Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub
[blocks in formation]

5

[blocks in formation]

Diis proximus ille est Quem ratio non ira movet: qui factor rependens Consilio punire potest.

He is next to the gods whom reason, and not passion, impels; and who, after weighing the facts, can measure the punishment with discretion. CLAUDINAUS-De Consulatu Malii Theodori

Panegyris. CCXXVII. 6 I stew all night in my own grease. COTTON–Virgil Travestie. P. 35. (Ed. 1807)

Fat enough to be stewed in their own liquor. FULLERHoly State and the Profane State. P. 396. (Ed. 1840)

(See also CHAUCER)

21

Quidquid multis peccatur inultum est.

The sins committed by many pass unpunished. LUCAN-Pharsalia. V. 260.

22

It were better for him that a mülstone were hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea.

Luke. XVII. 2.

7

.

23

Eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot.

Deuteronomy. XIX. 21.

The object of punishment is, prevention from evil; it never can be made impulsive to good. HORACE MANN-Lectures and Reports on Edu

cation. Lecture VII.

8

24

"Tis I that call, remember Milo's end, Wedged in that timber which he strove to rend. WENTWORTH DILLON-Essay on Translated

Verse. Ovid.

Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched.

Mark, IX. 44.

9

25

That is the bitterest of all,—to wear the yoke of our own wrong-doing. GEORGE ELIOTDaniel Deronda. Bk. V.

Ch. XXXVI.

Unrespited, unpitied, unrepriev'd.

MILTON-Paradise Lost. Bk. II. L. 185.

26

[blocks in formation]

1

He, who has committed a fault, is to be corrected both by advice and by force, kindly and harshly, and to be made better for himself as well as for another, not without chastisement, but without passion. SENECA--De Ira. I. 14.

13

Ay-down to the dust with them, slaves as they

are, From this hour, let the blood in their das

tardly veins, That shrunk at the first touch of Liberty's war,

Be wasted for tyrants, or stagnant in chains. MOORE—Lines on the Entry of the Austrians

into Naples. (1821) Die and be damned. THOMAS MORTIMER—Against the Calvinistic

doctrine of eternal punishment. 3 Æquo animo poenam, qui meruere, ferant.

Let those who have deserved their punishment, bear it patiently. OVIDAmorum. II. 7. 12.

2

Maxima est factæ injuriæ pæna, fecisse: nec quisquam gravius adficitur, quam qui ad supplicium pænitentiæ traditur.

The severest punishment a man can receive who has injured another, is to have committed the injury; and no man is more severely punished than he who is subject to the whip of his own repentance. SENECA-De Ira. III. 26.

14

Paucite paucarum diffundere crimen in omnes.

Do not lay on the multitude the blame that is due to a few. OVID--Ars Amatoria. III. 9.

5 Estque pati poenas quam meruisse minus.

It is less to suffer punishment than to deserve it. OVIDEpistolae Ex Ponto. I. 1. 62.

Nec ulla major pana nequitiæ est, quam quod sibi et suis displicet.

There is no greater punishment of wickedness than that it is dissatisfied with itself and its deeds. SENECA-Epistolae Ad Lucilium. XLII.

15

Sequitur superbos ultor a tergo deus.

An avenging God closely follows the haughty. SENECA-Hercules Furens. 385.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

He that spareth his rod hateth his son.
Proverbs. XIII. 24.

(See also LANGLAND, SKELTON, VENNING) 10 To kiss the rod. History of Reynard the Fox. WILLIAM Cax

TON's trans., printed by him. (1481)
ARBER's English Scholar's Library. Ch. XII.

(See also Two GENTLEMEN OF VERONA) Quod antecedit tempus, maxima venturi supplicii

pars est.

The time that precedes punishment is the severest part of it. SENECA-De Beneficiis. II. 5. Corrigendus est, qui peccet, et admonitione et vi, et molliter et aspere, meliorque tam sibi quam alii faciendus, non sine castigatione, sed sine ira.

11

22

There is nothynge that more dyspleaseth God Than from theyr children to spare the rod. SKELTON---Magnyfycence. L. 1,954.

(See also PROVERBS)

23

12

Punitis ingeniis, gliscit auctoritas.

