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otherwise support the government of such former sovereign to the same extent, and under the same circumstances, as might be required of a native born American citizen thus temporarily domiciled in such foreign country,

Resolved, That the governor is hereby requested to transmit a copy of these joint resolutions to the president of the United States, the secretary of state of the United States, and to each of our senators and representatives in congress.

Approved January 22, 1868.

NUMBER 2.

JOINT RESOLUTION for a further grant of the public lands to aid in build.

ing the Sturgeon bay and lake Michigan ship canal.

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WBEREAS, The state of Wisconsin, whose eastern boundary resting on lake Michigan, her northern boundary on lake Superior, the head of the great chain of lakes, and her western boundary on the Mississippi river, is therefore deeply interested in improving the lines of communication across the state, which open new and shorter channels for the commerce of the great west on its way to lake ports and the sea board; and

WHEREAS, The great lumber region of Green Bay in the article of lumber alone, produces annually about three hundred million (800,000,000) feet of that important product, employing a large fleet of vessels in freighting it to Chicago and other lake ports, added to which the iron ore from lake Superior, now brought to the shores of Green Bay for shipment, the grain shipments and the shipments of various products of the forest, in the aggregate make up an enormous traffic, all of which has now to seek its way out of Green Bay into lake Michigan, through the dangerous channels among the islands at "Death's Door;" and

WHEREAS, This dangerous navigation, so fatal in its results, can be avoided, and a distance of about two hundred (200) miles saved in each voyage by cutting a ship canal from the head of Sturgeon bay into lake Michigan, across the portage at the base of the peninsula, which when built will open up a commodious and land-locked harbor of refuge on the west shore of the lake for the deepest draught vessels, a haven much-needed by the entire shipping of the lakes at that point,

14 GEN. LAWS.

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for the protection of life and property from the terrible storms that frequently sweep over those inland seas;

Resolved, by the assembly, the senate concurring, That the construction of a ship canal from the head of Sturgeon bay to lake Michigan, across the portage, is worthy of the earnest attention of congress, as being a measure of great public usefulness, worthy of our encouragement and designed to promote the general welfare of the shipping and commercial interests.

Resolved, That our senators and representatives in congress be requested to aid, by all judicious and wise measures, and by a further grant of public lands, such as their judgment may approve, the speedy completion of the Sturgeon bay and lake Michigan ship canal.

Resolved, That the governor be, and he is hereby requested, to forward to each of our senators and representatives in congress, a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolutions for presentation to the congress of the United States.

Approved February 8, 1868.

NUMBER 3.

JOINT RESOLUTION for printing president Chadbourne's address.

Resolved by the senate, the assembly concurring, That one thousand copies of the address delivered by president Chadbourne, of the state university, before both houses of the leg. islature and the state historical society, on the 30th instant, be printed for the use of the legislature, and five hundred copies for the use of the state historical society.

Approved February 8, 1868.

JOINT RESOLUTIONS.—No. 4, 5.

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NUMBER 4.

JOINT RESOLUTION relative to a grapt of lands to aid in the construction

of the Minnesota and Missouri river railroad, in Dakota territory.

Resolved by the senate, the assembly coucurring, That our senators in congress be instructed, and our representatives requested, to lend all their aid and influence in procuring a grant of land from the general government, to aid in building, construct. ing and completing the Minnesota and Missouri river railroad from the western boundary of the state of Minnesota, at a point near Sioux Falls, to Yankton, the capital of Dakota territory, on the Missouri river.

Approved February 15, 1868.

NUMBER 5.

JOINT RESOLUTION inviting the state officers and legislature of the state

of Minnesota to visit the capital of Wisconsin during the session of the present legislature.

WHEREAS, The capital of our state is now connected by continuous railway communication with the capital of our sister state, Minnesota, therefore affording additional means for the interchange of friendly intercourse, and the promotion of common interests between the people of the two states, and

WHEREAS, A more extended personal acquaintance between the citizens of the two states, affording opportunities to compare thoughts and feelings would tend to the development of mutual interests and the general prosperity of each; therefore,

Resolved by the senate, the assembly concurring, That we hereby extend to the state officers and members of the legislature of the state of Minnesota, a cordial invitation to visit the legislature of Wisconsin, at the capital, at Madison, at such time during the present session thereof as may suit their convenience.

Resolved, That the governor be requested to forward a copy of these resolutions to each state officer, and to the presiding officer of each house of the legislature of the state of Minnesota.

Approved February 15, 1868.

NUMBER 6.

JOINT RESOLUTION extending the time for the reception of new business

and the final adjournment of the legislature.

Resolved by the senate, the assembly concurring, That the time for the reception of new business, as limited by joint resolution No. 5, S., is hereby extended until the 29th instant, and that the day for the final adjournment of the legislature is bereby extended until the 4th day of March next, and that the legislature will adjourn sine die on that day at 11 o'clock A. M.

Approved February 15, 1868.

NUMBER 7.

JOINT RESOLUTION requesting the American minister at London to pro

cure the British patent office reports for the state historical society.

Resolved by the senate, the assernbly concurring, That the Hon. Charles Francis Adams, our American minister to England, be respectfully requested to use his good offices with the British government to obtain the grant of a set of the British patent office reports for the state historical society of Wisconsin.

Resolved, That the governor be requested to transmit a copy of these resolutions to the American minister at London im mediately.

Approved February 21, 1868.

NUMBER 8.

JOINT RESOLUTION defining the duty of the nation towards its native and

adopted citizens.

WHEREAS, The United States of America, as an independent nation, has a constituted government, a national flag, an

army and navy, and national representatives at home and abroad; under their protection the American citizen, whether native or foreign born, should be safe against outrage and violence in every part of the earth ; and it is the verdict of the American people, the only sovereigns in this republic, that the citizens can and must and shall be protected everywhere, and at all times, in everything that is justified by equitable laws; and the original design of this government, always to protect its lawful citizens at all times and in all places, has been con. stantly kept in view by our people; therefore

Resolved by the assembly, the senate concurring, That it is the duty of the government of the United States to speedily inquire into and ascertain if American citizens are now, or have heretofore been, unjustly imprisoned or in any way restrained of their liberty by any foreign nation; or been unjustly tried and convicted of pretended offences; and if so, to demand that they be restored to all their rights as American citizens; and to further demand that they receive full indemnification for all the wrongs they have suffered. And if any foreign gov. ernment attempts to enforce her claims, and to require allegi. ance of the American citizen, whether foreign or native born, the duty of our government is plain. It must show emphati. cally the reasons of its position. It must show that the persons in question are admitted by our laws to be citizens and voters, and that to acknowledge the demand of any foreign government would be, practically, to concede that subjects of that power help to elect our officers and administer our government. If there is a principle which is popularly precious to the heart of the country, it is that those millions of foreigners who come to our shores had the right to come, the right to stay, the right to make themselves citizens by complying with the laws, and the right, as citizens, to be defended by the government.

Resolved, That, in the United States, expatriation is considered a fundamental right, and that the doctrine of perpetual allegiance grew out of the feudal system, and became inoperative when the obligation ceased upon which that system was founded. The doctrine of expatriation cannot at this day be doubted or denied in the United States, and there is no doubt that a government having undertaken to adopt a stranger is bound to protect him like any other citizen. The nation which has naturalized him, and has thus bound itself to protect him, cannot abandon its pledges on account of the views of civil obligations which another nation may entertain.

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