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sippi (in case of desertion, two years). Missouri (same as Colorado), Montana, NewHampshire, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Alaska; six months, Idaho, Nebraska, Nevada, Texas; one year, Wyoming; one year, act of Congress for all Territories. act of May 25, 1997; North Dakota, one year (act of March 6, 1899); California and South Dakota, also one year.

ALABAMA.-The courts have decided that the legislatur: cannot grant divorces.

OKLAHOMA.-Divorces granted prior to 1895 by Probate Courts are made legal; thereafter divorces can he had only through District Court. Absolute divorces are granted in:

(b) Desertion for HAWAII for following causes: (a) Adultery of either party. term of three years. (c) Imprisonment for life or more than seven years. (d) Chinese leprosy.

PORTO RICO AND THE PHILIPPINES-(a) Adultery on part of wife. This from Civil Code, but changed by act of Congress to read on part of either husband or wife."

(c) Violence to wife to change (b) Personal violence actually inflicted or grave insults.

(e) Proposal of either her religion. (d) Proposal of husband to prostitute his wife.

(f) Condemnation of either party to chains or party to corrupt or prostitute children. hard labor.

Article 104 says: "Divorce only produces the suspension of the life in common of the spouses.

Separation is granted in:

HAWAII, at option of party making application. Separation or absolute divorce is granted for the following causes: (a) Extreme cruelty; (b) habitual intemperance; (c) refusal to support. Residence for two years before divorce is required by recent act of Congress.

QUALIFICATIONS FOR SUFFRAGE.

Previous residence required.
States

Registration Excluded from voting. State. and Territories. | County, District. required.

16 3 mus.

16 16 19 20 1 yr.

30 d.

Yes. *Alabama. 30 d.

15 1 yr.

Yes,

16

30 d. Arizona Territory

6 mos. 30 d.

No. 1 yr.

15 16 *Arkansas. 90 d.

15 16 21 23 30 d.

Yes. *California.

15 16 20
6 mos.
90 d.

10 d. Colorado..

6 mos. 6 moe. Connecticut.

6 mos.
3 mos.

16 18 19 *Delaware.

6mos.
6 mos,

15 16 19 *Florida.

14 16 16 1 6mos.

30 d. Georgia

10 d.

15 16 18
6mos.
30 d.

Yes.

28, 24, 95, • Idaho.. •Illinois,

90 d.

30 d.
6 mos.
.Indiana.

6 mog.
30 d.

No.
60 d.
6 mos.

60 d.

27, 32 Yes, *Iowa...

30 d.
30 d.

2.
6 mos.

16, 18, 19, 20, 29, 30. *Kansas. 6 mos.

16 16 60 d.

3. *Kentucky

16 18 6 mos. 30 d. *Louisiana. 3 mos.

17 20 3 mos.

3 mos.

12. 29 Yes. •Maine..

20 6 mog.

1 d. *Maryland.

6 mog.

6 mos, *Massachusetts.

15, 16, 17, 20.

21 24
*Michigan,..
3 mos.

10 d.
3 mos.
30 d.

14 15

18, 20, * *Minnesota.

30 d.
1 yr.

18 19
*Mississippi
2 yrs.

18 18 1 yr.

60 d. *Missouri.

60 d. 30 d.

18 24. 30 d.

15 *Montana.

15 16 30 d.

30 d. •Nebraska.

14 13 16 18 6mos. 30 d, Nevada.,

30 d.

17 6 mos. 6 mos.

6 mos. *New-Hampshire.

5 mos.
30 d.

16 16. 17. New Jersey

6 mos, New-Mexico Terr..

3 mos.
30 d.

Yes.
1030 d.

Yes.
-New-York...
4 mos.

14 16 10
2 yrs.
6 mos.

4 mos.

11, 13 Yes. North Carolina...

15 16 •North Dakota.

6 mos.
90 d.

2.

15 16

20 a. *Ohio,... 30 d.

19 6mos. 60 d.

30 d. Oklahoma Ter...

15, 16, 24, 6 mos. •Oregon...

