Obrázky stránek
PDF
ePub

Ordered, That the said report and resolution be laid on the table and printed.

The Speaker laid before the House the bill of the House (H. R. 1460) to regulate the duties on copper and copper ores, returned by the President with his objections, which objections were read, and are as follows, viz:

To the House of Representatives :

The accompanying bill, entitled "An act regulating the duties on imported copper and copper ores,” is, for the following reasons, returned, without my approval, to the House of Representatives, in which branch of Congress it originated.

Its immediate effect will be to diminish the public receipts, for the object of the bill cannot be accomplished without seriously affecting the importation of copper and copper ores, from which a considerable revenue is at present derived. While thus impairing the resources of the government, it imposes an additional tax upon an already overburdened people, who should not be further impoverished that monopolies may be fostered and corporations enriched.

It is represented, and the declaration seems to be sustained by evi. dence, that the duties for which this bill provides are nearly or quite sufficient to prohibit the importation of certain foreign ores of copper. Its enactment, therefore, will prove detrimental to the shipping interests of the nation, and at the same time destroy the business, for many years successfully established, of smelting home ores in connection with a smaller amount of the imported articles. This business, it is credibly asserted, has heretofore yielded the larger share of the copper production of the country, and thus the industry which this legislation is designed to encourage is actually less than that which will be destroyed by the passage of this bill.

It seems also to be evident that the effect of this measure will be to enhance, by seventy per cent., the cost of blue vitriol-an article extensively used in dreing and in the manufacture of printed and colored cloths. To produce such an augmentation in the price of this commodity will be to discriminate against other great branches of domestic industry, and by increasing their cost to expose them most unfairly to the effects of foreign competition. Legislation can neither be wise nor just which seeks the welfare of a single interest at the expense and to the injury of many and varied interests at least equally important and equally deserv. ing the consideration of Congress. Indeed, it is difficult to find any reason which will justify the interference of government with any legiti. mate industry, except so far as may be rendered necessary by the requirements of the revenue. As has already been stated, however, the legislative intervention proposed in the present instance will diminish, not increase, the public receipts.

The enactment of such a law is urged as necessary for the relief of certain mining interests upon Lake Superior, which, it is alleged, are in a greatly depressed condition, and can only be sustained by an enhance ment of the price of copper. If this result should follow the passage of the bill, a tax for the exclusive benefit of a single class would be imposed upon the consumers of copper throughout the entire country not warranted by any need of the government, and the avails of which would not in any degree find their way into the treasury of the nation. If the miners of Lake Superior are in a condition of want, it cannot be justly affirmed that the government should extend charity to them in preference to those of its citizens who, in other portions of the coun

try, suffer in like manner from destitution. Least of all should the endeavor to aid them be based upon a method so uncertain and indirect as that contemplated by the bill, and which, moreover, proposes to continue the exercise of its benefaction through an indefinite period of years. It is, besides, reasonable to hope that positive suffering from want, if it really exists, will prove but temporary in a region where agricultural labor is so much in demand and so well compensated. A careful examination of the subject appears to show that the present low price of copper, which alone has induced any depression the mining interests of Lake Superior may have recently experienced, is due to causes which it is wholly impolitic, if not impracticable, to contravene by legislation. These causes are, in the main, an increase in the general supply of copper, owing to the discovery and working of remarkably productive mines, and to a coincident restriction in the consumption and use of copper, by the substitution of other and cheaper metals for industrial purposes. It is now sought to resist, by artificial means, the action of natural laws; to place the people of the United States, in respect to the enjoyment and use of an essential commodity, upon a different basis from other nations, and especially to compensate certain private and sectional interests for the changes and losses which are always incident to industrial progress.

Although providing for an increase of duties, the proposed law does not even come within the range of protection, in the fair acceptation of the term. It does not look to the fostering of a young and feeble inter. est, with a view to the ultimate attainment of strength and the capacity of self-support. It appears to assume that the present inability for successful production is inherent and permanent, and is more likely to increase than to be gradually overcome; yet in spite of this it proposes by the exercise of the law-making power to sustain that interest, and to impose it in hopeless perpetuity as a tax upon the competent and beneficent industries of the country.

