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bourhood, a few miles north of Ashford—Glen Dunran. I heights about Wicklow afford some fine sea views; and It is two miles long, narrow, and finely wooded. It the bold bluff promontory of Wicklow Head, with the must not be compared with the more famous one we lighthouses, is a feature that a painter of coast scenery have been visiting, but it is a lovely spot.

would stay to sketch. All along here, and round to Close by Ashford is the classic demesne of Rosanna, Wicklow, the coast is a drifting sandbank; as dreary the property of D. Tighe, Esq. Here it was that the and unhappy-looking as a coast-line well can be. charming Irish poetess, Mrs. Tighe, wrote the beautiful And the country inland between these towns is poem of Psyche.' The grounds are especially famous hardly better. Much of it is a boggy was e, unfor their magnificent trees. These impart to it a state- drained, and profitless, except where peat is dug. liness such as few of the Irish parks possess, and not And the people are as poor as the land. Miserable many English ones surpass. It is said in Curry's clay cabins, with only a hole in the badly-thatched

Handbook for Ireland,' that “this well-wooded de- roof for a chimney-damp, rotten-looking places-are mesne contains among its venerable trees some of the the ordinary dwellings; and nothing about them gives finest old oaks and Spanish chestnuts in the country.” a sign of there being any greater prosperity than the Many of them would dignify one of the finest parks in cabins themselves would suggest. Even the pig is Kent. Along the road which passes the demesne they looked for in vain. There are some better places here form an almost matchless avenue. One noble patriarch and there, but the district generally appears thoroughly stands out quite apart in the road, -to the no small poverty-stricken. danger, as it would appear, of coaches travelling that Arklow is now a much more important town than way, but certainly adding much to the picturesque Wicklow. It is the most populous town in the county. beauty of this bit of road.

At the census of 1841 there were 6,237 inhabitants in Before quitting this locality, let us add that the the parish of Arklow, of whom 3,254 resided in the river Vartry, after it leaves the Devil's Glen, and being town. It is situated on the estuary of the Avoca, at the joined by two or three small affluents, expands into a southern extremity of the county. Between the town good-sized stream, passes by Ashford and Newrath, and the sea there is a wide strip of coast, a drifting and soon approaches the sea. But here a sandbank sandy waste, only relieved by the “dunes,” or hillocks has formed and prevented its egress : the river, in con- of loose shifting sand. The haven is in good part sequence, has expanded to the right and left, making a filled with sand, and of little use except for boats and narrow lagoon, two miles in length, which is known as very light vessels. Along the creek is a gathering of Broad Lough, at the southern end of which, by the poor clay cabins, called the Fishery. The town itself, town of Wicklow, a mile and a half below its original or at least the business part of it, stretches up a slight outlet, it flows into the sea. The sandbank is called, ascent nearly parallel to the river, but not close to it. the Marragh.

The river is crossed by a long rude bridge of eighteen arches, and on the Wicklow side of it there are a few

poor-houses. WICKLOW: ARKLOW.

Arklow has at different times been the scene of some Wicklow, though the county and assize-town, is a stout contests. The castle, the chief object of the asmiserable-looking place. It has a rather considerable sailants, was built in the reign of John, and was discorn-trade, and a few small trading vessels; but else mantled by Oliver Cromwell. The last time Arklow it appears to have little commerce of any kind, and was made a battle-field was as late as 1795. The to be altogether a neglected locality. The town and the “rebel army,” under the guidance and command of people seem alike disheartened : even the fishery is Father Murphy, had surprised and taken Wexford, not looked after. There is not much to be seen in the and now, above 20,000 strong, determined to march town. Of the old castle there are a few unimportant | upon Dublin. Flushed with success, they summoned vestiges remaining on a steep rock, which projects into Arklow to surrender; but there was in it a stoutthe sea by the entrance of Broad Lough. It bears the hearted garrison of 1,600 men, commanded by General name of the Black Castle. There are also some re- Needham, who had no thoughts of yielding. The rebels mains of the Abbey which was founded here in the succeeded in forcing their way into the lower part of reign of Henry III. These, with a doorway of the old the town, which they set fire to and destroyed. In church, are all that remain to attest the former conse- the upper town the fight was protracted till nightfall, quence of the town, or to recall the recollections of its when the insurgents were repulsed with fearful loss. history.