90 d.

30 d.

60 d. 60 d.

11No.

Non-taxpayers. *Pennsylvania.

15 16 17 19

TYes. •Rhode Island.

1 yr.
6 mos,
6 mos.

11 13.

16, 16, 17, 18, 19, South Carolina.

2 yrs.

1 yr. 4 mos, *South Dakota.

6 mon.
3 mos.
10 d.

14 16 18 20
*Tennessee.
1 yr.

11, 13Yes. 6 mos.

9.

15 16 17 *Texas.......

1 yr.
6 mos.

60 d
4 mos.

Yes. 16 16 19.
Utah..

26.
1 yr.
3 mos.
30 d.

No. *Vermont..

11 13 Yes.

13. 16. *Virginia...

1 yr.
3 mos.

30 d. •Washington.

1 yr.
6 mos.
30 d.

Yes.
6 mos.

No.

15 16 17 19 *West Virginia... 1 yr.

6mos. Wisconsin.......

18 19 20 1 yr.

10 d. *Wyoming.......

60 d.

13 Yes.
1 yi.
30 d.

15 16

* Australian ballot. Note 1-Dach State requires that a voter must be a citizen,

1 yr. 1 yr. 1 yr. 1 yr.

Yes. 13Yes. 13 Yes. 11 Yes. 11 Yes.

1 yr.

Yes.

16 16

1 yr. 1 yr.

11Yes.

1 yr. 6 mos.

Yes. 13 Yes,

Yes. 11 Yes. 13Yes.

1 yr.

1 yr.

1 yr. 1 yr.

Yes. 81 Yes, 18Yes.

Yes. 31 Yes.

1 yr.

1

1 yr.

1 yr. 1 yr.

Yes.

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INTEREST LAWS

AND

STATUTES

OF LIMITATIONS.

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Interest laws.

Statute of limitations.
States

Rate al-
and

Legal
lowed by

Judg-
Notes,

Open Days
Territories.

rate,

mente. contract,

years.

accounts,
per cent.
per cent.
years.

years. grace. Alabama

8
8
20

6

3 Arizona

Any

3 Arkansas

10

10 California

Any

5 Colorado

20
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia.

10

12 Florida

8
10

20 Georgia

8

7 Idaho

12

6

6 Illinois

7

10 Indiana

8
20

10 Iowa

8

10 Kansas

10

5

5 Kentucky

6
15

15 Louisiana

8
10

5 Maine

Any

6

320 Maryland

6

3

3 Massachusetts

Any

20

6 Michigan

7

6 & 10 Minnesota

10
10

6 Mississippi

10

7

6 Missouri

8

20

10 Montana

12

10

8 Nebraska

8
8
10

10 Nevada

7
Any

6 New Hampshire

20

6 New-Jersey

20

0 New-Mexico

12

7

6 New-York

6

6 North Carolina

6

10

7 North Dakota.

6
12
10

6 Ohio

6

5

15 Oklahoma

7
12

1 Oregon

8
10

10 Pennsylvania

6 Rhode Island.

6
Any
20

6 South Carolina

7
8

20 South Dakota.

12
10

6 Tennessee

7 Agy

10 Texas

10

10 Utah

Алу

7 Vermont

6
6

8 Virginia

6

6
€20

2 Washington

8

Any
West Virginia.

6
6
10

3 Wisconsin

7
10

20 Il'yoming

8
12

8 Over 6 per cent cannot be collected by law. * Three years for merchants, 3 Not witnessed, six years. 4 Not on notes or drafts on demand. 5 Not ourts of record, five years. &When return not made on execution, ten ye:.rs. Rate prevailing in another State permitted on evidence of indebtedness wholly secured by mortgage on property in the other State.

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Ballot contains a column for each party, Official ballot in er velope, each party having a ticket. I Soldiers. 2 In cities of over 20,000 population. In cities of the first, second, third and fourth classes. 4 In cities of St. Louis, Kansas City, Joplin, Springfield and St. Joseph. In cities of 3,000. Non-property owners must be residents two years.

