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Where nature's end of language is declined,
And men talk only to conceal the mind.
YOUNG-Love of Fame. Satire II. L. 207.

Same idea in St. AUGUSTINE—Enchiridion
ad Laurentium. HOMER-Iliad. IX. 313.
Traced from GOLDSMITH to BUTLER;
YOUNG to SOUTH.

(See also VOLTAIRE)

Some who are far from atheists, may make themselves merry with that conceit of thousands of spirits dancing at once upon a needle's point. CUDWORTH-True Intellectual System of the

Universe. Vol. III. P. 497. Ed. 1829.
Isaac D'ISRAELI in Curiosities of Literature.
Quodlibets, quotes from AQUINAS, “How
many angels can dance on the point of a
very fine needle without jostling each other.”
The idea, not the words, are in AQUINAS-
Summa and Sentences. Credited also to
BERNARDO DE CARPINO and ALAGONA.

(See also ADDISON)

SPICE

Umbellularia Californica The Spice-Tree lives in the garden green,

Beside it the fountain flows; And a fair Bird sits the boughs between,

And sings his melodious woes.

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A Corpse or a Ghost- I'd sooner be one or t'other, square and fair, than a Ghost in a Corpse, which is my feelins at present. WILLIAM DE MORGAN-Joseph Vance. Ch.

XXXIX.

That out-bound stem has branches three;

On each a thousand blossoms grow;
And old as aught of time can be,

The root stands fast in the rocks below.
JOHN STERLINGThe Spice-Tree. Sts. 1 and 3.

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I am the spirit of the morning sea,

I am the awakening and the glad surprise. R. W. GILDER— Ode.

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15 Ich bin der Geist stets verneint.

I am the Spirit that denies.
GOETHE-Faust. I. 3. 163.

from me,

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Aërial spirits, by great Jove design'd
To be on earth the guardians of mankind:
Invisible to mortal eyes they go,
And mark our actions, good or bad, below:
The immortal spies with watchful care preside,
And thrice ten thousand round their charges

glide:
They can reward with glory or with gold,
A power they by Divine permission hold.
HESIOD—Works and Days. L. 164.

(See also MILTON, POPE)

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The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.

Matthew. XXVI. 41.

Or (almost) like a Spider, who, confin'd
In her Web's centre, shakt with every winde,
Moves in an instant, if the buzzing Flie
Stir but a string of her Lawn Canopie.
Du BARTAS Divine Weekes and Workes. First

Week. Sixth Day. L. 998.

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Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. MILTONParadise Lost. Bk. IV. L. 678.

(See also HESIOD)

"Will you walk into my parlour?"

Said a spider to a fly;
“ 'Tis the prettiest little parlour

That ever you did spy!'
Mary HOWITT—The Spider and the Fly.

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Teloque animus præstantior omni.

A spirit superior to every weapon. OVID—Metamorphoses. III. 54.

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The spider's touch, how exquisitely fine! Feels at each thread, and lives along the line.

POPE-Essay on Man. Ep. I, L, 217,

Ornament of a meek and quiet spirit.

I Peter. III. 4,

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SPRING

SPRING

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When Spring unlocks the flowers to paint the Thus came the lovely spring with a rush of laughing soil.

blossoins and music, BISHOP HEBER-Hymn for Seventh Sunday Flooding the earth with flowers, and the air with after Trinity.

melodies vernal.

LONGFELLOW-Tales of a Wayside Inn. Pt. The spring's already at the gate

III. The Theologian's Tale. Elizabeth.
With looks my care beguiling;
The country round appeareth straight

The holy spirit of the Spring
A flower-garden smiling.

Is working silently. HEINE-Book of Songs. Catherine. No. 6.

GEORGE MacDONALDSongs of the Spring

Days. Pt. II. The beauteous eyes of the spring's fair night Awake! the morning shines, and the fresh field With comfort are downward gazing.

Calls us; we lose the prime, to mark how spring HEINE-Book of Songs. New Spring. No. 3. Our tended plants, how blows the citron grove,

What drops the myrrh, and what the balmy reed: I come, I come! ye have called me long,

How nature paints her colours, how the
I come o'er the mountain with light and song: Sits on the bloom, extracting liquid sweet.
Ye may trace my step o'er the wakening earth,

MILTON— Paradise Lost. Bk. V. L. 20.
By the winds which tell of the violet's birth,
By the primrose-stars in the shadowy grass, On many a green branch swinging,
By the green leaves, opening as I pass.

Little birdlets singing FELICIA D. HEMANS-Voice of Spring.

Warble sweet notes in the air.

Flowers fair

There I found.
Sweet Spring, full of sweet dayes and roses,
A box where sweets compacted lie,

Green spread the meadow all around.
My musick shows ye have your closes,

NITHART—Spring-Song. Trans. in The MinneAnd all must die.

singer of Germany. HERBERT-The Church. Vertue. St. 3.

Yet Ah, that Spring should vanish with the Rose.

