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Multa petentibus
Desunt multa.
Bene est, cui Deus obtulit
Parca, quod satis est manu.

Those who seek for much are left in want of much. Happy is he to whom God has given, with sparing hand, as much as is enough. HORACE—Carmina. Bk. III. 16. 42.

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Men are more satirical from vanity than from malice.

LA ROCHEFOUCAULDMaxims. No. 508.

9 Satire should, like a polished razor keen, Wound with a touch that's scarcely felt or seen. Thine is an oyster knife, that hacks and hews; The rage but not the talent to abuse. LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGUE—To the

Imitator of the First Satire of Horace. (Pope.) I wear my Pen as others do their Sword. To each affronting sot I meet, the word Is Satisfaction: straight to thrusts I go, And pointed satire runs him through and through.

JOHN OLDHAM-Satire upon a Printer. L. 35.

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Sed tacitus pasci si posset corvus, haberet
Plus dapis, et rixæ multo minus invidiæque.

If the crow had been satisfied to eat his prey in silence, he would have had more meat and less quarreling and envy. HORACE-Epistles. I. 17. 50.

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Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer; Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike, Just hint a fault, and hesitate dislike;

Les délicats sont malheureux,
Rien ne saurait les satisfaire.

The fastidious are unfortunate: nothing can satisfy them. LA FONTAINEFables. II. 1.

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Science is organised knowledge.

SPENCER-Education. Ch. II.

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Science when well digested is nothing but good sense and reason. STANISLAUS (King of Poland)-Maxims. No.

43.

Only a few industrious Scots perhaps, who indeed are dispersed over the face of the whole earth. But as for them, there are no greater friends to Englishmen and England, when they are out on't, in the world, than they are. And for my own part, I would a hundred thousand of them were there (Virginia) for we are all one countrymen now, ye know, and we should find ten times more comfort of them there than we do here. CHAPMAN—Eastward Ho. Act III. Sc. 2.

Written by CHAPMAN, JONSON, MARSTON. JAMES I was offended at the reflexion on Scotchmen and the authors were threatened with imprisonment. Extract now found only in a few editions.

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The Scots are poor, cries surly English pride;
True is the charge, nor by then selves denied.
Are they not then in strictest reason clear,
Who wisely come to mend their fortunes here?

CHURCHILL-Prophecy of Famine. L. 195.

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The noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees is the high-road that leads him to England. SAMUEL JOHNSONBoswell's Life of Johnson.

Vol. II. Ch. V. 1763.

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Ex quovis ligno non fit Mercurius.

A Mercury is not made out of any block of wood. Quoted by APPULEIUS as a saying of PYTHAG

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ORAS.

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Vainly the fowler's eye

Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong, As, darkly painted on the crimson sky,

Thy figure floats along.
BRYANT-Toa Water Fowl.

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Up and down! Up and down!
From the base of the wave to the billow's crown;
And amidst the flashing and feathery foam
The Stormy Petrel finds a home,-
A home, if such a place may be,
For her who lives on the wide, wide sea,
On the craggy ice, in the frozen air,
And only seeketh her rocky lair
To warm her young and to teach them spring
At once o'er the waves on their stormy wing!

BARRY CORNWALL-The Stormy Petrel.

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In sculpture did ever anybody call the Apollo a fancy piece? Or say of the Laocoon how it might be made different? A masterpiece of art has in the mind a fixed place in the chain of being, as much as a plant or a crystal.

EMERSON—Society and Solitude. Art.

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Ex pede Herculem.

From the feet, Hercules.
HERODOTUS. Bk. IV. Sec. LXXXII. Plu-

TARCH. As quoted by AULUS GELLIUS. I.

1. DIOGENES. V. 15. 7 Sculpture is more divine, and more like Nature, That fashions all her works in high relief, And that is Sculpture. This vast ball, the Earth, Was moulded out of clay, and baked in fire; Men, women, and all animals that breathe Are statues, and not paintings.

LONGFELLOW-Michael Angelo. Pt. III. 5.

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Between two seas the sea-bird's wing makes halt,
Wind-weary; while with lifting head he waits
For breath to reinspire him from the gates
That open still toward sunrise on the vault
High-domed of morning.
SWINBURNE-Songs of the Spring Tides. In-

troductory lines to Birthday Ode to Victor
Hugo.

SEASONS (UNCLASSIFIED)
Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee,
Whether the summer clothe the general earth
With greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing
Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch
Of mossy apple-tree, while the nigh thatch
Smokes in the sunthaw; whether the eve-drops

fall,
Heard only in the trances of the blast,
Or if the secret ministry of frost
Shall hang them up in silent icicles,
Quietly shining to the quiet moon.

COLERIDGE-Frost at Midnight.

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Sculpture is more than painting. It is greater To raise the dead to life than to create Phantoms that seem to live.

LONGFELLOWMichael Angelo. Pt. III. 5.

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And the cold marble leapt to life a God.

H. H. MILMANThe Belvedere Apollo. The Paphian Queen to Cnidos made repair Across the tide to see her image there: Then looking up and round the prospect wide, When did Praxiteles see me thus? she cried.

PLATO. In Greek Anthology.

Our seasons have no fixed returns,

Without our will they come and go; At noon our sudden summer burns,

Ere sunset all is snow.
LOWELLTo

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Then marble, soften'd into life, grew warm.

POPE—Second Book of Horace. Ep. I. L. 146.

The sculptor does not work for the anatomist, but for the common observer of life and nature.

RUSKIN--True and Beautiful. Sculpture.

Autumn to winter, winter into spring,

pring into summer, summer into fall,So rolls the changing year, and so we change; Motion so swift, we know not that we move.

D. M. MULOCK-Immutable.

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