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vhq

-vhx

7. Each lock, and ev'ry bolt he tries, |

a L2

shq 0—..... - she i

8. In ev'ry creek, and corner, pries; |

a R2

Bpdq

n

9. Then opes his chest with treasure stor'd, |

Bseq

10. And stands in rapture o'er his hoard: |

R2

Bvhf c

11. But now with sudden qualms, possest, [

TRI

ld hf

ld br

12. He wrings his hands; he beats his breast-1

g br....

veq

13. By conscience stung he wildly stares; |

Bshf sh

14. And thus his guilty soul declares: |

Bsdf d

n

15. Had the deep earth her stores confin'd, |

a R2

br-R

16. This heart had known sweet peace of mind; |

R1

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Bsef sp

17.18. But virtue's sold! | Good gods! what price |

a R2

F-R

9. Can recompense the pangs of vice? |

D

Bsdf d

n

20. O bane of good! seducing cheat! |

TR1

- vef

shf st sdg

weak man, | thy power defeat? |

Bvhf

21.22. Can man,
23. Gold banish'd honour from the mind, [

seb sw- - sdq

rLi

br-R

24. And only left the name behind; |

Bphc

I

25. Gold sow'd the world with ev'ry ill; |

ceb sh-cdq

26. Gold taught the murd'rer's sword to kill: |

Lix

shf sh―sdq

27. 'T was gold instructed coward hearts |

a R2x

Bohf rj

28. In treach'ry's more pernicious arts. |

r R1

seq-sdq

29. Who can recount the mischiefs o'er? |

R2

Bpdf d

30. Virtue resides on earth no more! |

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REMARKS ON THE NOTATION OF THE MISER AND PLUTUS.

For the convenience of reference, the piece is divided into sections, by vertical bars, and the number of each section is printed in the margin.

(1.) The direction of motion, expressed by the 4th small letter, r, means that from the position in which both hands are presented, vhf, they should move towards the right, and stop at the position, oblique, as noted by q, connected by a dash to the position mentioned.

(2.) The 4th small letter, n, signifies noting.

(12.) The posture of the hands is, at first, folded horizontal forwards, as expressed in the notation, ld hf. At the a, connected by a dash, which signifies ascending, the hands are raised up, and at the next notation, ld br, they are forcibly withdrawn back on the breast.

(21.) This posture begins horizontal, as first noted, Bvhf, and ends elevated, B vef; but the B is omitted over the word, weak, being understood by the connecting dash.

(25.) The 3d small letter, relating to the transverse direction of the arm, is often placed alone, but connected by a dash with a preceding set of letters, as already observed. (1.) In such case it is to be understood that the posture of the hands remains as before, and that the transverse direction of the arm only is changed. Here each arm passes through the whole semicircle, from the position across to extended.

The fourth, and the fifth small letter, which relates to the direction and manner of motion, are also often separated, in this manner, from the position to which they belong, in order that the place of the motion, or action, may be the more distinctly marked. (See 9,

15 and 20, in which n is thus separated, to point out the particular syllable on which the action of noting falls.)

The action of the hands and arms, at No. 15 and 20, is the same, but the general effect is different, in consequence of the difference in the positions of the feet. In the preparation for these gestures, the palms of both hands are raised so as almost to touch the forehead; then they descend gradually, and when the arms are a little below the horizontal elevation, the wrists make that particular motion called noting, on the respective words, stores and cheat.

(26.) Left foot first position extended. To make this position extended, the left foot is advanced, the body at the same time is thrown back, and sinks a little, bending the right knee.

(28.) This gesture, Buhf rj, both vertical horizontal forwards rejecting, is thus made: both hands are drawn backwards, nearly to the mouth, in the vertical position; the eyes, at this time, are directed forwards, the hands are then pushed forwards, while the face is averted, and the feet retire, to a greater or less extent, in proportion to the degree of disgust or abhorrence to be expressed.

AN ELEGY WRITTEN IN A COUNTRY CHURCH-YARD.

(GRAY.)

I.

Ls veq

Bpef

d

The curfew tolls-the knell of parting day!

a R2

-

vhx

F

phf

q

T

The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea;

TR1

- phf·

q

Bveq

The ploughman homeward plods his weary way,

d

Bnef

BR

And leaves the world to darkness, and to me.

II.

R Bphc

Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight,

Bvef

q

And all the air a solemn stillness holds

iec

q

Save where the beetle wheels his drony flight,

vef rt

phf p

R

And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds:

III.

- ieq n

Save that from yonder ivy-mantled tower

R1

- veg

U

seb

The moping owl does to the moon complain

rLi

-

-shq

Of such as, wandering near her secret bower,

-veg

p

Molest her ancient, solitary reign.

IV.

shf n

- shf n

Beneath those rugged elms, that yew tree's shade,

vhf

Bbdf a

Where heaves the turf in many a mould'ring heap,

a

D

Bnef sp

Each in his narrow cell for ever laid,

F

Bphf

d

BR

The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.

v.

shf

veg w

The breezy call of incense-breathing morn,

TR1

ieq

n

The swallow, twitt'ring from the straw-built shed, idq

veg w

The cock's shrill clarion, or the

echoing horn, No more shall rouse them from their lowly bed.

Bnef sp

B sdf d

a R2

VI.

shf

For them no more the blazing hearth shall burn,

rR1

vhf

Or busy housewife ply her evening care,

B shf p

Nor children run to lisp their sire's return,

a R2

B nef a

D

F

B shf n

Or climb his knees, the envied kiss to share.

VII.

phc

Oft did the harvest to their sickle yield;

sdf st

Their furrow oft the stubborn glebe has broke ;

sec

Sw

phq sp

How jocund did they drive their team afield!

ceb bn

chf st

How bow'd the woods beneath their sturdy stroke!

VIII.

ihf nLet not ambition mock their useful toil,

ief

rL1

pef

pdf d

Their homely joys, and destiny obscure: Nor grandeur hear, with a disdainful smile,

oec

-qrj

TR1
d

a

vef

R

The short, and simple annals of the poor.

IX.

And all that Await, alike, the

vef sp

ief fl

The boast of heraldry, the pomp of pow'r,

a R2

Bshf P

9

beauty, all that wealth e'er gave,

B vhq sh

inevitable hour

TR1

vef

a

d

sdq n R

The paths of glory lead but to the grave.

a R2

X.

Bphc

q

shf n

Nor you, ye proud, impute to these the fault,

rL1

veq w

If mem❜ry o'er their tomb no trophies raise,

L2

vhf p

sec

q

Where, thro' the long-drawn aisle, and fretted vault,

a

B nef

a

d

BR

The pealing anthem swells the note of praise.

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