Father Murphy was among the slain. Had they not Nor is there much of beauty in the town, or its im- been checked at Arklow, it is believed the misguided mediate vicinity, to attract the stranger; and it is, men might have reached the capital. therefore, seldom visited. It is, indeed, almost only There is not much that is characteristic or interesting noteworthy as an example--unhappily not a rare thing in Arklow. Of the castle there is a mere fragment left: to meet with--of an old decayed Irish town.

But so

it stands at the end of the town, against the barracks. looked at, it may be regarded with some interest; and The church is a large and substantial modern pile. there is something in the appearance of the people There are no other public buildings that call for reand their houses, and cabins also, noteworthy. The mark. The houses generally, in the principal street,

crews,

are respectable ; there is a good inn; and there must | Government; and accordingly a party of the Kildare be some amount of business. But there is an unhappy militia were stationed on the banks of the rivulet, to listlessness hanging about the place, which is very intercept the works and break the illusion :"—which, uncomfortable. Once, Arklow had an important and by the way, seems rather an Irish method of employing prosperous fishing-trade ; and there is still a large soldiers. They might occupy the “diggings” and number of fishing-boats belonging to the town. But intercept the works, but think of a regiment being the fishing has greatly fallen off. The herrings—the ordered to “ break the illusion !” However, the illufish chiefly taken-are said to have left the coast. The sion was broken somehow. The same writer says, that night we stayed there, however, there was a very large " during the short space of two months spent by these take of them; and that there is a ready market for inexperienced miners in examining and washing the them was proved by the fact that the whole quantity sands of the Ballinvalley stream, it is supposed that was purchased at once by a person from Liverpool, 2,666 (which is a mighty nice calculation] ounces of who was here with a small vessel, on the look out.' pure gold were found, which sold for about £10,000.” Indeed, we strongly suspect that if some English spirit Having driven off the gold-finders, the Government could be infused into the Arklowites – Liverpool or undertook to open mines; and the works were carried North Country energy, and South Coast skill-the on till 1798, when all the machinery was destroyed fishing would be again as of yore, or better. Improve by the insurgents. The works were renewed in 1801 ; ment is sadly wanting here. The Arklow boats are but being found not sufficiently productive to repay clumsy half-decked things ; and the nets are hardly the expenses, were eventually discontinued. “The half the size of those used by the Brighton or Hastings quantity of gold found while the stream-works were

The boatmen, too, would cut an odd figure under the management of Government, appears to beside the bluff many-jacketed Deal or Hastings fisher- have been inferior to that collected by the peasantry, men. It would do an Arklow man some good to go amounting to the value of £3,675 78. 11 d.(Wright : to one of these places, or to Brighton, for a month · Scenes in Ireland.'

) Evidently the Government or two.

workers, with all their machinery, were very unlucky, The houses in the principal street, we said, are gene- or Croaghan's stock of gold was soon exhausted ; rally respectable ; but then the rest are mostly very or perhaps there was some mistake in counting up poor. The Fishery is the worst part. There all the the 2,666 ounces. It is mentioned in Curry's 'Handhouses are mere clay cabins-many of them with one Book of Ireland,' that “a London Company had been window, and not a bit of garden, or even yard, and all engaged in streaming for gold, as it is termed, for that were looked into were dark, miserable, almost with these two years past .... but the results were not out furniture, and very filthy: yet we were assured at such as to induce them to proceed.” A few labourers, Arklow that the poor there are "comparatively well it is added, continued to be employed by them without off.”

any regular superintendence; "a fixed sum being paid The country west of Arklow is not often visited by for whatever gold they may find.” Even this casual the tourist; nor is there very much to reward him. Yet searching is now discontinued; but there yet prevails perhaps a journey by Croaghan Kinsella to Aughrim, a lingering belief among the peasantry, that there is and thence up the glen toward Lugnaquillia, would still gold in Kinsella, and only the 'lucky man' is repay the pedestrian ; the roads would hardly do for wanting. Many an anxious look, we doubt not, is cars. On the slopes of Croaghan Kinsella is passed turned on the brook when it has been 'roarin' in spate;' the celebrated Wicklow Gold Mine : "our Lagenian but we fear, as one of the peasantry of whom we had Mine," as Moore has it

been asking some questions oddly said, "it will never “Wliere sparkles of golden splendour

touch California." All over the surface shine;

