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JOHN BRIGHT. Speech at Birmingham Town Hall, April 28, 1859. Attributed to JOSEPH HUME by SIR CHARLES DILKE in the Morning Herald, Aug. 2, 1899. Probably said by WILLIAM IV to EARL GRAY, in an interview, Nov. 17, 1830. Found in H. B.'s Cartoons, No. 93, pub. Nov. 26, 1830. Also in a letter of PRINCESS LIEVEN, Nov., 1830. See WARREN'S Ten Thousand a Year. (Inscribed on the banner of Tittlebat Titmouse.) Referred to in MOLESWORTH's Hist. of the Reform Bill of 1832. P. 98.

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(See also IRVING)

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Government.

And the first thing I would do in my government, I would have nobody to control me, I would be absolute; and who but I: now, he that is absolute, can do what he likes; he that can do what he likes, can take his pleasure; he that can take his pleasure, can be content; and he that can be content, has no more to desire; so the matter's over.

CERVANTES-Don Quixote. Pt. I. Bk. IV. Ch. XXIII.

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Whatever was required to be done, the Circumlocution Office was beforehand with all the public departments in the art of perceiving how not to do it.

DICKENS-Little Dorrit. Bk. III. Ch. X.

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The country has, I think, made up its mind to close this career of plundering and blundering. BENJ. DISRAELI-Letter to LORD GREY DE WELTON. Oct., 1873.

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(See also BURTON)

The divine right of kings may have been a plea for feeble tyrants, but the divine right of government is the keystone of human progress, and without it governments sink into police, and a nation is degraded into a mob. BENJ. DISRAELI-Lothair. General Preface. (1870)

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A Conservative Government is an organized hypocrisy. BENJ. DISRAELI-Speech. March 17, 1845.

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Individualities may form communities, but it is institutions alone that can create a nation. BENJ. DISRAELI-Speech at Manchester. (1866)

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Resolv'd to ruin or to rule the state. DRYDEN-Absalom and Achitophel. L. 174.

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Pt. I.

For where's the State beneath the Firmament,
That doth excell the Bees for Government?
DU BARTAS-Divine Weekes and Workes.
First Week. Fifth Day. Pt. I.

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Shall we judge a country by the majority, or by the minority? By the minority, surely. EMERSON Conduct of Life. Considerations by the Way.

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(See also LINCOLN)

Fellow-citizens: Clouds and darkness are around Him; His pavilion is dark waters and thick clouds; justice and judgment are the establishment of His throne; mercy and truth shall go before His face! Fellow citizens! God reigns and the Government at Washington lives. JAMES A. GARFIELD Address. April, 1865. From the balcony of the New York Custom House to a crowd, excited by the news of President Lincoln's assassination.

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When constabulary duty's to be done A policeman's lot is not a happy one. W. S. GILBERT-Pirates of Penzance.

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Welche Regierung die beste sei? Diejenige die uns lehrt uns selbst zu regieren.

What government is the best? That which teaches us to govern ourselves. GOETHE-Sprüche in Prosa. III.

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For just experience tells, in every soil,
That those who think must govern those that

toil.

GOLDSMITH-The Traveller. L. 372.

(See also BYRON under LABOR)

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Of the various executive abilities, no one excited more anxious concern than that of placing the interests of our fellow-citizens in the hands of honest men, with understanding sufficient for their stations. No duty is at the same time more difficult to fulfill. The knowledge of character possessed by a single individual is of necessity limited. To seek out the best through the whole Union, we must resort to the information which from the best of men, acting disinterestedly and with the purest motives, is sometimes incorrect. THOMAS JEFFERSON-Letter to Elias Shipman

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and others of New Haven. July 12, 1801. Paraphrased by JOHN B. MCMASTER in his History of the People of the United States. II. 586. One sentence will undoubtedly be remembered till our republic ceases to exist. 'No duty the Executive had to perform was so trying,' he observed, 'as to put the right man in the right place.'

The trappings of a monarchy would set up an ordinary commonwealth.

SAMUEL JOHNSON-Life of Milton.

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Excise, a hateful tax levied upon commodities. SAMUEL JOHNSON-Definition of Excise in his Dictionary.

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What constitutes a state?

Men who their duties know,

But know their rights, and knowing, dare maintain.

And sovereign law, that state's collected will,
O'er thrones and globes elate,

Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.

SIR WILLIAM JONES-Ode in Imitation of Alcæus.

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The Americans equally detest the pageantry of a king and the supercilious hypocrisy of a bishop.

JUNIUS-Letter XXXV. Dec. 19, 1769.

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Salus populi suprema lex.

The safety of the State is the highest law. JUSTINIAN-Twelve Tables.

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That this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN Speech at Gettysburg. 1863. The phrase "of the people, for the people and by the people" is not original with Lincoln. There is a tradition that the phrase, "The Bible shall be for the government of the people, for the people and by the people," appears in the preface of the Wyclif Bible of 1384, or in the Here ford Bible, or in a pamphlet of the period treating of that version. See Notes and Queries, Feb. 12, 1916. P. 127. Albert Mathews, of Boston, examined the reprint of 1850 of the Wyclif Bible, and finds no reference to it. There is a preface to the Old and the New Testament, and a prologue to each book, probably written by John Purvey. Isaac Markens, of New York city, published a pamphlet on the Gettysburg address, showing comparisons with EVERETT'S Orations. Articles in the Dial, Oct. 25, 1917, by O. H. CARMICHAEL; and in the Outlook, July 12, 1913, by JESSE W. WEIK.

(See also ADAMS, LAMARTINE, MARSHALL,

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