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3&4 Will. 4. c. 91. An Act consolidating and The whole of sect.

amending the laws relating 37.
to Jurors and Juries in Ire-
land.

(Printed from official edition.)

(3.) CONVENTION

BETWEEN HER MAJESTY AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA RELATIVE TO NATURALIZATION, SIGNED

AT LONDON,

MAY 13, 1870.

[Ratifications exchanged at London, August 10, 1870.]

Her Majesty, the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and the President of the United States of America, being desirous to regulate the citizenship of British subjects who have emigrated or who may emigrate from the British dominions to the United States of America, and of citizens of the United States of America who have emigrated or who may emigrate from the United States of America to the British dominions, have resolved to conclude a Convention for that purpose, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say,

&c.

ARTICLE I.

British subjects who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized according to law within the United States of America as citizens thereof, shall, subject to the provisions of Article II, be held by Great Britain to be in all respects and for all purposes citizens of the United States, and shall be treated as such by Great Britain.

Reciprocally : citizens of the United States of America who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized according to law within the British dominions as British subjects, shall, subject to the provisions of Article II, be held by the United States to be in all respects and for all purposes British subjects, and shall be treated as such by the United States.

ARTICLE II.

Such British subjects as aforesaid who have become and are natu• ralized as citizens within the United States, shall be at liberty to renounce their naturalization and to resume their British nationality, provided that such renunciation be publicly declared within two years after the twelfth day of May, 1870.

Such citizens of the United States as aforesaid who have become and are naturalized within the dominions of her Britannic Majesty as British subjects, shall be at liberty to renounce their naturalization and to resume their nationality as citizens of the United States, provided that such renunciation be publicly declared within two years after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Convention.

The manner in which this renunciation may be made and publicly declared shall be agreed upon by the Governments of the respective countries.

ARTICLE III.

If any such British subject as aforesaid, naturalized in the United States, should renew his residence within the dominions of Her Britannic Majesty, Her Majesty's Government may, on his own application, and on such conditions as that Government may think fit to impose, readmit him to the character and privileges of a British subject, and the United States shall not, in that case, claim him as a citizen of the United States on account of his former naturalization.

In the same manner, if any such citizen of the United States as aforesaid, naturalized within the dominions of Her Britannic Majesty, should renew his residence in the United States, the United States' Government may, on his own application, and on such conditions as that Government may think fit to impose, re-admit him to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States, and Great Britain shall not, in that case, claim him as a British subject on account of his former naturalization.

(This convention, unlike all others respecting naturalization, concluded by the United States, contains no stipulations respecting its duration.)

(4.) CONVENTION

BETWEEN HER MAJESTY AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

SUPPLEMENTARY TO THE CONVENTION OF MAY 13, 1870,
RESPECTING NATURALIZATION.-SIGNED AT WASHINGTON,
FEBRUARY 23, 1871.

(Ratifications exchanged at Washington, May 4, 1871.) Whereas by the second article of the Convention between Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the United States of America, for regulating the citizenship of subjects and citizens of the contracting parties who have emigrated or may emigrate from the dominions of the one to those of the other party, signed at London on the 13th of May, 1870, it was stipulated that the manner in which the renunciation by such subjects and citizens of their naturalization, and the resumption of their native allegiance, may be made and publicly declared, should be agreed upon by the governments of the respective countries; Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and the President of the United States of America, for the purpose of effecting such agreement, have resolved to conclude a Supplemental Convention, and have named as their plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

ARTICLE I. Any person being originally a citizen of the United States, who had, previously to May 13, 1870, been naturalized as a British subject, may at any time before August 10, 1872, and any British subject who, at the date first aforesaid, had been naturalized as a citizen within the United States, may, at any time before May 12, 1872, publicly declare his renunciation of such naturalization by subscribing an instrument in writing, substantially in the form hereunto appended, and designated as Annex A.

Such renunciation, by an original citizen of the United States, of British nationality, shall, within the territories and jurisdiction of the United States, be made in duplicate, in the presence of any court authorized by law for the time being to admit aliens to naturalization, or before the clerk or prothonotary of any such court; if the declarant be beyond the territories of the United States, it shall be made in duplicate, before any diplomatic or consular officer of the United States. One of such duplicates shall remain of record in the custody of the court or officer in whose presence it was made; the other shall be, without delay, transmitted to the Department of State.

Such renunciation, if declared by an original British subject, of his acquired nationality as a citizen of the United States, shall, if the declarant be in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, be made in duplicate, in the presence of a justice of the peace; if elsewhere in Her Britannic Majesty's dominions, in triplicate, in the presence of any judge of civil or criminal jurisdiction, of any justice of the peace, or of any other officer for the time being authorized by law, in the place in which the declarant is, to administer an oath for any judicial or other legal purpose; if out of Her Majesty's dominions, in triplicate, in the presence of any officer in the diplomatic and consular service of Her Majesty.

ARTICLE II. The contracting parties hereby engage to communicate each to the other, from time to time, lists of the persons who, within their respective dominions and territories, or before their diplomatic and consular officers, have declared their renunciation of naturalization, with the dates and places of making such declarations, and such information as to the abode of the declarants, and the times and places of their naturalization, as they may have furnished.

ANNEX (A). I, A. B., of (insert abode), being originally a citizen of the United States of America (or a British subject), and having become naturalized within the dominions of Her Britannic Majesty as a British subject (or as a citizen within the United States of America), do hereby renounce my naturalization as a British subject (or citizen of the United States); and declare that it is my desire to resume my naturalization as a citizen of the United States (or British subject).

(Signed) Made and subscribed before me,

in (insert country or subdivision, and state, province, colony, legation, or consulate), this

187 (Signed)

Justice of the Peace (or other title). (These conventions are printed from British official documents. They will also be found in Treaties United States, 1870–1, p. 399 ; ib. 1871, p. 15.)

A. B.

day of

E. F.,

V.

CONVENTION

BETWEEN

THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE AUSTRO

HUNGARIAN MONARCHY.-NATURALIZATION. -SIGNED SEPTEMBER 20, 1870; RATIFIED MARCH 24, 1871; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED JULY 14, 1871 ; PROCLAIMED AUGUST 1, 1871.

The President of the United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of Austria, King of Bohemia, etc., and Apostolic King of Hungary, led by the wish to regulate the citizenship of those persons who emigrate from the United States of America to the territories of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, and from the AustroHungarian Monarchy to the United States of America, have resolved to treat on this subject, and have for that purpose appointed Plenipotentiaries to conclude a Convention, that is to say, &c. :

ARTICLE I. Citizens of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy who have resided in the United States of America uninterruptedly at least five years, and during such residence have become naturalized citizens of the United States, shall be held by the government of Austria and Hungary to be American citizens, and shall be treated as such.

Reciprocally: citizens of the United States of America who have resided in the territories of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy uninterruptedly at least five years, and during such residence have become naturalized citizens of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, shall be held by the United States to be citizens of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, and shall be treated as such.

The declaration of an intention to become a citizen of the one or the other country has not for either party the effect of naturalization.

ARTICLE II.

A naturalized citizen of the one party, on return to the territory of the other party, remains liable to trial and punishment for an action punishable by the laws of his original country committed before his emigration, saving always the limitation established by the laws of his original country, and any other remission of liability to punishment.

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