Towns of 1,000. 9 Cities of 10.000. 10 Must be citizens nirety days before election. · 11 Prepayment of poll tax required. 12 Must be able to read. 18 Must be able to read and write. 14 Guilty of treason. 15 Lunatics. 1. Idiots. 17 Paupers. amists. 19Guilty of bribery. 20 Under guardianship. 21Duellists. 22 Dishonorably discharged soldiers. .8Chinese. 24 Indians holding tribal relations. 2. Polygamists. 20 Persons who have voluntarily borne arms against the United States, and not restored to civil rights by legislature. 27 Law requires voting machines. 28 For cities. 29Camp followers. 3 In cities of more than 5,000. 31 Law permits voting machines.. 32 In cities of 3,500 and over. All States prohibit persons convicted of felony from yoting.

Note 2 The above are the ordinary qualifications and disqualifications for suffrage. In the State of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia additional tests have been imposed for the purpose of disfranchising the negro voter.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS. ALABAMA-New Year's Day, R. E. Lee's birthday (Jan. 19), Shrove Tuesday, Washington's Birthday, Good Friday, Jefferson Davig's birthday (June 3), July 4. Thanksgiving Day and Christmas.

ARIZONA- Jan. 1, Washington's Birthday, May 30, July 4, Christmas, Election Day, Thanksgiving Day and Arbor Day.

ARKANSAS-Arbor Day, Thanksgiving Day, July 4 and Christmas.

CALIFORNIA--Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, first Monday in September, Sept. 9, Dec. 25, Thanksgiving Day, day of general election and every day appointed by the President or the Governor.

COLORADO-Labor Day (first Monday in September) (only statutory holiday, but other big hohdays are generally observed).

CONNECTICUT-Jan. 1, Feb. 12, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, Good Friday, Labor Day, Dec. 20 and Thanksgiving.

DELAWARE-Jan, 1, Feb. 22, July 4, Arbor apu Bird Day. Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

FLORIDA-Jan. 1, Jan. 19 (R. E. Lee's birthday), Feb, 22, April 26 (Confederate Memorial Day), June 3 (Jefferson Davis's birthday), July 4, Thanksgiving and Dec. 26.

GEORGIA- Jan. 19 (R. E. Lee's birthday), April 26, June 3, July 4, Labor Day and Dec. 25.

IDAHO-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, Friday following May 1, July 4, Election' Day, Christmas.

ILLINOIS--Jan. 1, Feb. 12. (Lincoln's Birthday), Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

INDIANA--Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), Thanksgiving and Christmas.

JOWA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

KANSAS- Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day) and Labor Day (first Monday in September).

KENTUCKY-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec, 25.

LOUISIANA--Jan. 1, Jan. 8 (ar niversary of the Battle of New Orleans), Feb. 22, Mardi Gras (day before Ash Wednesday), Good Friday, June 3 (Confederate Memorial Day), July 4, Nov. 1 (All Saints' Day), Labor Day (Nov. 25), Thanksgiving Day and Dec. 25.

MAINE-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Fast Day. Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

MARYLAND--Jan. 1, Feb. 22, Good Friday, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

MASSACHUSETTS. Feb. 22, April 19 (Patriots' Day), May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25,

MICHIGAN-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day and Dec. 25.

MINNESOTA--Jan. 1, Feb. 12 (Lincoln's Birthday), Feb. 22, Good Friday, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Thazksgiving, Dec. 25 and Arbor and Bird Days (designated by the Governor).

MISSISSIPPI--Jan. 1, Feb. 22, July 4, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

MISSOURI- Jan, 1, Feh, 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec, 25.

NEBRASKA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, April 22 (Arbor Day), May 30 (Memorial Day), July 1, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25,

NEVADA--Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Oct. 31 (Admission Day), General Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

NEW-HAMPSHIRE-Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, Fast Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25,

NEW-JERSEY-Jan. 1, Feb. 12 (Lincoln's Birthday), Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, General Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

NEW-MEXICO–Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), Arbor Day (second Friday in March), Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25 and Flag Day.