The true method for the mining interests of Lake Superior to obtain relief, if relief is needed, is to endeavor to make their great natural resources fully available by reducing the cost of production. Special or class legislation cannot remedy the evils which this bill is designed to meet. They can only be overcome by laws which will effect a wise, honest, and economical administration of the government, a re-establishment of the specie standard of value, and an early adjustment of our system of State, municipal, and national taxation, (especially the latter,) upon the fundamental principle that all taxes, whether collected under the internal revenue or under a tariff, shall interfere as little as possible with the productive energies of the people.

The bill is therefore returned, in the belief that the true interests of the government and of the people require that it should not become a law.

ANDREW JOHNSON. WASHINGTON, D. C., February 22, 1869. After debate,

The question was put, Will the House, on reconsideration, agree to the passage of the said bill ?

(Yeas.................. 115 And it was decided in the affirmative, Nays......

(Not voting............ 51 Two-thirds voting in favor thereof.

The yeas and nays having been taken thereon as required by the Constitution of the United States,

..........

[ocr errors]

Those who voted in the affirmative are

Mr. Oakes Ames

Samuel M. Arnell
Delos R. Ashley
James M. Ashley
Samuel B. Axtell
Fernando C. Beaman
John F. Benjamin
W. Jasper Blackburn
Austin Blair
George S. Boutwell
Nathaniel Boyden
Johu M. Broomall
Ralph P. Buckland
Charles W. Buckley
Roderick R. Butler
Henry L. Cake
John B. Callis
John C Churchill
Reader W. Clarke
Sidney Clarke
J. W. Clift
Amasa Cobb
John Coburn
Simeon Corley
Henry L. Dawes
Columbus Delano
John T. Deweese
Oliver J. Dickey
Oliver H. Dockery

Mr. Grenville M. Dodge

Igoatius Donnelly
John F. Driggs
Ephraim R. Eckley
W. P. Edwards
Benjamin Eggleston
Jacob H. Ela
Thomas D. Eliot
John F. Farnsworth
Orange Ferriss
Thomas W. Ferry
William C. Fields
John R. French
Samuel F. Gove
John A. Griswold
George A. Halsey
David Heaton
William Higby
John Hill
Benjamin F. Hopkins
Chester D, Hubbard
Calvin T. Hulburd
Ebon C. Ingersoll
Thomas A. Jenckes
James A. Johnson
Alexander H. Jones
William D. Kelley
Francis W. Kellogg
William H. Kelsey

Mr. John K. Ketcham Mr. William H. Roberten
Bethuel M. Kitchen

Logan H. Roots
William H. Koontz

Philetus Sawyer
George V. Lawrence Robert C. Schepek
William Lawrence

Glenni W. Scofield William S. Lincoln

John P. C. Sbanks James M. Marvin

Samuel Shellabarger Horace Maynard

Worthington C. Smith Samuel McKee

Rufus P. Spalding Ulysses Mercur

William B. Stokes
George F. Miller

John H. Stover
William Moore

John Taffe
James K. Moorhead

Caleb N. Taylor
Daniel J. Morrell

John Trimble
James Mullins

Row'd E. Trowbridge
Leonard Myers

Ginery Twichell
Carman A. Newcomb Charles L'pson
Benjamin W. Norris Henry Van Aernam
David A. Nunn

Burt Van Horu
Charles O'Neill

Robert T. Van Horn
Halbert E. Paine

Hamilton Ward
S. Newton Pettis

Cadwal'r C. Wachbarn
Charley W. Pierce

William B. Washburn
Tobias A. Plants

Martin Welker
Luke P. Poland

Thomas Williams
Theodore M. Pomeroy William Williains
Hiram Price

John T. Wilson
C. H. Prince

William Windom.
Green B. Raum

Those who voted in the negative areMr. William B. Allison Mr. John Fox

Mr. Norman B. Judd
Stevenson Archer

Adam J. Glossbrenner George W. Julian
Jehu Baker
J.S. Golladay

Michael C. Kerr
Demas Barnes
James H. Goss

J. Proctor Knott
John Beatty
Asa P. Grover

William Loughridge
James B. Beck
Charles Haight

John Lynch
Henry P. H. Bromwell Charles M. Hamilton Samuel S. Marshall
James Brooks
Abner C. Harding

James R. McCormick
Albert G. Burr
Isaac R. Hawkins

Hiram McCullough
Samuel F. Cary
William S. Holman

William Mungen
John W. Chanler
Julins Hotchkiss

William E. Niblack
Burton C. Cook

James M. Humphrey John A. Nicholson
Thomas Cornell
Morton C. Hunter

Godlove S. Orth
Shelby M. Cullom
Thomas L. Jones

Sidney Perham

Mr. John A. Peters

Charles E. Phelps
Frederick A. Pike
Lewis W. Rosy
H. H. Starkweather
Thomas E. Stewart
Frederick Stone
Stephen Taber
Francis Thomas
Nelson Tift
Philadelph Van Trump
B. F. Whittemore
James F. Wilson
P. M. B. Young.

