Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub

(Continued from page 5)

American offensive. When the war was The title indicates the diversity of the over, in order to get as far away from it three principal artists whose work ap- as possible, he went to China-only to be pears in this issue of SCRIBNER'S.

there in the midst of the Korean troubles. Will James, whose “The Makings of a He is now living in a French peasant cotCow-Horse” shows him to be an artist tage at Harmon-on-Hudson, where he both with the pen and with cowboy ver- thinks war will not penetrate soon. nacular, says he is no "atmosphere Westerner.”

Clarence Rowe avers that his family “I didn't ride the range and bust bron- would think him thwarted in his career if cos to get the romance of the West,” he they knew the facts. said in a recent interview. “That is for "Years ago as a lad," he says, “I rolled Pullman and lounge lizards. I stayed out of a hammock on a hot summer's day there because I had to eat. On the range with the remark that 'It was awful hard in Montana we sometimes spent from six- work to hold together.' teen to eighteen hours in the saddle and “My family held this to be the superlarode four horses each day. Often the tive of laziness. To them the remark is a bedding was wet, the biscuits full of sand, classic. I have never lived it down. All the ropes and saddles frozen, and the through boyhood sympathy was extended horses had stiff little lumps in their backs. me in my brave efforts merely to keep my God! Those were tough days."

body intact.

Away out in Denver on the inkLeRoy Baldridge will probably object splashed and much bedrawn walls of the to our calling him a warrior, for he says art room of The Rocky Mountain Times he has no patience with the way civiliza- hangs a motto, 'Art is a means of avoiding tion takes of settling disputes. "But he is hard work. If my family ever saw that, on the warpath for pacifism, which proves it would explain to them instantly why I our point. From Boyd's writing and selected Art as a career. Baldridge's conversation it is evident that “On that basis I have been sadly both hate war with an enduring hatred. double-crossed, for Art is the most reIn spite of this or, rather, because of this, lentless of taskmasters." both are most convincing when they por- The frontispiece and other illustrations tray it, as “Rintintin" and its illustra- for "The Apollo d'Oro" show that Mr. tions show.

Rowe has borne up under his great disilThe artist is known to literally thou- lusionment and demonstrate his theory sands of ex-service men by his drawings that line work must have "the careless for The Stars and Stripes, the A. E. F. freedom of a beautiful girl's hair blowing paper. He has seen war in all its forms about in a gentle breeze." and had the unique experience of going "A line drawing should look so free and through Belgium with the German army easy and joyous that any one could have in 1914. He did not return with any great picked up a pen and dashed it off. It is a horror at “German atrocities.” He saw success like the girl's hair in thatit, too, conservice with the French and was in every ceals the hours of hard labor put upon it."

Reconstruction-Material and Moral

Captain Raymond Recouly, author of Revue de France and expects to visit this “Reconstruction in France,” in this num- country in the fall. ber, is one of the leading journalists of France. He is perhaps better known in At last we have found a man in love this country as the famous “Captain X,” with his job. Whiting Williams declares under which nom de plume he published a he would not trade places with any one number of articles in SCRIBNER's during just now, so optimistic is he with regard the War. He is now connected with the

(Continued on page 9)

[graphic][ocr errors]

“Quick ... an automobile accident!”

Years of careful driving ... A growing sense of immunity from loss ... Then it happened!

“Quick . . . an automobile accident!" Tragedy is in that frenzied cry. Somebody is badly hurt. . . . A quick run to the hospital ... Doctors Nurses ... Weeks of suffering ... And a suit for damages ... A big verdict against someone!

[graphic]

ÆTNA-IZE

"QUICK ... an automobile accident!" Though

if it is damaged by collision—if it damages other you have driven a car without accident for years,

property—you can be secured against all loss. the very next mile may tell a different story.

Added to this protection is our special auto The congested city street, the speedy turn

mobile service, which makes available to you the pike, the narrow country road-each has its

ready co-operation of more than 10,000 Ætna own particular risk.

agents in all parts of the country to save you annoy. Verdicts for heavy personal injury damages are the ance and anxieties in the event of an accident. rule these days. Court awards, almost without excep. The Ætna Life Insurance Company and affiliated tion, are far in excess of the limited liability insurance companies are the strongest multiple-line insurance carried by the average motorist. Who will bear the organization in the world. loss when your accident comes? A verdict that might See the Ætna representative in your community to sweep away savings, home or business!

day. He can give you full protection for all your inUnder an Ætna Combination Automobile Policy surance needs, great or small-provide unquestionable there are no limits to the protection you may obtain. security for your business, your property, your income If your car injures persons—if it is stolen—if it burns- and your life. He is a man worth knowing.

ÆTNA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY AND AFFILIATED COMPANIES ÆTNA CASUALTY AND SURETY CO.

