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REPENTANCE

O ye powers that search The heart of man, and weigh his inmost thoughts, If I have done amiss, impute it not! The best may err, but you are good.

ADDISONCato. Act V. Sc. 4.

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Who God doth late and early pray
More of his Grace than Gifts to lend;
And entertains the harmless day
With a Religious Book or Friend.
SIR HENRY WOTTONThe Character of a

Happy Life. St. 5.
Religion's all. Descending from the skies
To wretched man, the goddess in her left
Holds out this world, and, in her right, the next.

YOUNG—Night Thoughts. Night IV. L. 550. But if man loses all, when life is lost, He lives a coward, or a fool expires.

D'uomo è il fallir, ma dal malvagio il buono
Scerne il dolor del fallo.

To err is human; but contrition felt for the crime distinguishes the virtuous from the wicked. ALFIERI—Rosmunda. III. 1.

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To sigh, yet not recede; to grieve, yet not repent! CRABBETales of the Hall. Bk. III. Boys at

School. Last line,

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When prodigals return great things are done.
A. Á. DOWTY-The Siliad. In BEETON'S

Christmas Annual. 1873.

It is never too late to turn from the errors of

our ways: He who repents of his sins is almost innocent. SENECA-Agamemnon. 242.

(See also HERBERT)

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I do not buy repentance at so heavy a cost as a thousand drachmæ. Aulus GELLIUS. Bk. I. Ch. VI. 6. Quoting

DEMOSTHENES to LAIS.
3
When iron scourge, and tort'ring hour

The bad affright, afflict the best.
GRAY-Ode to Adversity. Same phrase "the

torturing hour" in CAMPBELL-Pleasures of
Hope. Pt. I. Midsummer Night's Dream.
Act V. Sc. 1.

(See also MILTON) 4 Restore to God his due in tithe and time: A tithe purloin'd cankers the whole estate.

HERBERTThe Temple. The Church Porch.

What then? what rests? Try what repentance can: what can it not? Yet what can it when one cannot repent? O wretched state! O bosom black as death! O limed soul, that struggling to be free Art more engag'd!

Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 64.

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Well, I'll repent, and that suddenly, while I am in some liking; I shall be out of heart shortly, and then I shall have no strength to repent.

Henry IV. Pt. I. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 5.

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Under your good correction, I have seen,
When, after execution judgment hath
Repented o'er his doom.

Measure for Measure. Act II. Sc. 2. L. 10.

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And wet his grave with my repentant tears.

Richard III, Act I. Sc. 2. L. 216.

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Woman, amends may never come too late.
Thos. LODGE AND Robt. GREENE-A Looking

Glass for London and England.
God dropped a spark down into everyone,

And if we find and fan it to a blaze,
It'll spring up and glow, like like the sun,

And light the wandering out of stony ways.
MASEFIELD-Widow in the Bye Street. Pt. VI.

Cave ne quidquam incipias, quod post poniteat.

Take care not to begin anything of which you may repent. SYRUS-Maxims.

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Velox consilium sequitur pænitentia.

Repentance follows hasty counsels. SYRUS-Maxims.

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When the scourge Inexorable, and the torturing hour Calls us to penance. MILTON-Paradise Lost. Bk. II. L. 90.

(See also GRAY)

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He (Cato) used to say that in all his life he never repented but of three things. The first was that he had trusted a woman with a secret; the second that he had gone by sea when he might have gone by land; and the third, that he had passed one day without having a will by him. PLUTARCH-Life of Cato. Vol. II. P. 495.

LANGHORNE's trans. Same in SIMPLICIUS-
Commentary on the Enchiridion of EPICTE-
TUS. Ch. IX. P. 52. (Ed. 1670)

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REPUTATION (See also NAME) It is a maxim with me that do man was ever written out of reputation but by himself. RICHARD BENTLEY-MONK's Life of Bentley. Vol. I. Ch. VI.

(See also EMERSON)

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And reputation bleeds in ev'ry word.

CHURCHILL-Apology.

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Negligere quid de se quisque sentiat, non solum arrogantis est, sed etiam omnino dissoluti.

To disregard what the world thinks of us is not only arrogant but utterly shameless. CICERODe Officiis. 1. 28.

In various talk th' instructive hours they past,
Who gave the ball, or paid the visit last;
One speaks the glory of the British queen,
And one describes a charming Indian screen;
A third interprets motions, looks, and eyes;
At every word a reputation dies.
POPE-Rape of the Lock. Pt. III. L. 11. (This

stanza not found in his printed works.)
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Das Aergste weiss die Welt von mir, und ich
Kann sagen, ich bin besser als mein Ruf.

The worst of me is known, and I can say that I am better than the reputation I bear. SCHILLER-Marie Stuart. III. 4. 208.

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No book was ever written down by any but itself. EMERSON—Spiritual Laws.

