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• Milton, plus sublimé qu'eux tous, and religion were mere names, or A des beautés moins agreable ;' not better than superficial science supported an entirely opposite o. or hateful superstition. The use pinion, in an insipid work of his of arms was fully allowed, by old age, called • Le Taureau blanc.' which means alone the poor were He saw nothing in Paradise Lost protected and provided for, and the but a ridiculous tale sur un serpent female sex defended from insult, et une pomme. Helvetius, though or their dishonour revenged. he was an atheist, thought differ. The robbers in this play are eager ently. After a long dispute with to sacrifice the infamous Charles, Voltaire in favour of Milton,Vous and in fact he is buried in the avez beau faire,' says he, “ le diable tomb he had prepared for his faest mon homme.'

ther. How do they calch every

word of Kozinki's tale, and how do THE ROBBERS.

they burn for revenge on the vilThere is doubt some raving lanous prince, the possessor of his and theatrical declamation in the Amelia. Indeed our state of civ: tragedy of the Robbers, but I do ilization is no standard, by which pity the soul, that is not melted the feudal ages are to be tried: with its tenderness and roused by To me it appears, that the crimes its energies. Perhaps, in the of the robbers were the common whole fairy-ground of fiction, a disorders committed by the strong; character like Moor cannot be and so universal were the ravages found. His revenge is of the most of a similar nature, that I rather natural kind, always uniform, and consider the actions and bloody wonderfully great. The kind feel thoughts of the robbers as necesings are not buried nor destroyed... sary consequences of barbarism, they only slumber in temporary than criminal aberrations from torpor. Sentiments the most moral virtue. The language of manly, and perceptions which sa- the play is generally natural. It vour of true greatness, are often ex- is strong in a high degree, and pressed in language the most forci- powerfully impresses the dictates ble and sublime. As for Francis, of revenge, the emotions of terror, he has the form, the features, and and the sentiments of pity." the folly of a villain. Great art is clearly exhibited in his manner of ELEGIES OF PROPERTIUS AND TIdeceiving his father, and his subsequent conduct makes him the PROPERTIUS is one of the writ. finished hero of vice. Who does ers of antiquity, who was the latnot love Amelia ? so constant in est discovered ; and who has not her affection, so great in her ha- been transmitted to us without tred. As for the robbers, how great mutilations. The critnicely are their characters and dis- icks have not been able to estabpositions marked ! all are crimi. lish his text but by much conjec. nal, yet some are perhaps to be ture ; they have transposed his pitied, and others are downright elegies, and intermingled the lines, offenders, with blackest hearts and so that there is much reason to be. hands full of shameful vice. But lieve that this labour has not been if we consider the state of society always successful, and that the at that time, they will not appear beauties of this writer has sufferso very detestable. Knowledgeed much depreciation in the hand

BULLUS.

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ians

Quindihin.

than

CHEET more passion;

charm so

Jorer of Delia.

Milton is authors, wh TOP Mert In have lost will be restored, and on

men are often affection will be as pure and s long as the

profusion of lasting, as the paradise, which w merely on

which oc- shall inhabit.' The lovely flowers unrivaller

will be revived with increased bear lime, bu

cu- mint every line and which which are now withered and gone, interest

ty ; no more will the lily and the s pused to the language The G the R

Arred Prigentius to Tibullus, but morning dew, be an emblem of

he oriently gives the palm to the sorrowing virtue ; for every gale Can cill of taste will be of the opinion of phyr fragrance.

It is not that Properan sic

PICTURE OF A WIFE. ties has not beauties of the first

The wise Theognis told his p р örder: he has more force and

Tibullus; a sensibility countrymen, that that man was the penetrating, and more of richest and most happy, whio had

but nothing can exceed found an amiable and virtuous the grace, the sweetness, that wife. Socrates, however, was of

irresistible, those verses a very different opinion. A young Co tender and melodious, of the man once consulted him to know, !

whether he would advise him to

marry or not ; to whom Socrates DISAPPOINTMENT AND HOPE. thus replied, “ Young man, which

