Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

.

HOOD KELLOGG, Rev. ELIJAH . KING, CLARENCE KING, REV. THOMAS STARR KNOWLES, REV. JAMES SHERIDAN LINGARD. LLOYD, ELIZABETH LOCKHART LONGFELLOW, HENRY W. LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL MACAULAY. MACKAY, CHARLES , MANN, HORACE Milton . MITFORD, Miss. PARKER, REV. THEODORE PIERPONT, REV. JOHN PRIEST, Miss. QUINCY, JOSIAH . READ, THOMAS B.. SCOTT, SIR WALTER SEWARD, WILLIAM H. SHAKESPEARE SCHURZ, CARL SMITH, GOLDWIN SMITH, HORACE SMITH, SYDNEY SOUTHEY, MRS. SPARKS, REV. JARED . SPRAGUE, CHARLES STEPHENS, MRS. SUMNER, CHARLES . SWAIN, Rev. LEONARD TAYLOR, BAYARD TENNYSON, ALFRED WEBSTER, DANIEL . WHIPPLE, E. P. . WHITTIER, John G. WILLIAMS, Rev. W. R. WINTHROP, ROBERT C. WORDSWORTH

373 402 363

225 322, 325

243 434

433 133, 206, 277 129, 256, 305, 391, 441

248, 329

159 285, 345

395 408

436 162, 267, 440

280 376

357 139, 143, 164

258 147, 262, 341

117 438 220 211 401 201 337

112 268, 398, 427

290

394

199, 214 136, 177, 178, 275

204, 410 253, 307

379 212 317

.

INTRODUCTION.

THE VOICE IN ELOCUTION.

“There is in souls a sympathy with sounds."

COWPER.
FORCE.

Of the fourteen vowel sounds in our language, some require for their enunciation more force than others. Thus the sound of a as in ah, and that of o as in oh, are louder than that of oo in foot or i in fit. So the diphthong sound ou as in growl is a little stronger than that of u as in tune. A strong sound is naturally fit to express strength; a weak one to express weakness. *

A similar difference exists among the twenty-two consonants. Thus the sounds of r, gr, h, str, thr, are strong. This fact will be perceptible in the articulation of rave, rail, rend, rip, rear, roar, grapple, grasp, grind, gripe, groan, growl, harsh, haul, horrid, strain, strangle, strive, stress, strike, struggle, thrash, thrill, throw, throb, thrust, throttle. But the sound of l is weak; as in lave, lay, lick, linger, lisp, loll, love, lull,

* The difference in the fitness of vowels to express loud or soft sounds is seen in comparing words whose consonants are the same or nearly so. The stronger vowel usually expresses the louder sound. Compare croak, crack, and the obsolete crick ; squall and squeal ; snore and sneer ; snort, snuff, and sniff ; snarl and snivel. Or the strong vowel expresses greater force. Compare spout and spit, groan and grin, strong and string, master and mistress, thank and think, glare and glitter. In some other languages this difference is more perceptible than in ours. In some of the languages of the Scythian stock, as in the Magyar and the Turkish, the heavy vowels, a, o, u, are called masculine ; the light, e, i, o, u, feminine. In the Mantchoo, we find ama meaning father, eme mother; kaka is male, keke female; amka father-in-law, emke mother-in-law; kankan a strong spirit, kenken a feeble

« PředchozíPokračovat »