Croaghan Kinsella is nearly 2,000 feet above the But if in pursuit we go deeper,

sea, lifting his head high above his neighbours for miles Allured by the gleam that shone,

around, The summit commands a prospect both wide Ah! false as the dream of the sleeper,

and magnificent. The little town of Tinahealy has Like Love, the bright ore is gone."

nothing to lead the wayfarer aside. It was destroyed This is nearly true now, but there was a time when it by the rebels in 1798, and has been rebuilt in a neater was regarded in a very different light. There had for style than usually prevails in such sequestered places ; some years been a vague report current that gold had there is an inn which will afford accommodation, if been found in this neighbourhood ; when,“ in the year, that route be taken. Aughrim, which lies in the 1796, a piece of gold, in weight about half an ounce, was route we pointed out, is quite a mountain village, rude sound by a man crossing the Ballin valley stream, the and poor, but very picturesque :-—a collection of stone report of which discovery operated so powerfully upon and clay cabins by the river's side, and backed by bare the minds of the peasantry, that every employment was mountains. Glen Aughrim, which commences here, is forsaken, the benefits of agriculture abandoned, and in its way very fine.

There are

no soft cultivated the fortunes of Aladdin, or Ali Baba, were the great slopes, but, instead, a genuine wild mountain glen, a originals they hoped to imitate. Such infatuation," swift stream running along the bottom, the vast mass of continues our author, “ called for the interference of Croaghan Moira rising full in front. The road con

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tinues beside the Aughrim river to Aughavanagh Bar- grand. But then the grandeur is that arising from the rack. For some time the giant of the Wicklow moun- savage majesty of Nature. There is nothing of the tains, the lofty Lugnaquillia, has been directly before placid or beautiful here. All is sterile, desolate ; forbidus, and here its huge form blocks further progress for- ding, as it would seem, the presence of man. But ward. The road on the right will lead to Drumgoff man has been here piercing into the very heart of the Bridge, where there is another barrack—another of the mountains. The lead-mines are extensive and producmany erected after the insurrection; the road is a tive. Indeed the glen itself is said to owe its name to portion of what is called the 'great military road,' it its mineral treasures-Glenmalure signifying the 'glen having been constructed on the same occasion, in order of much ore.' High up the Avonbeg precipitates itself to open a way into this wild mountain district. At over a long rocky shelf, and forms the Ess Waterfall. Drumgoff Bridge the rambler will find something more Immediately below Drumgoff the glen is hardly less pleasant than a barrack-a very comfortable hotel. The grand, and it assumes gradually, as it descends, a ascent of Lugnaquillia (not very often made) is best gentler character. But the proper way to see it through made from the road between Aughavanagh Barracks and its whole extent is upwards, and it can be conveniently Drumgoff. It is said to be by no means difficult—but so visited from Wooden Bridge in the Vale of Avoca. we have not made trial thereof. A guide can be had, From Drumgoff the road to Laragh and Glendalough if desired, at Drumgoff inn. Lugnaquillia is 3,039 feet exhibits to great advantage this portion of the Wicklow above the sea ; and 2,500 feet above the bottom of the Mountain range. valley. On the summit is a sort of cromlech, known as Pierce's Table. The prospect is said to be unmatched from the mountains of Wicklow-but the

The VALE OF Avoca. visitor will be fortunate who meets with a suitable day The route we have just indicated has its attractions for it. Even when all is clear on the summit, it is very for the lover of the wilder and grander scenery; but seldom that the plains and the extreme distance are that we are now to speak of delights every one. It is free from mist.

the Llangollen of Ireland. Drumgoff Bridge crosses the river Avonbeg, which On leaving Arklow, the proper course for tourists lies rises among the mountains some miles higher, and after through the demesne of Sheldon Abbey. There is a flowing through Glenmalure, unites with the Avonmore high road, but the Earl of Wicklow very liberally perat the celebrated Meeting of the Waters. That part mits the stranger either to walk or drive through his of the glen which is above Drumgoff is inconceivably grounds, and accordingly he will do well to avail him

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scene.

copper mines.

