The Atlantic Monthly, Svazek 11

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Atlantic Monthly Company, 1863
 

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Strana 501 - Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Strana 72 - No body wishes more than I do to see such proofs as you exhibit, that nature has given to our black brethren talents equal to those of the other colors of men, and that the appearance of a want of them is owing merely to the degraded condition of their existence, both in Africa and America.
Strana 112 - The prevailing ideas entertained by him and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old Constitution were that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of Nature, that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically.
Strana 112 - But, not to be tedious in enumerating the numerous changes for the better, allow me to allude to one other — though last, not least: the new Constitution has put at rest forever all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institution — African slavery as it exists among us — the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and the present revolution. Jefferson, in his forecast, had anticipated this, as the 'rock upon which...
Strana 290 - THE VAGABONDS. WE are two travellers, Roger and I. Roger's my dog : — come here, you scamp ! Jump for the gentlemen, — mind your eye ! Over the table, — look out for the lamp ! — The rogue is growing a little old ; Five years we've tramped through wind and weather, And slept out-doors when nights were cold, And ate and drank — and starved together.
Strana 291 - There isn't another creature living Would do it, and prove, through every disaster, So fond, so faithful, and so forgiving, To such a miserable, thankless master ! No, Sir ! see him wag his tail, and grin ! By George ! it makes my old eyes water...
Strana 87 - If there be some weaker one, Give me strength to help him on ; If a blinder soul there be, Let me guide him nearer Thee. Make my mortal dreams come true With the work I fain would do ; Clothe with life the weak intent, Let me be the thing I meant ; Let me find in Thy employ Peace that dearer is than joy ; Out of self to love be led And to heaven acclimated, Until all things sweet and good Seem my natural habitude.
Strana 467 - Mysterious Night ! when our first Parent knew Thee from report divine, and heard thy name, Did he not tremble for this lovely frame, This glorious canopy of light and blue ? Yet 'neath a curtain of translucent dew, Bathed in the rays of the great setting flame, Hesperus with the host of heaven came; And lo, Creation widened in man's view.
Strana 199 - I break your bonds and masterships, And I unchain the slave : Free be his heart and hand henceforth As wind and wandering wave. I cause from every creature His proper good to flow: As much as he is and doeth, So much he shall bestow.
Strana 625 - Origin and History of the English Language, and of the early literature it embodies. By the Hon. George P. Marsh. US Minister at Turin, Author of " Lectures on the English Language.

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