The morn of my life was cheer- ever of the two evils you choose, ful as the singing of birds, and you will most certainly have cause lovely as the 'opening of spring; for repentance. If you should not a cloud arose to mar its beau- prefer celibacy,---you will be soiity, or obscure the bright sun of in- iary on the earth, you will never nocence and youth ; every sense enjoy the pleasures of a parent ; was gratified, every flower was with thee will perish thy race, and sweet, and every rose without a à stranger will succeed to thy pro thorn. Every kiss was a pledge perty. If you marry, expect conof affection, and every friend was stant chagrin and quarrels without true. My cheeks were then bloom- end. Your wife will be constantly ing with health, and my eyes glis. reproaching you of the dower she tened with happiness. But, alas! brought thee; the pride of her par. the charm is broken, the scene isents and the garrulity of her mother changed, the flowers have lost their will become insupportable. The fragrance, and on every rose I have gallantries of your wife will torfound a thorn. Friends, who were ment you with jealousy, and you dear have departed, and nothing is will have reason to doubt the fa. Jeft me, but the melancholy recol. ther of your reputed children. Now, lection of joys that are fled. Grief young man, divine if thou canst, has stolen the rose from my cheek, and choose if thou darest.' This and my eyes overflow with tears. anecdote of Socrates I give on But a little while, and my sorrows the authority of Valerius Maxi. will be over and forgotten ; my mus. Socrates was probably sufheartstrings, which are now touch-fering from the stings and arrows ed with anguish, will then thrill of outrageous Xantippe, he was with rapture ; my friends which I writhing under the pangs of des

pised love, when the young man should be full of taste, and let her unfortunately went to ask his opin- manners be those of a gentlewo. ion, and therefore it is not entitled man, for country simplicity is mere to much respect. We agree with country awkwardness, and that I the wise Theognis and acknowl. cannot away with. If her ancesedge, that in the wide range of tors were not illustrious, I should the bounties of heaven, there is no hope that her family name might gift, bestowed on man, deserving be respectable. Her disposition, I so much thankfulness, as that of a insist on this, must be gentle and good wife. But what do you call soft, like the dew in the vallies of good ? Here is the difficulty-this Languedoc ; like the midnight myis the knot-this the perplexity. sick of romance from the battleI cannot tell what you and other ments of Udolpho. She shall not men would like, but know exactly be churlish, and peevish, and fretwhat would please such a curious ful, and scolding; but let her have kind of being as myself. I would good nature in full abundance, and never marry for money ; for con- kind words, looks, and smiles, plen: tracts of bargain and sale in mat- tiful and pleasant, as thick, ripo ters of matrimony were invented wheat in autumn. Then her mind by infernals for the deep damnation must be cultivated. This too is of man"; they are legislations of essential. She must love to read; wrong, and indentures of infamy. she must be able to think, and I should like well enough that my have opinions of her own. I wish wife might be handsome, though that she may- relish the poets of this is a minor consideration ; for England, love the morality of real beauty is not to be found, and Johnson, the courtly sense of the I care not to be hunting for it Spectator, and that her soul may, through city and country all the be attuned to the sweetest melody, days of my life. The mild lustre by the wild warbling of the bard of Phosphor is not seen in the face of Avon. She should read and of the daughters of Eve, and where remember the bistorians of Greatis the being who sheds soft beams Britain, and know what may be from her eye, like those of the easily known of her own country: planet of evening? Let her per. Lastly, and above all, she must son have the form of elegance, and study her bible, be a christian, and the sweetness of purity; her dress reverence ber God.

POETRY.

EXTRACTS FROM "THE SPIRIT OF DISCOVERY," A LATE PUBLICA

TION BY REV. W. L. BOWLES.

(Except Burns and Cowper, no poet of "ALL WAS ONE WASTE OF WAVES, the present day 'has been so gener

that bury'd deep ally admired as Mr. Bowles. The Earth and its multitudes : the ark alone, beautiful imagery and natural feeling, High on the cloudy van of Ararat, with which his poems abound, have Rested ; for now the death-commisfound their way to the heart of those sion'd storm for whom poetry was written. The Sinks silent, and the eye of day looks out poem opens with the resting of the Dim through the baze, while short suco ark upon Aratat.)

cessive gleams

of these wise commenlators. In have lost will be restored, and our reading Propertius we are often affection will be as pure and as disgusted with the profusion of lasting, as the paradise, which we mythological allusion, which oc- shall inhabit. The lovely flowers, cur in almost every line,and which which are now withered and gone; is so opposed to the language will be revived with increased beauof passion. Quintilian declared, ty ; no more will the lily and the that in his time some persons pre- rose, when sparkling with the ferred Propertius to Tibullus, but morning dew, be an emblem of he evidently gives the paim to the sorrowing virtue ; for every gale last, and I believe that every man will waft happiness, and every zeof taste will be of the opinion of phyr fragrance. Quintilian. It is not that Propertius has not beauties of the first PICTURE OF A WIFE. order : he has more force and The vise Theognis told his energy than Tibullus; a sensibility countrymen, that that man was the more penetrating, and more of richest and most happy, who had passion ; but nothing can exceed found an amiable and virtuous the grace, the sweetness, that wife. Socrates, however, was of charm so irresistible, those verses a very different opinion. A young so tender and melodious, of the man once consulted him to know, lorer of Delia.

