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JOINT RESOLUTION No. 3, S.

Resolved by the Senate, the Assembly concurring, That the Chief Clerks of the Senate and Assembly be directed to prepare a Legislative Manual, similar in its general style and contents to that published pursuant to joint resolution of the Legislature of 1863, making such changes and additions as they may deem necessary ; that they be authorized to contract for the printing of the same, for diagrams and views of the Capitol, and for a small map of the State suitable for that purpose, at fair remunerative rates ; that 1,000 copies of the same be immediately published, delivered to and receipted for by said Clerks, and by them distributed in the usual manner. Adopted in Senate, January 20th, 1865.

FRANK M. STEWART,

Chief Clerk of Senate. Concurred in by the Assembly, January 21st, 1865.

JOHN S. DEAN,

Chief Clerk of Assembly.

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ECLIPSES IN 1865.

There will be four eclipses this year, two of the sun and two of the moon.

I. A partial eclipse of the moon, April 30th, visible. Begins at New York at 10h. 49m. in the evening, and ends at 35 minutes past midnight. Size, onefifth of the moon's diameter.

II. A total eclipse of the sun, April 25th, invisible in North America.

III. A partial eclipse of the moon, October 4th, in the evening, visible. Beginning at New York at 5h. 44m., and ends at 6h. 45m. Size one-third of diameter. The moon will rise eclipsed partially.

IV. An annular eclipse of the sun, October 19th, in the morning, visible as a partial eclipse throughout North America ; invisible in California and Oregon. At New York it begins at 8h. 56m., and ends at 12m. past 12. Size 7% digits, or about two-thirds of the sun's diameter.

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RATES OF POSTAGE.

DOMESTIC.

All transient matters must be prepaid by stamps.

No package will be forwarded which weighs over four pounds, except books published cr circulated by order of Congress.

Valuable letters may be registered by application at the office of mailing, ana the payment of a registration fee of 20 cents.

On all letters, 3 cents for each % ounce, or fraction thereof.

Drop or local letters, 2 cents for each % ounce or fraction thereof; no carrier's fee for delivery.

Printed Books, in one package, to one address, 4 cents for each four ounces or fraction thereof.

Circulars, unsealed, not exeeeding three in number, to one address, 2 cents; the same rate for every three or less number additional.

On all transient newspaper or other printed matter, (books and circulars excepted,) and on all seeds, cuttings, &c., pamphlets, book MSS., and proofsheets, maps, engravings, blanks, patterns, envelopes and photographs, contained in one package, to one address, 2 cents for each 4 ounces or fraction thereof.

On all matter not above specified, same rate as letters.

FOREIGN

On letters to Canada, 10 cents per half ounce, and to other British North American Provinces, when not over 3,000 miles, 10 cents for each % ounce. When over 3,000 miles, 15 cents. Prepayment optional except to Newfoundland.

To Great Britain or Ireland, 24 cents. Prepayment optional.
To France, 15 cents for each 4 ounce. Prepayment optional.

To the German States, by Prussian closed mail, prepaid, 28 cents ; unpaid, 30 cents.

Letters to other Foreign countries vary in rate according to the route by which they are sent, and the proper information can be tained of any Postmaster in the United States.

MANUAL

OF

PARLIAMENTARY PRACTICE.

BY THOMAS JEFFERSON.

IMPORTANCE OF RULES.

SECTION I.

THE IMPORTANCE OF ADHERING TO RULES. Mr. Onslow, the ablest among the Speakers of the House of Commons, used to say, “It was a maxim he bad often heard when he was a young man, from old and experienced members, that nothing tended more to throw power into the hands of Administration, and those who acted with the majority in the House of Commons, than a neg. lect of, or a departure from, the rules of proceeding; that these forms, as instituted by our ancestors, operated as a check and control on the actions of the majority; and that they were, in many instances, a shelter and protection to the minority, against the attempts of power.

So far the maxim is certainly true, and is founded in good sense, that as it is always in the power of the majority, by their numbers, to stop any improper measure proposed on the part of their opponents, the only weapon by which the minority can defend themselves against similar attempts from those in power, are the forms and rules of proceeding, which have been adopted as they were found necessary from time to time, and become the law of the House ; by a strict adherence to which, the weaker party can only be protected from those irregularities and abuses, which these forms were intended to check, and which the wantonness of power is but too often apt to suggest to large and successful majorities.—2 Hats., 171, 172.

And whether these forms be in all cases the most rational or not, is really not of so great importance. It is much more material that there should be a rule to go by, than what that rule is: that there may be a uniformity of proceeding in business, not subject to the

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