NEW-YORK-Jan. 1, Feb. 12 (Lincoln's Birthday), Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

NORTH CAROLINA Jan. 1, Jan. 19 (R. E. Lee's birthday), Feb. 22, May 10 (Confederate Memorial Day), May 20 (Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence), July 4, Oct. 12, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

NORTH DAKOTA--Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

OHIO--Jan. 1, Feb.“ 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

OKLAHOMA-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, Arbor Day, May 30. (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

OREGON-Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

PENNSYLVANIA--Jan. 1, Feb. 12 (Lincoln's Birthday), third Tuesday in Feb

ruary (local election), Feb. 22, Good Friday, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, November Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

RHODE ISLAND- Jan. 1, Feb. 22, second Friday in May, May 30 (Memoriai Day), Labor Day. Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25,

SOUTH CAROLINA- Jan, 1, Feb. 22, May 10 (Confederate Memorial Day), July 4. Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

SOUTH DAKOTA-Jan, 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day). Jaiy 4, Election Day. Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

TENNESSEE—Jan. 1, Feb. 22, Good Friday, May 30 (Memorial Day), June 3 (Jefferson Davis's birthday), July 4, Labor Day, Election Day and Thanksgiving...

TEXAS-Jan, 1, Feb. 22, March 2 (Texas independence), April 21 (Battle of San Jacinto), July 4, Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

UTAH–Jan, 1, Feb. 22, Arbor Day, May 30 (Memorial Dav), July 24 (Pioneers' Day). Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 253,

VERMONT-Jan. 1, Feb, 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Aug. 16 (Bennington Battle Day), Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

VIRGINIA–Jan. 1, Jan. 19 (R. E. Lee's birthday). Feb. 22, July 4, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

WASHINGTON-Jan. 1, Feb. 12 (Lincoln's Birthday), Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Election Day. Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

WEST VIRGINIA Jan, 1, Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Labor Day, Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

WISCONSIN-Jan. 1. Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

WYOMING Jan. 1, Feb. 12 (Lincoln's Birthday), Feb. 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 4, Election Day, Thanksgiving and Dec. 25.

LABOR DAY (first Monday in September)-By an act of Congress approved June 28, 1894, this was made a federal holiday. Labor Day is observed in Louisiana on the fourth Saturday in November.

SATURDAY HALF-HOLIDAYS--After 12 o'clock noon. Legal holiday in Colorado and Louisiana (in cities and towns of 100.000 population and over), Delaware (Newcastle County only, in Wilmington throughout the year, and rest of county from June to September), District of Columbia, Maryland (Baltimore and Annapolis only), Michigan, Missouri (in cities of 100,000 or over), New-Jersey, New-York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina (in Charleston County only) and Virginia.

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Alabama.---The legislature of Ala- , refusing to recognize the parliamentary bama on January 26 elected Edmund W. authority of the Lieutenant Governor, Pettus (Dem.) United States Senator to Warren A. Haggott, chose a presiding ofsucceed himself for the six year term ficer of its own and unseated two Repubending March 3, 1909. The vote in the lican Senators. The upper house split into two houses was unanimous.

two bodies, neither of which was recog

nized by the lower branch. Arkansas.-The legislature of Arkan

On January

20 a ballot was taken for United States sas on January 20 elected James P. Clarke

Senator, with this result: Democratic (Dem.) United States Senator to succeed

Senate--Henry M. Teller (Dem.), 26. ReJames K. Jones (Dem.) for the six year

publican Senate Edward The vote in

0. term ending March 3, 1909.

Wolcott

(Rep.). 9, and 11 votes scattered among the two branches of the legislature was:

as many other candidates. House of RepSenate-Clarke, 19; Jones, 14, House of Representatives-Clarkę, 58; Jones, 36; H.

resentatives-Teller, 25; Wolcott, 18; F. L. Remmel (Rep.), 2.