Those not voting are-
Mr. George M. Adams Mr. John Covode

George W. Anderson Nathan F. Dixon
Alexander H. Bailey Charles A. Eldridge
John D. Baldwin

James T. Elliott
Nathaniel P. Banks

James A. Garfield William H, Barnum

J. Lawrence Getz Jacob Benton

Joseph J. Gravely John A. Bingham

Thomas Haughey James G. Blaine

Samuel Hooper Thomas Boles

Avahel W. Hubbard C. C. Bowen

Richard D. Hubbard Benjamin M. Bover

Addison H. Laflin Benjamin F. Butler Israel G. Lash

[blocks in formation]

So the House, on reconsideration, agreed to the passage of the said bill.

Ordered, That the Clerk communicate the said bill and the objections of the President thereto to the Senate, and acquaint the Senate with the action of the House thereon.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. McDonald, their chief clerk: Mr. Speaker : The Senate have disagreed to the amendments of the House to a joint resolution and bill of the Senate of the following titles, viz:

S. R. 8. Joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States;

S. 440. An act supplementary to an act entitled “ An act to provide a national currency secured by a pledge of United States bonds, and to provide for the circulation and redemption thereof," approved June 3, 1864;

Ask a conference with the House on the disagreeing votes of the two houses, and have appointed Mr. Stewart, Mr. Conkling, and Mr. Edmunds, the conferees on the part of the Senate on the former, and Mr. Sherman, Mr. Morgan, and Mr. Cameron, the conferees on the part of the Senate on the latter.

The Senate have passed a bill and joint resolutions of the House of the following titles, viz:

H. R. 1858. An act making appropriations (in part) for the expenses of the Indian department and for fulfilling treaty stipulations;

H. Res. 407. Joint resolution for the relief of Frederick Schley; severally without amendinent; and

H. Res. 438. Joint resolution relative to certain purchases by the Interior Department; with an amendment, in which I am directed to ask the concurrence of the House.

The Senate have also passed a joint resolution and bills of the following titles, viz:

S. R. 228. Joint resolution authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to admit free of duty certain submarine telegraph cable;

S. 458. An act to abolish the office of superintendent of reports and drawback;

S. 968. An act authorizing certain banks named therein to change their names; and

S. 936. An act supplementary to an act entitled "An act to authorize the extension, construction, and use of a lateral branch of the Balti. more and Potomac railroad into and within the District of Columbia," approved February 5, 1867 ; in which I am directed to ask the concurrence of the House.

The Sergeant-at-arms appeared at the bar of the House having in. custody John H. Bell, arrested by the order of the House;

When

Mr. Blair submitted the following resolution; which was read, con sidered, and agreed to, viz:

Resolved, That Joseph H. Bell, of Orange county, in the State of New York, now in the custody of the Sergeant-at-arms, for a contempt in refusing to answer certain questions put to him by the select committee of this house appointed to examine into alleged frauds committed at the late presidential election in the State of New York, be now arraigned at the bar of this house, and that the Speaker propound to him the following interrogatories:

1. What excuse have you for refusing to answer the questions propounded to you by the select committee of this house appointed to examine into alleged frauds committed at the late presidential election in the State of New York ?

2. Are you now ready to appear before said committee and answer such questions as shall be propounded to you by said committee ?

And thereupon the Speaker propounded the said interrogatories to the said John H. Bell; and the same having been responded to,

Mr. Ross moved that he be discharged from custody.
Pending which,
On motion of Mr. Ward, the said motion was laid on the table.

The said Bell was then remanded to the custody of the Sergeant-atarms.

The Sergeant-at-arms again appeared at the bar of the House having in custody David W. Reeve, arrested by the order of the House;

When

Mr. Blair submitted the following resolution; which was read, considered, and agreed to, viz:

Resolved, That David W. Reeve, of Orange county, in the State of New York, now in the custody of the Sergeant-at-arms for a contempt in refusing or neglecting obedience to the summons requiring him to appear and testify before the select committee of this house appointed to examine into alleged frauds committed at the late presidential election in the State of New York, be now arraigned at the bar of this house, and that the Speaker propound to him the following interrogatories :

1. What excuse have you for refusing to answer before the select committee of this house appointed to examine into alleged frauds committed at the late presidential election in the State of New York, in pursuance of the summons served on you for that purpose ?

