Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub

of a ship were visible, and here and there fishing boats dotted the unruffled surface of the clear, deep blue ocean. Flocks of seagulls wheeled their graceful flight, and dippel their snowy breasts, and, as the invalid continued to watch, her eyes filled unconsciously with tears, but not of sadness, and she wept long and silently.

Not a word was spoken; but the father :ceived the emotion of his child ere she ist felt it, and, suppressing his own, med not to see the effects of her

1's and fading health. He forced a le upon his careworn features, and strained cerfulness in his voice ill according with lings at his heart. je, Grace," said he, endeavouring to On's attention from her absorbing sing one of your cheerful songs.

quite as musical as in

home."

[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

THE ENGLISH FIRESIDE.

CHAPTER I.

“ He that stands upon a slippery place,

Makes nice of no vile hold to stay him up."

[ocr errors]

“ The sun is up and 'tis a morn of May," a bright, laughing, merry morn. There was music on every bough and twig. Bees and butterflies sucked and sipped the early fresh-born flowers of the spring. The soaring pinioned lark trilled his ringing notes to heaven's ethereal vault, and then, stooping from his dizzy height, dropped like an arrow to his mate in her grassy nest. Nature-godlike nature—revelled in her beauty ! The sun-lit, flashing stream was her mirror. Joy and gladness were

VOL. II.

B

her handmaids. The heraldy of summer tror in their footsteps, and, as they tripped their way through flowery means and money dells, daisies, primroses, and buttercups opener their maiden bloggoms to mark the path they took The thrift.y ant left her carthy home, and again sought the replenishment of her store.

Amorois grasshoppers chirper their love ditties, and even that dull laggard, the spotted toad, roded from his long, long sleep, croaked in doleful cadence his heartfelt satisfaction.

Vot a creature, not a thing --not even the meanest wild flower that grew unnoticed and uncared for-but looked the very type of unalloyed, unqualified happiness

On a becitling cliff, rearing its giant crest some hundreds of feet above the dashing Waves at its bute, the invalid Ellen, accompanied by Grace and her father, was sitting yazing upon the exquisite beauties of the cene. Far, far at sea the bleached sails of a ship were visible, and here and there fishing boats dotted the unruffled surface of the clear, deep blue ocean. Flocks of seagulls wheeled their graceful flight, and dipped their snowy breasts, and, as the invalid continued to watch, her eyes filled unconsciously with tears, but not of sadness, and she wept long and silently.

Not a word was spoken; but the father perceived the emotion of his child ere she almost felt it, and, suppressing his own, pretended not to see the effects of her weakness and fading health. He forced a smile upon his careworn features, and strained a cheerfulness in his voice ill according with the feelings at his heart.

“Come, Grace,” said he, endeavouring to draw Ellen's attention from her absorbing thoughts, “sing one of your cheerful songs. " It will sound here quite as musical as in the fields and woods at home.”

« PředchozíPokračovat »