C. Goudy (Rep.), 13; Newbert (Rep.), 6;

Dixon (Rep.), 1. The Republicans ab California. -The legislature of Cali- sented themselves from the joint session fornia on January 14 elected George C. next day, and subsequently, and the DemPerkins (Rep.) United States Senator to ocratic forces could not at first muster a succeed himself for the six year term end-constitutional quorum. On January 24, ing March 3, 1909. Mr. Perkins's candi however 51 Democrats voted in joint asdacy had been previously indorsed by a sembly for Mr. Teller, and he was de Republican State Convention, The vote in clared elected United States Senator to the two branches of the legislature was: succeed himself for the six year term endSenate-Perkins, 33; Franklin K. Lane ing March 3, 1909. Governor Peabody (Dem.), 5; Eugene E. Schmitz (Union (Rep.) gave him a certificate of election. Labor), 1. Assembly-Perkins, 58; Lane,

Connecticut.-The General Assembly 12; Schmitz, 6.

of Connecticut on January 20 elected OrColorado.-Control of the Colorado ville H. Platt (Rep.) United States Senalegislature of 1903 was bitterly disputed. tor to succeed himself for the six year The House of Representatives had been term ending March 3, 1909. Mr. Platt recaptured by the Republicans; the Senate ceived a unanimous nomination in the had a Democratic majority. Several Dem- | Republican caucus. The vote in the sepaocrats were unseated on contests in the rate branches of the General Assembly lower branch, and the Senate majority, way: Senate-Platt, 18; Melbert B. Cary

(Dem.), 6. House of Representatives William E. Mason (Rep.) for the six year Platt, 169; Cary, 47; R. L. Gilbert (Labor), term ending March 3, 1909. Mr. Hopkins 3; Donald T. Warner (Pop.), 1; absent or had been indorsed as the Republican cannot voting, 35.

didate for Senator by the Republican State Delaware.-The legislature of Dela

Convention of 1902, and was nominated ware, after another long continued dead unanimously by a Republican legislative lock, succeeded on March 2 in filling the

carcus. The vote in the two branches of

the two seats in the Federal Senate left va

legislature was: Senate-Hopkins, cant during practically the whole life of 35;

James R. Williams (Dem.), 16. House the LVIIth Congress.

It chose on that of Representatives-Hopkins, 88; Williams, day Lewis Heisler Ball (Anti-Addicks Re

62; John G. Woolley (Pro, and Ind.), 2; publican) for the term ending March 3,

not voting, 2. 1905, and James Frank Allee (Addicks Re Indiana.-The legislature of_Indiana publican) for the term ending March 3, on January 20 elected Charles W. Fair1907. The fight to defeat the election of banks (Rep.) United States Senator to gucJ. Edward Addicks was renewed from the ceed himself for the six year term ending first day of balloting in the two houses. March 3, 1909. Mr. Fairbanks had no opOn January 20 the two branches voted position for reno nination. In the two separately for Senators, with this re houses the vote was: Senate-Fairbanks, sult: Senate-Long term--Addicks (Rep.), 35; Benjamin Shively (Dem.),

13. 7; Henry_A. Du Pont (Rep.), 3; R. R. House of Representatives-Fairbanks, 66; Kenney (Dem.), 7. Short term Addicks, Shively, 31. 7: Anthony Higgins (Rep.), 3; Willard Kansas.-The legislature of Kansas on Saulsbury (Dem.), 7. House of Repre January 27 elected Chester I. Long (Rep.) sentatives-Long term-Addicks, 14; Du

United States Senator to succeed William Pont, 7: Kenney, 14, Short term-Ad

A. Harris (Dem.) for the six year term dicks 13; Higgins. 7; Saulsbury, 14. Bal

ending March 3, 1909. Mr. Long was nomloting in joint session continued without

inated in the Republican caucus on Janmaterial change, except that the Demo

uary 22 on the fourth ballot, all other crats shifted candidates frequently, as did candidates withdrawing. On the third balthe Anti-Addicks Republicans. On Feb lot the vote had stood: Long, 41; Repreruary 5 Mr, Addicks published a letter

sentative Charles Curtis, 36; William E. withdrawing from the contest. But his

Stanley, 29; Representative William followers continued to vote for him until

Calderhead, 12, and Representative Justin March 2, when the deadlock was broken.