whether he would advise him to

marry or not; to whom Socrates DISAPPOINTMENT AND HOPE. thus replied, “ Young man, which

The morn of my life was cheer- ever of the two evils you choose, ful as the singing of birds, and you will most certainly have cause lovely as the opening of spring; for repentance. If you should not a cloud arose to mar its beau. prefer celibacy,—you will be solity, or obscure the bright sun of in- tary on the earth, you will never nocence and youth ; every sense enjoy the pleasures of a parent ; was gratified, every flower was with thee will perish thy race, and sweet, and every rose without a å stranger will succeed to thy prothorn. Every kiss was a pledge perty. If you marry, expect conof affection, and every friend was stant chagrin and quarrels without true. My cheeks were then bloom- end. Your wife will be constantly ing with health, and my eyes glis. reproaching you of the dower she tened with happiness. But, alas! brought thee; the pride of her par. the charm is broken, the scene is ents and the garrulity of her mother changed, the flowers have lost their will become insupportable. The fragrance, and on every rose I have gallantries of your wife will torfound a thorn. Friends, who were ment you with jealousy, and you dear have departed, and nothing is will have reason to doubt the fa. Jeft me, but the melancholy recol- ther of your reputed children. Now, lection of joys that are fied. Grief young man, divine if thou canst, has stolen the rose from my cheek, and choose if thou darest.' This and my eyes overflow with tears. anecdote of Socrates I give on But a little while, and my sorrows the authority of Valerius Maxi. will be over and forgotten ; my mus. Socrates was probably sufheartstrings, which are now touch. fering from the stings and arrows ed with anguish, will then thrill of outrageous Xantippe, he was with rapture ; my friends which I writhing under the pangs of des.

pised love, when the young man should be full of taste, and let her unfortunately went to ask his opin- manners be those of a gentlewoion, and therefore it is not entitled man, for country simplicity is mere to much respect. We agree with country awkwardness, and that ! the wise Theogpis and acknowl. cannot away with. If her ances. edge, that in the wide range of tors were not illustrious, I should the bounties of heaven, there is no hope that her family name might gift, bestowed on man, deserving be respectable. Her disposition, I so much thankfulness, as that of a insist on this, must be gentle and good wife. But what do you call soft, like the dew in the vallies of good ? Here is the difficulty--this Languedoc ; like the midnight muis the knot this the perplexity. sick of romance from the battleI cannot tell what you and other ments of Udolpho. She shall not men would like, but know exactly be churlish, and peevish, and fretwhat would please such a curious ful, and scolding; but let her have kind of being as myself. I would good nature in full abundance, and Dever marry for money ; for con- kind words, looks, and smiles, plentracts of bargain and sale in mat- tiful and pleasant, as thick, ripe ters of matrimony were invented wheat in autumn. Then her mind by infernals for the deep damnation must be cultivated. This too is of man"; they are legislations of essential. She must love to read; wrong, and indentures of infamy. she must be able to think, and I should like well enough that my have opinions of her own. I wish wife might be handsome, though that she may relish the poets of this is a minor consideration ; for England, love the morality of real beauty is not to be found, and Johnson, the courtly sense of the I care not to be hunting for it Spectator, and that her soul may, through city and country all the be attuned to the sweetest melody, days of my life. The mild lustre by the wild warbling of the bard of Phosphor is not seen in the face of Avon. She should read and of the daughters of Eve, and where remember the historians of Greatis the being who sheds soft beams Britain, and know what may be from her eye, like those of the easily known of her own country. planet of evening? Let her per. Lastly, and above all, she must son have the form of elegance, and study her bible, be a christian, and the sweetness of purity; her dress reverence her God.

POETRY.

EXTRACTS FROM "THE SPIRIT OF DISCOVERY," A LATE PUBLICA

TION BY REV. W. L. BOWLES.

[Except Burns and Cowper, no poet of ALL WAS ONE WASTE OF WAVES,

the present day has been so gener- that bury'd deep ally admired as Mr. Bowles. The Earth and its multitudes : the ark alone, beautiful imagery and natural feeling, High on the cloudy van of Ararat, with which his poems abound, have Rested; for now the death-commisfound their way to the heart of those sion'd storm for whom poetry was written. The Sinks silent, and the eye of day looks out poem opens with the resting of the Dim through the haze, while short suc. ark upon Aratat.)

cessive gleams

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