An Essay on the Origin of Language: Based on Modern Researches, and Especially on the Works of M. Renan

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J. Murray, 1860 - Počet stran: 231
 

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Strana 17 - To th' instruments divine respondence meet: The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmure of the waters fall: The waters fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call: The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Strana 115 - ... although we think we govern our words, and prescribe it well, loquendum ut vulgus, sentiendum ut sapientes ; yet certain it is that words, as a Tartar's bow, do shoot back upon the understanding of the wisest, and mightily entangle and pervert the judgment.
Strana 42 - THE baby new to earth and sky, What time his tender palm is prest Against the circle of the breast, Has never thought that " this is I " : But as he grows he gathers much, And learns the use of "I, "and "me,' And finds " I am not what I see, And other than the things I touch.
Strana 143 - In Wonder all Philosophy began : in Wonder it ends : and Admiration fills up the interspace. But the first Wonder is the Offspring of Ignorance: the last is the Parent of Adoration.
Strana 92 - Myriads of rivulets hurrying through the lawn, The moan of doves in immemorial elms, And murmuring of innumerable bees.
Strana 29 - And out of the ground the Lord God formed every beast of the field', and every fowl of the air', and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them ' ; and whatsoever Adam called every living creature', that was the name thereof.
Strana 39 - The sum of all is, that words are the symbols of ideas both general and particular ; yet of the general, primarily, essentially, and immediately ; of the particular, only secondarily, accidentally, and mediately.
Strana 69 - The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture. Language is fossil poetry. As the limestone of the continent consists of infinite masses of the shells of animalcules, so language is made up of images or tropes, which now, in their secondary use, have long ceased to remind us of their poetic origin.
Strana 147 - It may also lead us a little towards the original of all our notions and knowledge, if we remark how great a dependence our words have on common sensible ideas...
Strana 5 - More Worlds than One. The Creed of the Philosopher and the Hope of the Christian.

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