De Witt Bowersock, 6. The vote in the The vote on February 6 was: Long term

two branches of the legislature was: SenAddicks. 21; La T. Handy (Dem.), 21; L. ate-Long, 30; William A. Harris (Dem.), H. Ball (Rep.), 8; Anthony Higgins (Rep.), 6. House of Representatives-Long, 93; 2. Short term Addicks, 19; E. W. Tun- Harris, 29. nell (Dem.), 21; H. A. Du Pont (Rep.), 8; H. A. Richardson (Rep.), 2; T, C, Du Pont

Michigan.-The Michigan legislature

on January 20 elected Russell A. Alger (Rep.), 2. On February 16 the vote stood:

(Rep.) United States Senator to fill out Long term--Addicks, 20; E. D. Hearne (Dem.), 20; Ball. 8; Higgins, 2. Short

the unexpired term of the late James Mc

Millan, ending March 3, 1907. General term--Addicks, 19; J. Henry Whiteman

Alger had served as Mr. McMillan's suc(Dem.). 20; H. A. Du Pont, 8; Richardson, 2; W. W. Lobdell (Rep.), 1. The

cessor by appointment since September 27,

1902, and his election by the legislature vote in the two houses on the thirty-sixth and final ballot was: Long term J. Frank

was recommended by the Republican State

Convention of 1902. The vote in the two Allee (Rep.). 30; Willard Saulsbury (Dem.),

branches of the legislature was: Senate 17: J. H. Hughes (Dem.). 1; Woodburn Martin (Dem.), 1; E. W. Tunnell (Dem.),

Alger, 31; Lorenzo T. Durand (Dem.), 1. 1; not voting. 1 (Senator Allee). Short

House of Representatives--Alger, 122; Du

rand, 9. term-L. Heisler Ball (Rep.). 31; R. R. Kenney (Dem.), 19; B. B. Hazell (Dem.),

Missouri. -The legislature of Missouri 1; E. R. Cochran, jr. (Dem.), 1.

on January 20 elected William J. Stone

(Dem.) United States Senator to succeed Florida.-The legislature of Florida George G. Vest (Dem.) for the six year on April 21 elected Stephen R. Mallory

terın ending March 3, 1909. Mr. Stone was (Dem.) United States Senator to succeed

nominated unanimously in a Democratic himselt for the six year term ending

caucus. The vote in the two branches of March 3. 1909. Mr. Mallory received ali

the legislature was: Senate--Stone,

2: the votes cast in the State Senate and 64

Richard C. Kerens (Rep.), 7. House of in the House of Representatives, to 1 for

Representatives--Stone, 82; Kerens, 59. J. M. Toombs (Rep.).

Nevada.-The legislature of Nevada Idaho.-The legislature of Idaho on

on January 27 elected Francis G. NewJanuary 13 elected Weldon B. Heyburn

lands (Dem.) United States Senator to (Rep.) United States Senator to succeed

succeed John P. Jones (Rep.) for the Henry Heitfeld (Dem.) for the six year term ending March 3, 1909. Mr. Heyburn

six-year term ending March 3, 1909. The

vote in the two branches of the legislature was nominated in a Republican caucus,

was: Senate-Newlands, 13; Thomas P. receiving 28 votes to 22 for W. E. Borah.

Hawley (Rep.), 4. Assembly--Newlands, The vote in the two branches of the legis - 30: Hawley, 5; absent, 2. lature was: Senate-Heyburn, 15; James

New Hampshire.--The legislature of H, Hawley (Dem.), 6. House of Repre New-Hampshire on January 20 elected sentatives-Heyburn, 35; Hawley, 11.

Jacob H. Gallinger (Rep.) United States Dlinois.The legislature of Illinois on Senator to succeed himself for the six year January 20 elected Albert J. Hopkins term ending March 3, 1909. Mr. Gallinger (Rep.) United States Senator to succeed was unanimously renominated in the Re

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