(See also BENTLEY) Nemo me lacrymis decoret, nec funera fletu. Faxit cur? Volito vivu' per ora virum.

Let no one honour me with tears, or bury me with lamentation. Why? Because I fly hither and thither, living in the mouths of men.

I have offended reputation,
A most unnoble swerving.

Antony and Cleopatra. Act III. Sc. 11. L. 49.

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O, I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial.

Othello. Act II. Sc. 3. 1. 262.

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Convey a libel in a frown.
And wink a reputation down!

SWIFT- Journal of a Modern Lady. L. 185.

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It seem'd so hard at first, mother, to leave the

blessed sun, And now it seems as hard to stay-and yet His

will be done! But still I think it can't be long before I find re

lease; And that good man, the clergynan, bas told me

words of peace. TENNYSONThe May-Queen. Conclusion, St. 3.

RESOLUTION

Videlicit, That each man swore to do his best To damn and perjure all the rest.

BUTLERHudibras. Pt. I. Canto II. L. 630.

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Give what thou canst, without thee we are poor; And with thee rich, take what thou wilt away.

COWPERThe Task. Bk. V. Last lines.

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I am in earnest-I will not equivocate I will not excuse I will not retreat a single inch AND I WILL BE HEARD. WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON-Salutatory of the

Liberator. Vol. I. No, 1. Jan. 1, 1831.

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Dare to look up to God and say, Deal with me in the future as Thou wilt; I am of the same mind as Thou art; I am Thine; I refuse nothing that pleases Thee; lead me where Thou wilt; clothe me in any dress Thou choosest.

EPICTETUS-Discourses. Bk. II. Ch. XVI.

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I will be as harsh as truth and as uncompromising as justice. WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON-Salutatory of the

Liberator. Vol. I. No. 1. Jan. 1, 1831. Nor cast one longing, ling'ring look behind.

GRAY-Elegy in a Country Churchyard. St. 22.

In truth there is no such thing in man's nature as a settled and full resolve either for good or evil, except at the very moment of execution. HAWTHORNE Twice - Told Tales. Fancy's

Show Box.

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To will what God doth will, that is the only

science That gives us any rest. MALHERBE-Consolation. St. 7. LONGFEL

Low's trans.

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That's best Which God sends. 'Twas His will: it is mine. OWEN MEREDITH (Lord Lytton)-Lucile. Pt.

II. Canto VI. St. 29. 12 The pious farmer, who ne'er misses pray'rs,

With patience suffers unexpected rain; He blesses Heav'n for what its bounty spares,

And sees, resign'd, a crop of blighted grain. But, spite of sermons, farmers would blaspheme, If a star fell to set their thatch on flame. LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGUE-Poem.

Written Oct., 1736.

Hast thou attempted greatnesse?

Then go on;
Back-turning slackens resolution.
HERRICKRegression Spoils Resolution.

For when two
Join in the same adventure, one perceives
Before the other how they ought to act;
While one alone, however prompt, resolves
More tardily and with a weaker will.
HOMER-Iliad. Bk. X. L. 257. BRYANT'S

trans.

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Life's race well run,
Life's work well done,
Life's victory won,

Now cometh rest.
DR. EDWARD HAZEN PARKERFuneral Ode

on President Garfield. Claimed for him by his brother in Notes and Queries, May 25, 1901. P. 406. Claimed by Mrs. JOHN MILLS, for JOHN Mills of Manchester, 1878. Appears in the Life of John Mills with account of origin. See Notes and Queries. Ser. 9. Vol. IV. P. 167. Also Vol. VII. P. 406.

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Silken rest Tie all thy cares up! BEAUMONT AND FLETCHERFour Plays in

One. Sc. 4. Triumph of Love. 7 0! quid solutis est beatius curis! Cum mens onus reponit, ac peregrino Labore fessi venimus larem ad nostrum Desideratoque acquiescimus lecto. Hoc est, quod unum est pro laboribus tantis.

0, what is more sweet than when the mind, set free from care, lays its burden down; and, when spent with distant travel, we come back to our home, and rest our limbs on the wishedfor bed? This, this alone, repays such toils as these! CATULLUS—Carmina. 31. 7.

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Absence of occupation is not rest;
A mind quite vacant is a mind distress'd.

COWPER—Retirement. L. 623.

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Who, with a body filled and vacant mind,
Gets him to rest, cramm'd with distressful bread.

Henry V. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 286.

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Sleepe after toyle, port after stormie seas,
Ease after warre, death after life, does greatly

please. SPENSER-Facrie Queene. Bk. I. Canto IX.

St. 40.

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Arcum intensio frangit, animum remissio.

Straining breaks the bow, and relaxation relieves the mind. SYRUS-Maxims.

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And rest, that strengthens unto virtuous deeds,
Is one with Prayer.
BAYARD TAYLORTemptation of Hassan Ben

Khaled. St. 4.

GOETHE-Ein Gleiches.

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