When men of talents are punished, authority is strengthened. TACITUS-Annales. IV. 35.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

2

3

15

5

16

6

18

7

The art of quotation requires more delicacy Comme quelqu'un pourroit dire de moy, que in the practice than those conceive who can see j'ay seulement faict icy un amas de fleurs esnothing more in a quotation than an extract. trangieres, n'y ayant fourny du mien que le filet ISAAC D'ISRAELI—Curiosities of Literature. à les lier. Quotation.

As one might say of me at I have only

made here a collection of other people's flowOne may quote till one com piles.

ers, having provided nothing of my own but ISAAC D'ISRAELI—Curiosities of Literature. the cord to bind them together. Quotation.

MONTAIGNE-Essays. Bk. III. Ch. XII.

(See also ELIOT) The wisdom of the wise and the experience of ages may be preserved by QUOTATION.

I have seen books made of things ISAAC D'ISRAELI--Curiosities of Literature. neither studied nor ever understood. the Quotation.

author contenting himself for his own part, to

have cast the plot and projected the design of A book which hath been culled from the flow- it, and by his industry to have bound up the ers of all books.

fagot of unknown provisions; at least the ink GEORGE ELIOTThe Spanish Gypsy. Bk. II. and paper his own. This may be said to be a (See also MONTAIGNE)

buying or borrowing, and not a making or com

piling of a book. A great man quotes bravely, and will not draw on his invention when his memory serves him

MONTAIGNE—Essays. Bk. III. Ch. XII. with a word as good.

Nor suffers Horace more in wrong translations EMERSONLetters and Social Aims. Quotation and Originality.

By wits, than critics in as wrong quotations.

POPE-Essay on Criticism. Pt. III. L. 104.

17 By necessity, by proclivity, and by delight,

He ranged his tropes, and preached up patience, we quote. We quote not only books and prov

Backed his opinion with quotations. erbs, but arts, sciences, religion, customs, and

PRIORPaulo Purganti and his Wife. L. 143. laws; nay, we quote temples and houses, tables and chairs by imitation. EMERSONLetters and Social Aims. Quota

Always to verify your references.

Rev. DR. ROUTHto Dean Burgon. Nov. tion and Originality.

29, 1847. See VERY REV. JOHN BURGONNext to the originator of a good sentence is

Lives of Twenty Good Men. "Reference" the first quoter of it.

in ed. of 1891; "quotation" in earlier ed. EMERSONLetters and Social Aims. Quotation and Originality.

The little honesty existing among authors is (See also BAYLE, LOWELL)

to be seen in the outrageous way in which they

misquote from the writings of others. We are as much informed of a writer's genius SCHOPENHAUER—On Authorship. by what he selects as by what he originates. EMERSONLetters and Social Aimi. Quota- They had been at a great feast of ianguages, tion and Originality.

and stolen the scraps.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act V. Sc. 1. L. 39. Every quotation contributes something to the stability or enlargement of the language. The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

SAMUEL JOHNSONPreface to Dictionary. Merchant of Venice. "Act I. Sc. 3. L. 99.

Classical quotation is the parole of literary A forward critic often dupes us men all over the world.

With sham quotations peri hupsos, SAMUEL JOHNSONRemark to Wilkes. (1781) And if we have not read Longinus,

Will magisterially outshine us. C'est souvent hasarder un bon mot et vouloir Then, lest with Greek he over-run ye, le perdre que de le donner pour sien.

Procure the book for love or money, A good saying often runs the risk of being Translated from Bo:leau's translation, thrown away when quoted as the speaker's And quote quotation on quotation.

SWIFT/On Poetry. LA BRUYÈRE—Les Caractères. II.

I am but a gatherer and disposer of other 'Twas not an Age ago since most of our Books men's stuff. were nothing but Collections of Latin Quota- SIR HENRY WOTTONPreface to the Elements tions; there was not above a line or two of of Architecture. French in a Page. LA BRUYÈREThe Character or Manners of To patchwork learn'd quotations are allied, the Present Age. Ch. XV. Of the Pulpit. Both strive to make our poverty our pride.

YOUNG—Love of Fame. Satire I. Thou old the thought and oft exprest, 'Tis his at last who says it best.

Some, for renown, on scraps of learning dote, LOWELL-For an Autograph. St. 1.

And think they grow immortal as they quote. (See also EMERSON)

YOUNG—Love of Fame. Satire I. L. 89.

19

8

20

9

21

10

22

11

[ocr errors]

23

12

24

13

25

« PředchozíPokračovat »