2. Are you now ready to appear before said committee and answer such questions as shall be put to you by said committee?

And thereupon the Speaker propounded the said interrogatories to the said David W. Reeve, and the same having been responded to, Mr. Ross moved that he be discharged from custody. Pending which, Mr Ward moved that the said motion be laid on the table. And the question being put,

( Yeas...................... 124 It was decided in the affirmative, Nays......

/ Not voting.... The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the members present, Those who voted in the affirmative are

Mr. William B. Allison Mr. John F. Driggs
Oakes Ames

Ephraim R. Eckley
Samuel M. Arnell

W. P. Edwards Delos R. Ashley

Benjamin Eggleston James M. Ashley

Jacob H. Ela Jehu Baker

Thomas D. Eliot
Fernando C. Beaman James T. Elliott
John F. Benjamin

Orange Ferriss
W. Jasper Blackburn Thomas W. Ferry
Austin Blair

William C. Fields
George S. Boutwell James H. Goss
Nathaniel Boyden

Samuel F. Gove Henry P. H. Bromwell Joseph J. Gravely John M. Broomall

John A. Griswold Ralph P. Buckland

George A. Halsey Charles W. Buckley Charles M. Hamilton Benjamin F. Butler

Abner C. Harding Roderick R. Butler

Isaac R, Hawkins Henry L. Cake

David Heaton John B. Callis

William Higby. John C. Churchill

John Hill Reader W. Clarke

Benjamiu F. Hopkins J. W. Clift

Chester D. Hubbard Amasa Cobb

Calvin T. Hulburd Burton C. Cook

Morton C. Hunter Simeon Corley

Thomas A. Jenckes Thomas Cornell

Alexander H. Jones Shelby M. Cullom

Norman B. Judd John T. Deweese

George W. Julian Oliver J. Dickey

William D. Kelley Ignatius Donnelly

William H. Kelsey

Mr. John H. Ketcham Mr. Green B. Raum
Bethuel M. Kitchen

William H, Robertson
William H. Koontz

Logan H. Roots
Addison H. Laflin

Philetus Sawyer
William Lawrence

Glenni W. Scofield
William S. Lincoln

John P. C. Shanks John A. Logan

Samuel Shellabarger William Loughridge Worthington C. Smith Rufus Mallory

Rufus P. Spalding James M. Marvin

H. H. Stark weather
Horace Maynard

Aaron F. Stevens
Samuel McKee

William B. Stokes
Ulysses Mercur

John H. Stover
George F. Miller

John Taffe
William Moore

Caleb N. Taylor
James K. Moorhead

Francis Thomas
Daniel J. Morrell

John Trimble
James Mullins

Row'd E. Trowbridge
Leonard Myerg

Ginery Twicheli
Carman A. Newcom 5 Charles Upson
J. P. Newsham

Henry Van Aerdam
Benjamin W. Norris Burt Van Horu
David A. Nunn

Robert T. Van Horn
Charles O'Neill

Hamilton Ward
Halbert E. Paine

Cadwal'r C. Washburn
Sidney Perham

Henry D. Washburn
Tobias A. Plants

Martin Welker
Luke P. Poland

B. F. Whittemore
Theodore M. Pomeroy William Williams
Hiram Price

John T. Wilson
C. H. Prince

William Windom,

Those who voted in the negative are

Mr. Stevenson Archer

Samuel B. Axtell
William H. Barnum
James Brooks
Samuel F. Cary
John W. Chanler
Charles A. Eldridge
John Fox
J. Lawrence Getz

Mr. J. S. Golladay

Asa P. Grover
Charles Haight
William S. Holman
Julius Hotchkisy
James M. Humphrey
Ebon C. Ingersoll
James A. Johnson

Mr. Thomas L. Jones

Michael C. Kerr
Samuel S. Marshall
James R. McCormick
Hiram McCullough
William Mungen
William E. Niblack
John A. Nicholson

Mr. Charles E. Phelps

John V. L Pruyn
William E. Robinson
Lewis W. Rons
Stephen Taber
Nelson Tift
Philadelph Van Trump
P. M. B. Young,

« PředchozíPokračovat »