self of the privilege, and save seven miles of dull road. | With such associations and feelings to heighten her beauSheldon Abbey is the most celebrated mansion at this ties, we tno might admit the pre-eminence of Aroca. end of Wicklow. It is a modern gothic structure of The spot we have now arrived at is the Second very ornate character. The situation is low, but as Meeting of the Waters,'--sometimes said to be that much has been made of its capabilities as possible. Moore has celebrated ; but this is evidently an error, The grounds are of great extent and of great beauty, as the poet has himself in a note to the passage exthough not kept in as good condition as in English plained his allusion to be to the confluence of "the parks where the owner is resident. Some of the roads rivers Avon and Avoca ;" whereas this is the meeting too, on the outskirts of the deinesne, are bordered by of the Aughrim and the Avoca. This is a charming lines of beeches, which form rich umbrageons avenues,

Not alone have we here the meeting of the with pleasant peeps between. From the grounds of rivers, but of the glens also, many and lovely. And Sheldon, you may pass into those of Ballyarthur, the then the views buth up and down the vale are full of seat of Bayly, Esq. These are especially worth beauty. While here, too, the visitor should, if possibie, visiting. The house is not large, but plain and sub- ascend the heights of Knocknamokill, for the sake of stantial, like a moderate-sized old English manor- the wider prospect not only down the vale but over house. The grounds afford shady walks, with delicious Arklow to the sea. (Cut, No. 6.) prospects : one immediately behind the house is espe- This Second Meeting of the Waters is otherwise called cially worthy of note. Ballyarthur seems, in short, one Wooden Bridge ; close to the bridge is the chief restingof the most enjoyable residences in all Wicklow : just place of tourists. Wooden Bridge Hotel is said to be, the house and grounds one might wish for—if one ' with the exception of Quin's, at Bray, the most genehad Fortunatus' Cap--as a resting-place in these our rally frequented by tourists of all the Wicklow houses later days.

of entertainment.” (Curry's 'Hand-Book of Ireland.') From Ballyarthur we pass into the famous Vale. Higher up there is another tourist's house, the Avoca Wherever the English language is read, the beauties of Inn. the Vale of Avoca are known; and so long as music Ascending the vale some way, and having passed married to sweet verse finds admirers, its loveliness Newbridge-a very pretty spot-quite a new feature will be verdant :

opens in the landscape. The mountain sides are for “There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet

some distance literally riddled with the works of the As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet.”

These are the Ballymurtagh and CronThe Vale of Avoca is indeed extremely beautiful. It bane mines, the most extensive and valuable copperis a cheerful open valley, several miles long, nowhere mines in Wicklow: the Cronbane mine has yielded closing into a glen, nor expanding so as to leave the nearly 2600 tons of copper ore in one year. The quanopposites sides unconnected, but gently widening as tity raised is not now so great, but there are yet above it descends; it is everywhere a delightful companion- a thousand men employed in the two mines. It cannot able dale. The Avoca flows along the midst with a of course be said that the works add to the beauty or still quick current, but never disturbing the placid even picturesqueness of the scenery, but the strange scacharacter of the scenery. The hills on either hand are rification of the mountain sides, the apparently almost lofty, varied in surface and in outline, and presenting inaccessible spots in which some of the working gear is new and always pleasing combinations at every turn. placed, and the enormous slow-moving water-wheels, The valley is now thickly covered with rich dark certainly give a very peculiar and striking character masses of foliage, and presently sprinkled over with to it. An iron tramroad is carried from these mines to single trees, or detached groups, of light feathery form. Arklow haven. Sometimes the trees climb the mountain sides; at The First Meeting of the Waters, (Cut No. 7,) that others the slopes are only covered with bright verdure, which Moore has sung of, is even more beautiful than and again they are bare, rugged, and precipitous. And the other, and the general prospect of the vale more yet with all this beauty the stranger is apt at first to impressive. The Avonbeg hias rolled down from Glenquestion whether it be equal to its fame. The bard of damore a rapid mountain stream ; the Avonmore* is Erin has stamped on it the title to such superlative gentle and placid as a lowland river. All around loveliness, that the vision which has been formed of it along the valley, in the water, and on the heights-is can hardly be realized. It is forgotten that he has luxuriant foliage. The hills are bold and lofty, their associated with its natural charms a moral claim on his admiration :

* We asked a country man the meaning of these names:

Sure, then,” said he, Avon is a river, and big (which he “Yet it was not that Nature lad shed o'er the scene

pronounced lig) is little: and more” -is more little? “Ah! Her purest of crystal and brightest of green ;

no-more is great ; and so it is just the great river and the ”T was not her soft magic of streamlet or hill,

little river.” Moore was mistaken in speaking of the meeting Oh! no-it was something more exquisite still.

of "the rivers Avon and Avoca.” On the maps they are ’T was that friends, the belov'd of my bosom, were near', written as we have said, and we were assured they are so Who made ev'ry dear scene of enchantment more dear; called there: they take the name of Avoca after their conAnd who felt how the best charms of Nature improve fluence, and retain it, as we have seen, to the estuary at When we see them reflected from looks that we love." Arklow.

even

I read. With such associations and feelings to heighten her beno

at this ties, we tro might admit the pre-eminence of Aroca. ore of

The spot we have now arrived at is the ' Second Int as ' Meeting of the Waters,' --sometimes said to be that

be Moore has celebrated; but this is evidently an error, Eppuuty, as the poet has himself in a note to the passaze exenglish plained his allusion to be to the confluence of " the

roads rivers Avon and Avoca;" whereas this is the meeting Trd by of the Aughrim and the Avoca. This is a charming ze", ues, scene. Not alone have we here the meeting of the uds of rivers, but of the glens also, many and lovely. And ar, the then the view's both up and down the vale are full of

worth beauty. While here, ton, the visitor should, if poss.bie, | sub ascend the heights of Knocknamokill, for the sake of maror. the wider prospect not only down the vale but over licious Arklow to the sea. (Cut, No. 6.) fpe- This Second Meeting of the Waters is otherwise called -t, one Wooden Bridge ; close to the bridge is the chief resting. : just place of tourists. Wooden Bridge Hotel is said to be

, If one “with the exception of Quin's, at Bray, the most gene

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se our rally frequented by tourists of all the Wicklow houses

of entertainment." (Curry's 'Hand-Book of Ireland.)
Vale. Higher up there is another tourist's house, the A roca
ries of Inn.
music! Ascending the rale some way, and having passed
...less: Newbridge-a very pretty spot-quite a new feature

opens in the landscape. The mountain sides are for
1

some distance literally riddled with the works of the
1

copper mines. These are the Ballymurtagh and Cron-
il. It bane mines, the most extensive and valuable copper-
where ' mines in Wicklow: the Cronbane mine has yielded
į the nearly 2600 tons of copper ore in one year. The quan:

as tity raised is not now so great, but there are yet above 21. ion- a thousand men employed in the two mines. It cannot hith a' of course be said that the works add to the beauty or pacid even picturesqueness of the scenery, but the strange scaad are rification of the mountain sides, the apparently almost iting' inaccessible spots in which some of the working gear is turn. placed, and the enormous slow-moving water-wheels, dark certainly give a very peculiar and striking character

to it. An iron tramroad is carried from these mines to frm. Arklow haven.

l

DUBLIN AND ITS ENVIRONS. sides well covered with trees; gray crags protruding Hall's guide, God bless her! and more power from leafy canopies, or soft sunny slopes of brightest and many a good word she has bestowed u verdure. On either side other valleys open and exhibit therefore," says one; while another claims Sir fresh beauties. In the distance are mountain summits Scott, and a third is content with Mr. Fraser. clad in aërial hues, and the higher grounds are equally whole, there is not much choice between the th delightful. It is as sweet a spot wherein to spend a just so many there are. We tried two, and go summer with good company as a poet could with the third, and moreover climbed into St. desire.

Bed, and therefore are privileged to speak au The castellated mansion seen on the hill is Castle- tively. We would just as soon credit one as the Howard, the seat of Sir Ralplı Howard—a modern their power in fabling appearing, as far as w structure, more eminent for its noble site than for its judge, nearly balanced—the older one had the beauty. The views from it and from the grounds are, store and more experience, but the younger as will be readily imagined, of surpassing beauty. Our more vivacious. way onward lies along the Vale of Avon ; the tourist The name is suggestive of the character of the may pass through the demesne of Avondale, which is Glen-da-lough, is the glen of the two lakes. T three miles long, and very charming, with the Avon- lie in a deep hollow between immense mountain: more winding through the midst the whole distance. sides rise bare and precipitous from the valle Thence he passes by Rathdrum, and along the road beight of some three or four hundred fee which keeps above the Avonmore to Laragh. There is further end seems entirely closed in, but th another road from the Meetings Bridge to Rathdrum narrow and almost impassable ravine, down along the higher grounds by Castle-Howard, which, rugged bed the Glenealo, the chief feeder of th though perhaps not so beautiful as that through forces its way. The other stream which supp Avondale, is shorter, and affords wider and very fine lakes has to leap over a lofty wall of rock, fo prospects.