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE CO., OP HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT

Ætna Protection Includes ... Lire ... Accident ... Health ... Group Lipe ... Group DISABILITY ... AUTOMOBILE ... COMPENSATION

LIABILITY . , BURGLARY .. Plate Glass . . Water Damage .. Fire .. MARINE .. TRANSPORTATION .. FIDELITY BONDS . . SURETY BONDS

In writing to advertisers please mention SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE

to the work he is doing. His job is to is the novel, and is of the opinion that if. make the workman like his work, or the Aristotle were writing his “Poetics” now employer make the job agreeable to the he would deal exclusively with the novel. workman. He is encouraged with the co- The writer likes long poems, but has never operation which he is receiving from large been able to write a good one, he says. employers. Already between a quarter Another indication of his love of nature is and a half million workers are reached by that his first book was a critical study of his efforts. He is dividing his time be- Thoreau. He has since written one on tween study of the problem, teaching it the poetry of John Dryden. Hs is a memin the business schools of Harvard and ber of the reviewing staff of The Nation. Dartmouth, and helping employers apply the principle.

The other poet whose work appears in Despatches from Europe in the daily this number, Mrs. Grace Noll Crowell, papers indicate that the encouragement writes: "I am pleased that you are going which he holds out in "Boycotting the to use my 'Silver Poplars' in the April Dollar," in this number, is justified by the number. It is really an April poem. I results being achieved.

remember writing a poem called 'Waste

Places.' I wrote it on one of the hottest And here is another who writes for the days that a Texas August can produce. pure love of it-Mark Van Doren, whose It seethed with lizards, cactus, and hot poem “ Alfalfa Coming," in this number, blazing sand-all gasping for air. It was is an example of his keen observation and intended for an August issue, but lo! his gift of phrasing. He is at present the magazine that accepted it ran it in lecturing in Doctor Brander Matthews's January. Almost I considered that a undergraduate course at Columbia. “Mr."waste place.'” Van Doren says he did not realize that It may be, however, that there was he was so little a city man until he be- method in this editor's madness. Perhaps gan to write poetry four years ago. Even he intended to give his readers a little though he was in Paris and enjoying warmth in the midst of a northern winter. himself thoroughly, his poem was of re- The poet is a resident of Dallas, Texas, membered things in the country. and during the past year has won five

Mr. Van Doren holds to the unique poetry prizes in her State.

Furniture and Finance

We leave the comment on William of beauty-or that the souls of the conLyon Phelps this month to a lone soldier sumers are not—which is the same thing. in the Hawaiian Islands, which will be found in “What You Think about It" When Cyrus H. K. Curtis bought the following Mr. Noyes's department. New York Evening Post, some time ago, it

caused a stir in newspaper circles which Perhaps there are few who regard has not subsided yet, even though it is furniture as in the field of art. But Royal superseded by Mr. Munsey's recent acCortissoz has put it there this month. quisition as the principal topic. Few, The critic blasts the idea that quantity however, knew why the veteran publisher production is ruining everything. After decided to enter the New York field. He all, one wonders why a piece of furniture explained it himself before an assemblage should be regarded as beautiful merely of newspaper men in Boston recently, because it is old. Better one beautiful according to Editor and Publisher. He piece of new furniture than a thousand of bought it because of the exceptional the horsehair sofa type. The remarkable financial department, developed under example of co-operation between the mu- the direction of Alexander Dana Noyes, seum and the factory as set forth in "The whose department, “The Financial SituaField of Art” shows that the souls of all tion,” in this magazine indicates the manufacturers are not dead to the appeal keenness of Mr. Curtis's judgment.

[graphic]

DISTINGUISHED BY ITS FICTION

John Galsworthy

Thomas Boyd

Galsworthy The White Monkey
The affair with Wilfred comes to a head in the second part of Mr. Galsworthy's new
novel, forming a complete episode in itself. Fleur's visit to Wilfred's rooms and
what comes of it.

THOMAS BOYD Unadorned
The second of the “Points of Honor" series by the author of “Through the Wheat.”
A vivid tale of the extremities to which a human being can be driven to preserve
his sense of honor when goaded by a sneer.

McCREADY HUSTON 'Not Poppy
Greater love hath no man than this that he smirch his honor before the woman he
loves in order to uphold her illusions.

Leigh MORTON Mrs. Denton Gets Off
An estimate of the length to which apron-strings can go without breaking. This story
answers the question of whether children owe duty to their parents or vice versa.
Mrs. Denton found out “where she got off” and she retaliates.

Four Feature Articles

Do Writers Just HaveStyle? W. C. Brownell advances the opinion that nature and art cannot become associated so closely as to become identical, in this first of three essays on "Style". He discusses the modern faith with regard to natural ability and “self-expression,” and shows the difference between Style and a style.

