giving an impatient gesture with the elbow the other touched, for his arms were crossed, and the hands were thrust into the bosom of a vest of red cloth, a fashion of the times,“ more, Magnet ? say, rather, what less ? Where are your combing seas, your blue water, your rollers, your breakers, your whales, or your water-spouts, and your endless motion in this bit of a forest, child ?"

" And where are your tree-tops, your solemn silence, your fragrant leaves, and your beautiful green, uncle, on the ocean ?"

“ Tut, Magnet; if you understood the thing, you would know that green water is a sailor's bane. He scarcely relishes a green-horn less."

“ But green trees are a different thing. Hist! that sound is the air breathing among the leaves !"

“ You should hear a nor-wester breathe, girl, if you fancy wind aloft. Now, where are your gales, and hurricanes, and trades, and levanters, and such like incidents, in this bit of a forest, and what fishes have you swimming beneath yonder tame surface !"

" That there have been tempests here, these signs around us plainly show; and beasts, if not fishes, are beneath those leaves."

“ I do not know that,” returned the uncle, with a sailor's dogmatism. “They told us many stories at Albany, of the wild animals we should fall in with, and yet we have seen nothing to frighten a seal. I doubt if any of your inland animals will compare

with a low latitude shark !" " See !” exclaimed the piece, who was more occupied with the sublimity and beauty of the “boundless wood” than with her uncle's arguments, “ yonder is a smoke curling over the tops of the trees—can it come from a house ???

“Ay, ay; there is a look of humanity in that smoke,” returned the old seaman," which is worth a thousand trees; I must show it to Arrowhead, who may be running past a port without knowing it. It is probable there is a camboose where there is a smoke."

As he concluded, the uncle drew a hand from his bosom, touched the male Indian, who was standing near him, lightly on the shoulder, and pointed out a thin line of vapor that was stealing slowly out of the wilderness of leaves, at a distance of about a mile, and was diffusing itself in almost imperceptible threads of humidity, in the quivering atmosphere. Tuscarora was one of those noble-looking warriors that were oftener met with among the aborigines of this continent a century since, than to-day; and, while he had mingled sufficiently with the colonists to be familiar with their habits, and even with their language, he had lost little, if any, of the wild grandeur ; and simple dignity of a chief. Between him and the old seaman the intercourse had been friendly, but distant, for the Indian had been too much accustomed to mingle with the officers of the different military posts he had frequented, not to understand that his present companion was only a subordinate. So imposing, indeed, had been the quiet superiority of the Tuscarora's reserve, that Charles Cap, for so was the seaman named, in his most dogmatical or facetious moments, had not ventured on familiarity, in an intercourse that had now

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lasted more than a week. The sight of the curling smoke, however, had struck the latter like the sudden appearance of a sail at sea, and, for the first time since they met, he ventured to touch the warrior, as has been related.

The quick eye of the Tuscarora instantly caught a sight of the smoke, and for quite a minute he stood, slightly raised on tiptoe, with distended nostrils, like the buck that scents a taint in the air, and a gaze as riveted as that of the trained pointer, while he waits his master's aim. Then falling back on his feet, a low exclamation, in the soft tones that form so singular a contrast to its harsher cries in the Indian warrior's voice, was barely audible; otherwise, he was undisturbed. His countenance was calm, and his quick, dark, eagle eye moved, over the leafy panorama, as if to take in at a glance every circumstance that might enlighten his mind. That the long journey they had attempted to make through a broad belt of wilderness, was necessarily attended with danger, both uncle and niece well knew; though neither could at once determine whether the sign that others were in their vicinity, was the harbinger of good or evil.

“ There must be Oneidas or Tuscaroras near us, Arrowhead,” said Cap, addressing his Indian companion by his conventional English name; “ will it not be well to join company with them, and get a comfortable berth for the night in their wigwam ?”

“No wigwam there,” Arrowhead answered, in his unmoved manner—" too much tree.”

“But Indians must be there; perhaps some old messmates of your own, Master Arrowhead.”

“No Tuscarora-no Oneida--no Mohawk-pale-face fire."

“ The devil it is ! well, Magnet, this surpasses a seaman's philosophy-we old sea-dogs can tell a soldier's from a sailor's quid, or a lubber's nest from a mate's hammock; but I do not think the oldest admiral in his majesty's fleet can tell a king's smoke from a collier’s !"

The idea that human beings were in their vicinity in that ocean of wilderness, had deepened the flush on the blooming cheek and brightened the eye of the fair creature at his side, but she soon turned with a look of surprise to her relative, and said hesitatingly, for both had often admired the Tuscarora's knowledge, or we might almost say, instinct

“A pale-face's fire! Surely, uncle, he cannot know that !" “Ten days since, child, I would have sworn to it; but, now, I hardly know what to believe. May I take the liberty of asking, Arrowhead, why you fancy that smoke, now, a pale-face's smoke, and not a red-skin's ?"

“Wet wood,” returned the warrior, with the calmness with which the pedagogue might point out an arithmetical demonstration to his puzzled pupil.

“ Much wet-much smoke; much water-black smoke." “But, begging your pardon, Master Arrowhead, the smoke is nor is there much of it.

To my eye, now, it is as light and fanciful a smoke as ever rose from a captain's tea-kettle, when nothing was left to make the fire but a few chips from the dunnage.”

“Too much water,” returned Arrowhead, with a slight nod of the head : “Tuscarora too cunning to make fire with water ; pale-face too much book, and burn anything; much book,

Inot black,

little know."

“Well, that's reasonable, I allow,” said Cap, who was no devotee of learning: “ he means that as a hit at your reading, Magnet, for the Chief has sensible notions of things in his own

How far, now, Arrowhead, do you make us by your calculation, from the bit of a pond that you call the Great Lake, and towards which we have been so many days shaping our

way.

course ?"

The Tuscarora looked at the seaman with quiet superiority,

as he answered,

* Ontario, like heaven; one sun, and the great traveller will

know it."

“ Well, I have been a great traveller, I cannot deny, but of all my v'g'ges this has been the longest, the least profitable, and the furthest inland. If this body of fresh water is so nigb, Arrow

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