waterfall, called from it the Poolanas. The

about three miles long; the upper lough is GLENDALOUGH.

long, and nearly a quarter of a mile wide. It is Very striking is the first glimpse of Glendalough. this lough that the wilder features of the g You proceed from Laragh up a mountain road, which combined ; and nothing hardly can be finer appears to have an outlet only by a narrow pass at the sublime than the scene from its bosomas further end ; but a slight turn brings before you first setting in, and heavy storm-clouds are gatheri a few rude cottages, then a round tower, which rears its the mountain summits, and thin gray mists are o tall head beyond, with apparently several ruined build- | along the sides of the cliffs which rise in fi ings spread around it; and as a back-ground is a dark blackness at once from the water, and the deer hollowed coomb, formed by perpendicular rocks of waves are curling up and lashing menacingly great altitude, which then fall back into mountain the boat, as the wind sweeps along in a holl slopes. It is not till you are nearer that the lakes longed sough. become visible :-unless, indeed, you ascend the hill- It is here that some little height up the rock side somewhat-a point from which as good a general famous Bed of St. Kevin. It is a hole pierci conception of the whole glen, and lakes, and antiquities, the rock far enough and large enough to admit can be obtained as anywhere. (Cut, No. 8.)

three persons at a time. Here it was that the Long before you get near the ins a crowd of beg. St. Kevin retreated, in order to escape from the gars has beset you, intreating alms by the recital of cutions of love and the allurements of the worle every kind of distress; others beg you to purchase reader of course knows the legend—all the fragments of rock or crystal. Next come some two knows it-as told by Moore, how or three wild-looking fellows, who each assures you

* By that lake, whose gloomy shore that he is the best possible guide, and no other knows

Skylark never warbles o’er ; anything in comparison with him, and, moreover, he

Where the cliff hangs high and steep, won't deceive your honour with any false lies at all.

Young St. Kevin stole to sleep: You will do well to escape from the annoyance by

‘llere, at least,' he calmly said, selecting one ; let him lead you round to all the

• Woman ne'er shall find my bedl.' sights, tell you all the legends, induct you into St.

Ah! the good saint little knew Kevin's Bed, and persuade you, if he can, that you

What that wily sex can do!” are one of the knowingest gentlemen and best walkers The rest it is needless to repeat. Since St. K he has been along with in all the years he has ungallantly hurled the fair Kathleen from his o been there : submit to it all patiently, and you will into the deep waters below--and it is fourteen 1 then be left to stroll about in quiet and at leisure years ago—every lady who has ventured th afterwards and see things for yourself. Some of the borne a charmed life, for so the good saint in books have recommended particular guides; and the morse prayed it might be. More than a few fai men themselves boast of the great folks and fine writers have tested the charm in our day by scrambli they have conducted. “And it's myself that was Mrs. the Bed, and all have returned in safety. But

$; at The First Meeting of the Waters, (Cut No. 7, tha
Jure, ' which Moore has sung of, is even more beautiful than

And the other, and the general prospect of the vale more rst to impressive. The Avonbeg has rolled down from Gletrd of damore a rapid mountain stream; the Aronmore* is tive gentle and placid as a lowland river. All aroundof it along the valley, in the water, and on the heights-is

las luxuriant foliage. The bills are bold and lofty, their i his

• We asked a country man the meaning of these names:
"Sure, then,said he, Aron is a river, and brg (which be
pronounced lig) is little: and more" --is more little? “th!
no-more is great ; and so it is just the great river and the
little river.Moore was mistaken in speaking of the meeting
of the rivers Iron and Aroca.On the maps they are
written as we have said, and we were assured ther are so
called there: they take the name of Aroca after their con:
fluence, and retain it, as we have seen, to the estuary at
Arhlow.

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