Sun Spots As Magnets Dr. George Ellery Hale tells of the results of the latest investigations with the giant 150-foot tower telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory on the nature of sun spots and explains the theory that they are storm areas, regions in which luminous gases cooled by centrifugal action appear as darkened clouds.

KERMIT ROOSEVELT continues his account of his hunting adventures in India. This second part of "In the Land Where the Elephants Åre” tells of hunting on elephants, and is full of the atmosphere of the jungle. Captain Roosevelt describes the excitement of the kill and the fascination of the many strange animals which he saw, and includes in his article amusing anecdotes of Mahaboob Khan, the shikarry.

Quenching America's Mental Thirst Gregory Mason says that the average city dweller knows nothing about lectures. "The amount of oratorical punishment assimilated in the corn belt would stagger a metropolitan,” he adds in discussing the lyceum, the Chautauqua, and their ilk, together with the types of audiences which one encounters. He hands the palm to the agricultural audience as more intelligent than the industrial one. He regards the thirst for information as a healthy sign. Departments Cortissokeri Financial SITUATION, by Alexander Dana

Noyes. As I Like It, by William Lyon Phelps.

[graphic]
[graphic][subsumed][merged small][graphic][merged small]

Readers of Scribner's Magazine are invited to make use of our Investment Service Department. Every investor at times needs reliable, unbiassed informa. tion regarding investment offerings. There is no charge for our services. Address Investor's Service Bureau, Scribner's Magasine, 597 Fifth Ave., New York

CHARLES SCRIBNER's sons, 597-599 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK

Please send SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE for one year. Signed
Name........
Address...

Without Cost to You Sign the coupon and we will include with. out cost a copy of the current issue of SCRIBNER'S

MAGAZINE

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

SCRIBNER'S

MAGAZINE

Illustrated
Contents for MAY 1924

506 516

SINBAD AND THE ELEPHANTS

· Frontispiece From a decorative panel by J. M. Sert.

See “The Field of Art." “IN THE LAND WHERE THE ELEPHANTS ARE"

Kermit Roosevelt

467 Illustrations from photographs made by Mr. Roosevelt and Mr. D. S. Ellsworth. SECOND

PAPER.
THE WHITE MONKEY-Serial. Part I.
Chapters VI-IX

John Galsworthy

478 THE RIDER OF THE WIND. Poem

Eleanor Baldwin

494 UNADORNED-A Story

Thomas Boyd

495 Illustrations by C. LeRoy Baldridge. STYLE-I.-ORDER AND MOVEMENTMANNER AND PERSONALITY

W. C. Brownell . WISDOM. Poem .

Charles Hanson Towne MRS. DENTON GETS OFF-A Story

Leigh Morton

517 Illustrations by Reginald Birch. SUN-SPOTS AS MAGNETS.

George Ellery Hale

527 Illustrations from photographs and diagrams. “NOT POPPY”--A Story

McCready Huston

543 Illustration by Eugene c. Cassady. QUENCHING AMERICA'S MENTAL THIRST

Gregory Mason.

552 OUR MODERN OLD PEOPLE

.

Virginia Terhune Van de Water 558 THE PRISON. Poem

Louis Dodge

561 AS I LIKE IT

William Lyon Phelps

562 THE FIELD OF ART--Besnard and Some

Others-New York as a Clearing House
for Foreign Art

Royal Cortissoz

569 THE FINANCIAL SITUATION–Fall in Staple Prices and Rise of Foreign Exchange—The

Rapid Decline of Wheat and Cotton-Low Money Rates and Stock Market-The Franc's Extraordinary Recovery

Alexander Dana Noyes

577 BEHIND THE SCENES WITH SCRIBNER'S AUTHORS

FRONT ADVERTISING SECTION WHAT YOU THINK ABOUT IT

BACK ADVERTISING SECTION ROTOGRAVURE STYLE SECTION

BACK ADVERTISING SECTION

PUBLISHED MONTHLY. PRICE 35 CENTS A NUMBER; $4.00 A YEAR In the United States and possessions, and in Canada: Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic,

Ecuador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Salvador, Spain, Panama, and Peru, $4.00 a year.

To other Foreign Countries in the Postal Union, postpaid, $5.00 a year. CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS NEW YORK Publishers of SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE and ARCHITECTURE

Cover Design by William Jordan

Copyrighted In 1924 in United States, Canada, and Great Britain by Charles Scribner's Sons. Printed in New York. All rights reserved. Entered as Second-Class Matter December 2, 1886, at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act

of March 3, 1879. Entered as Second-Class Matter at the Post-Office Department, Ottawa, Canada.

« PředchozíPokračovat »