That Youth's sweet-scented manuscript should For surely in the blind deep-buried roots

close! Of all men's souls to-day

The Nightingale that in the branches sang A secret quiver shoots.

Ah whence and whither flown again, who knows? RICHARD HOVEY-Spring.

OMAR KHAYYAMRubaiyat. FitzGERALD'S

Trans. St. 96. They know who keep a broken tryst,

17 Till something from the Spring be missed Gentle Spring!--in sunshine clad, We have not truly known the Spring.

Well dost thou thy power display! ROBERT UNDERWOOD JOHNSONThe Wistful

For Winter maketh the light heart sad, Days.

And thou,-thou makest the sad heart gay.

CHARLES D'ORLÉANS-Spring. LONGFELLOW's All flowers of Spring are not May's own;

trans.
The crocus cannot often kiss her;
The snow-drop, ere she comes, has flown:- Hark! the hours are softly calling
The earliest violets always miss her.

Bidding Spring arise,
LUCY LARCOMThe Sister Months.

To listen to the rain-drops falling

From the cloudy skies, And softly came the fair young queen

To listen to Earth's weary voices,

Louder every day,
O'er mountain, dale, and dell;
And where her golden light was seen

Bidding her no longer linger

On her charm'd way;
An emerald shadow fell.
The good-wife oped the window wide,

But hasten to her task of beauty
The good-man spanned his plough;

Scarcely yet begun. 'Tis time to run, 'tis time to ride,

ADELAIDE A. PROCTER—Spring.
For Spring is with us now.
LELAND—Spring.

I wonder if the sap is stirring yet,

If wintry birds are dreaming of a mate, 10

If frozen snowdrops feel as yet the sun, The lovely town was white with apple-blooms, And crocus fires are kindling one by one. And the great elms o'erhead

CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTIThe First Spring Dark shadows wove on their aerial looms,

Day. St. 1.
Shot through with golden thread.
LONGFELLOWHauthorne. St. 2.

There is no time like Spring,

When life's alive in everything, Came the Spring with all its splendor,

Before new nest!ings sing, All its hirds and all its blossoms,

Before cleft swallows speed their journey back All its flowers, and leaves, and grasses.

Along the trackless track. LONGFELLOW-Hiawatha. It. XXI. L. 109. CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI-Spring. St. 3.

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In the Spring a livelier iris changes on the bur

nish'd dove; In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns

to thoughts of love. TENNYSONLocksley Hall. St. 9.

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For, lo! the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; the flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land.

The Song of Solomon. II. 11, 12.
So forth issew'd the Seasons of the yeare:

First, lusty Spring, all dight in leaves of flowres That freshly budded and new bloomes did beare, In which a thousand birds had built their

bowres That sweetly sung to call forth paramours; And in his hand a javelin he did beare,

And on his head (as fit for warlike stoures) A guilt, engraven morion he did weare: That, as some did him love, so others did him

feare. SPENSERFaerie Queene. Bk. VII. Canto

VII. Legend of Constancie. St. 28. Now the hedged meads renew Rustic odor, smiling hue, And the clean air shines and twinkles as the

world goes wheeling through; And my heart springs up anew, Bright and confident and true, And my old love comes to meet me in the dawn

ing and the dew. STEVENSONPoem written in 1876.

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'Tis spring-time on the eastern hills!
Like torrents gush the summer rills;
Through winter's moss and dry dead leaves
The bladed grass revives and lives,
Pushes the mouldering waste away,
And glimpses to the April day.

WHITTIER—Mogg Megone. Pt. III.

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And all the woods are alive with the murmur

and sound of spring, And the rosebud breaks into pink on the

climbing briar, And the crocus bed is a quivering moon of fire Girdled round with the belt of an amethyst ring.

Oscar Wilde-Magdalen Walks.

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The Spring is here—the delicate footed May,

With its slight fingers full of leaves and flowers, And with it comes a thirst to be away,

In lovelier scenes to pass these sweeter hours. N. P. WILLIS Spring.

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STAGE, THE (See ACTING)

It is the season now to go
About the country high and low,
Among the lilacs hand in hand,
And two by two in fairyland.
STEVENSON—Underwoods. It is the Season

Now to Go.
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O tender time that love thinks long to see,

Sweet foot of Spring that with her footfall sows

Late snow-like flowery leavings of the snows, Be not too long irresolute to be; O mother-month, where have they hidden thee?

SWINBURNE-A Vision of Spring in Winter. Once more the Heavenly Power

Makes all things new,
And domes the red-plough'd hills

With loving blue;
The blackbirds have their wills,
The throstles too.

TENNYSON-Early Spring.
The bee buzz'd up in the heat,
"I am faint for your honey, my sweet.”

The flower said, “Take it, my dear,
For now is the Spring of the year.
So come, come!”

“Hum!"
And the bee buzz'd down from the heat.

TENNYSONThe Forester. Act IV. Sc. 1.

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Surely the stars are images of love.
Bailey-Festus. Sc. Garden and Bower by th"

Sea.

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