Taft Papers on League of Nations

Přední strana obálky
Ohio University Press, 2003 - Počet stran: 302

Eager to turn the congressional election of 1918 into a confirmation of his foreign policy, President Woodrow Wilson was criticized for abandoning the spirit of the popular slogan "Politics adjourned "

His predecessor, William Howard Taft, found Wilson difficult to deal with and took issue with his version of the League of Nations, which Taft felt was inferior to the model proposed by the League to Enforce Peace. Rather than join the massive Republican opposition to the Treaty of Versailles, however, Taft instead supported Wilson's controversial decision to travel to Paris as the head of the American peace delegation, and he defended the critical tenth article in the covenant, which detractors saw as a surrender of American sovereignty. He also counseled Wilson to insert a clause concerning the Monroe Doctrine that would pacify the Senate's group of "reservationists," whose votes were essential to approval of the treaty.

Volume VII in The Collected Works of William Howard Taft consists of the Taft Papers on League of Nations originally published in 1920. This is a collection ofTaft's speeches, newspaper articles, and complementary documents that reflect his consistent support for a league of nations and, eventually, for the Covenant of the League of Nations emanating from the Paris Peace Conference.

Although the failure of the treaty and its League of Nations can probably be laid at the feet of an obstinate Wilson and a wily Henry Cabot Lodge, William Howard Taft can be credited with rising above partisanship to emerge as the League's most consistent supporter.

As in the rest of the Collected Works, Taft Papers on League of Nations provides a window on the machinations surrounding some of the most significant decisions of the era.

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Obsah

1 League to Enforce Peace
3
2 Victory Program
5
3 The Paris Covenant for a League of Nations
8
4 Plan for a League of Nations to Enforce Peace
36
5 Proposals of the League to Enforce Peace
50
6 Constitutionality of the Proposals
55
7 A Constructive Plan for Human Betterment
62
8 The Purposes of the League
73
29 Criticism Should Be Constructive
182
30 Roosevelts Contribution to League of Nations
185
31 The League of Nations What It Means and Why It Must Be
189
32 League of Nations and President Wilsons Advisers
194
33 The League of Nations Is Here
197
34 The Leagues Bite
201
35 The League of Nations and the German Colonies
205
36 From an Address at the Atlantic Congress for a League of Nations New York
209

9 Statement Made at Richmond Virginia March21 1917
78
10 The Menace of a Premature Peace
80
11 World Peace Debate
93
12 Victory with Power
118
13 Our Purpose
120
14 Self Determination
123
15 Peril in Hun Peace Offer
125
16 The Obligations of Victory
128
17 Workingmen and the League
138
18 A League of Nations Our National Policy
140
19 Why a League of Nations Is Necessary
143
20 Lesser League of Nations
147
21 Disarmament of Nations and Freedom of the Seas
150
22 The League of Nations and the German Colonies
152
23 The League of Nations and Religious Liberty
154
24 President Wilson and the League of Nations
157
25 Senator Lodge on the League of Nations
161
Why and How
165
27 From an Article in the Public Ledger
178
28 Representation in the League
179
37 Ireland and the League
210
38 The Great Covenant of Paris
213
39 To Business Men
223
40 From an Address at San Francisco
228
41 From an Address at Salt Lake City
230
42 League of Nations as Barrier to Any Great Wars in Future
237
43 The Paris Covenant for a League of Nations
241
44 Answer to Senator Knoxs Indictment
255
45 Paris Covenant Has Teeth
263
46 To Make Peace Secure
267
47 League of Nations Has Not Delayed Peace
271
48 Open Diplomacy Slow
274
49 Russia France Danzig
277
50 The Round Robin
279
51 Guaranties of Article X
281
52 Religious and Racial Freedom
283
53 Secret Treaty Provisions That Are at the Root of the Crisis at the Paris Conference
285
54 Analysis of the League Covenant as Amended
287
55 Correspondence
294
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O autorovi (2003)

The late Frank X. Gerrity was a professor of American history at St. Joseph's University, Philadelphia, specializing in the diplomatic history of the United States.

Bibliografické údaje